vb vs. vba


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Thread: vb vs. vba

  1. #1
    Danny Guest

    vb vs. vba


    Hello, everyone...
    I was curious what your opinions are in terms of
    the employability and the future employment outlook for
    VB vs. VBA programmers.

    I am junior to intermediate level in VB, and would rather
    focus my time studying more on VB, but I've come across
    some people that have told me VBA is the way to go.
    However, the various VBA office objects are foreign to me,
    and I don't know if it's worth the time to tackle VBA
    when I believe VB is more in demand in the marketplace.

    Danny


  2. #2
    hylton Guest

    Re: vb vs. vba


    I disagree that 'vba is the way to go'...as you've discovered, the various
    object models that exist out there (like in Office) are pretty complex and
    I think you'll find it more useful to stick w/ VB and now VB.NET and learn
    them...VBA really becomes an extension of your VB skills as you need it...even
    though the languages are the opposite (meaning VB is built off of VBA).

    What I mean by that is that the actual 'engine' underneath VB is the VBA
    language...VB is just (simply stated) a development platform and IDE sitting
    on top of VBA. The MSVBVM60.dll is the core file and is really the platform
    from which both languages (if you want to call them different languages)
    run.

    Anyway...the point is, VBA is nice to have in your toolbox when you need
    it, but you are going go find VB more flexible (for general coding and software
    development) and I think more 'in demand' than you will with VBA.

    Just do the VBA stuff as you need it, picking up the pieces of the object
    models that you need...you'll find it pretty second nature as you get better
    and better at VB.

    Chris

    "Danny" <aznbostn@aol.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hello, everyone...
    >I was curious what your opinions are in terms of
    >the employability and the future employment outlook for
    >VB vs. VBA programmers.
    >
    >I am junior to intermediate level in VB, and would rather
    >focus my time studying more on VB, but I've come across
    >some people that have told me VBA is the way to go.
    >However, the various VBA office objects are foreign to me,
    >and I don't know if it's worth the time to tackle VBA
    >when I believe VB is more in demand in the marketplace.
    >
    >Danny
    >



  3. #3
    Arthur Wood Guest

    Re: vb vs. vba


    I fully concur...while VBA IS the basis of both, you will find it MUCH better
    to become very fluent in VB, and then use VBA as needed. I have found the
    I do not need to fully comprehend the entirety of the VBA object model, in
    , say Excel, to be able to write VERY effective and useful Excel "macro"
    code, as needed. But if I were not fluent in VB, and its syntax, then writing
    that effective Excel code would be a nightmare.

    Do not paint yourself into the corner by becoming a VBA specialist. That
    will, in the long run, prove to be a BAD career choice. If for no other
    reason than because, if you attempt to understand the whole object model
    in any one Office package, then you will spend SO MUCH time, that you will
    have relegated yourself to using THAT application ONLY, to the exclusion
    of all others, and I strongly advise AGAINST taking that path. In my position,
    I have found it necessary to use VB 6 AND Excel VBA AND Access VBA AND VBScript
    (in ASP) AND VBScript ( in Outlook)---get the idea. All of those flavors
    of VBA (VBScript is simply another flavor of VBA) will come into play at
    one time or another during your career, if you plan to do anything professionally.


    Arthur Wood

    "hylton" <cchylton@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >I disagree that 'vba is the way to go'...as you've discovered, the various
    >object models that exist out there (like in Office) are pretty complex and
    >I think you'll find it more useful to stick w/ VB and now VB.NET and learn
    >them...VBA really becomes an extension of your VB skills as you need it...even
    >though the languages are the opposite (meaning VB is built off of VBA).
    >
    >What I mean by that is that the actual 'engine' underneath VB is the VBA
    >language...VB is just (simply stated) a development platform and IDE sitting
    >on top of VBA. The MSVBVM60.dll is the core file and is really the platform
    >from which both languages (if you want to call them different languages)
    >run.
    >
    >Anyway...the point is, VBA is nice to have in your toolbox when you need
    >it, but you are going go find VB more flexible (for general coding and software
    >development) and I think more 'in demand' than you will with VBA.
    >
    >Just do the VBA stuff as you need it, picking up the pieces of the object
    >models that you need...you'll find it pretty second nature as you get better
    >and better at VB.
    >
    >Chris
    >
    >"Danny" <aznbostn@aol.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>Hello, everyone...
    >>I was curious what your opinions are in terms of
    >>the employability and the future employment outlook for
    >>VB vs. VBA programmers.
    >>
    >>I am junior to intermediate level in VB, and would rather
    >>focus my time studying more on VB, but I've come across
    >>some people that have told me VBA is the way to go.
    >>However, the various VBA office objects are foreign to me,
    >>and I don't know if it's worth the time to tackle VBA
    >>when I believe VB is more in demand in the marketplace.
    >>
    >>Danny
    >>

    >



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