Job Hopper?


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Thread: Job Hopper?

  1. #1
    Peter Le Guest

    Job Hopper?

    Hi folks,

    I am very impressed on seeing some of the responses in this forum, so I'd
    like to present my situation here in the hope that maybe some of you could
    point me to the right direction. I graduated from college since 1990 and
    had about 4 years of mainframe programming for a local university. After
    that, I worked in foxpro/Visual foxpro/SQL Server about more than a year at
    a non-profit org and exactly 2 years at a pharmaceutical company. Then I
    got so sick of foxpro that I went for a job at a city agency, hoping to
    learn and use Oracle developer (that's what they advertised to me when I
    went on the job interview). After staying there for 6 months and getting
    fired (mainly because I couldn't get along with the political environment in
    the government), I was lucky enough to obtain a job with a software company
    where I really enjoyed working with VB/SQL/ASP. Unfortunately, after 7
    months, I heard some people that I might get better salary somewhere else
    since my current employer at the time paid below the market, so I accepted
    another job offer from a well-known company in wall st. This time, the
    interviewer misled me about the position and convinced me that I would be
    hired to do java development. After I came onboard, I found out that my
    task was to maintain a legacy application in foxpro, and any promises to
    conver the app to java appeared to be a gimmick. Trying to stay put in that
    company for about 2 months, I found another job where I only stayed for 3
    months because the users decided to outsource the project, and I am
    currently working as a java developer for a small company ( I 've been
    staying with this company ever since.)

    In short, as you can see from the above, I am afraid that future employers
    would look at my background and think that I am a "job hopper". While they
    are partly correct in this assessment, I feel the need to avoid getting
    stuck in a situation that I had no control or the environment does not allow
    me to grow in technology. All of these changes will probably force me to
    stay with my current employer for years to come. My question to you all is:
    Do I make a blunder in my career by changing jobs in a matter of months
    rather than years? I feel that established companies would look down on
    someone with my background, but could this be fixed in any ways?...

    Thanks for your insight,

    Peter





  2. #2
    Matthew Cromer Guest

    Re: Job Hopper?


    Hi Peter.

    I guess my first question is: what do you want from your career in software
    development? Are you looking to move every few years to new companies and
    new challenges? Are you looking to move into management? It sounds like
    you enjoy moving from company to company, project to project, or at least
    like it better than working the same job for years and years. Maybe you
    should look into consulting. The pay is generally better (sometimes a lot
    better), and no one will every question you about working only three months
    at one place. You can generally avoid office politics as well, which sounds
    like something you would just as soon avoid. On the downside, you must be
    responsible for your own training and for keeping working on valuable, salable
    skills. You must also be prepared for a gig to end overnight, without warning,
    and having to go out and find other work. That means keeping a large cash
    cushion for rainy days. Also, you should be comfortable moving into a new
    position and performing productively with minimal start-up time. An ability
    to interview well is very important, because you will do it often. Expect
    to sit in the worst spaces in offices, even though you will probably make
    more money than anyone else in the office. If you do go the consulting route,
    you should be extremely wary about consulting companies because they will
    try to pay you as little as possible (and charge as much as possible for
    your services to the client). I would only consider consulting a good idea
    if your work is a high caliber and generally impresses other developers you
    work with. I'd recommend you hang around at the RealRates web site and message
    board (www.realrates.com) to familiarize yourself with the lifestyle.

    Good luck,

    Matthew Cromer


  3. #3
    Oren Guest

    Re: Job Hopper?

    > I am afraid that future employers
    > would look at my background and think that I am a "job hopper".


    As an owner/manager of a business I can tell you this is quite likely. I
    generally tell my employees to put the hoppers in the "maybe contact in the
    future pile" (iow, maybe around 6980 or so) unless they have a kick ***
    resume, and then usually they have to kick *** in the phone interview before
    we will even grant them an in person...........
    With the number of ppl jumping ship to get into the latest "internet
    startup", even if you are a bleeding edge company, you want to be sure that
    you have employees that you can count on to finish there projects. As
    comprehensively continuing someone elses project usually takes a **** of a
    lot of re-writing, or a **** of a lot of time sitting through the code and
    figuring out what the **** they did, comments or not. I as the employer have
    to not only pay for the employees time to sit down and read the code of
    someone who left for better stock options, but I lose the money associated
    with him working on his other project(s).

    *note, project can also mean a specific module in a
    program

    > Do I make a blunder in my career by changing jobs in a matter of months
    > rather than years?


    It is not a sign that most companies like seeing, but if you have good
    references from everywhere you worked, it might not matter as long as the
    company takes the time to call them and does not drop your resume into the
    "call later" bin.

    > I feel that established companies would look down on
    > someone with my background, but could this be fixed in any ways?...


    It might be difficult to overcome, but as long as you have a kick ***,
    down to earth, resume you should at least get an interview. The interview is
    your chance to really show what you can do. It also lets you show that you
    have a great personality that will make you a beneficial part of the
    office's working environment. If you can ace the interview, then don't
    really worry about anything else.


    Oren



  4. #4
    Charlie Guest

    Re: Job Hopper?


    Peter - I was a software development manager for several years, and can tell
    you that a track record like yours would set off every warning bell in my
    head. By changing jobs every few months, you give the impression that you
    place your happiness in the hands of your employer, and when they fail you,
    you're a vapor trail to the exit. No manager wants to deal with someone
    who needs to be catered to like that! What you need to realize is that employers
    are not going to make you happy - you've got to find your own happiness,
    whether you're developing in foxpro, java, or Cobol.
    You're almost never going to find an employer who will allow you to walk
    in the door and instantly start working on the coolest stuff in the building.
    You've got to pay your dues first. If you perform well, you will be given
    opportunities.

    "Oren" <CompuMight@erols.com> wrote:
    >> I am afraid that future employers
    >> would look at my background and think that I am a "job hopper".

    >
    > As an owner/manager of a business I can tell you this is quite likely.

    I
    >generally tell my employees to put the hoppers in the "maybe contact in

    the
    >future pile" (iow, maybe around 6980 or so) unless they have a kick ***
    >resume, and then usually they have to kick *** in the phone interview before
    >we will even grant them an in person...........
    > With the number of ppl jumping ship to get into the latest "internet
    >startup", even if you are a bleeding edge company, you want to be sure that
    >you have employees that you can count on to finish there projects. As
    >comprehensively continuing someone elses project usually takes a **** of

    a
    >lot of re-writing, or a **** of a lot of time sitting through the code and
    >figuring out what the **** they did, comments or not. I as the employer

    have
    >to not only pay for the employees time to sit down and read the code of
    >someone who left for better stock options, but I lose the money associated
    >with him working on his other project(s).
    >
    > *note, project can also mean a specific module in a
    >program
    >
    >> Do I make a blunder in my career by changing jobs in a matter of months
    >> rather than years?

    >
    > It is not a sign that most companies like seeing, but if you have good
    >references from everywhere you worked, it might not matter as long as the
    >company takes the time to call them and does not drop your resume into the
    >"call later" bin.
    >
    >> I feel that established companies would look down on
    >> someone with my background, but could this be fixed in any ways?...

    >
    > It might be difficult to overcome, but as long as you have a kick ***,
    >down to earth, resume you should at least get an interview. The interview

    is
    >your chance to really show what you can do. It also lets you show that you
    >have a great personality that will make you a beneficial part of the
    >office's working environment. If you can ace the interview, then don't
    >really worry about anything else.
    >
    >
    > Oren
    >
    >



  5. #5
    Peter Le Guest

    Re: Job Hopper?

    Thank you for your feedback, Charlie. While I appreciate yours and others'
    constructive criticism,
    I still think that there are exceptions to the rule. In this new economy,
    being loyal to one employer does not mean that the employee can blindly
    forfeit his or her career if there is no ultimate career path for that
    employee in the organization. I have seen cases when a loyal employee got
    "down-sized" (or "right sized") after spending 10 or 12 years with the same
    company. I guess that 's why the French called it "C' est la vie!"

    Regards,

    Peter

    "Charlie" <ca_germ@deja.com> wrote in message
    news:398b5d10$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > Peter - I was a software development manager for several years, and can

    tell
    > you that a track record like yours would set off every warning bell in my
    > head. By changing jobs every few months, you give the impression that you
    > place your happiness in the hands of your employer, and when they fail

    you,
    > you're a vapor trail to the exit. No manager wants to deal with someone
    > who needs to be catered to like that! What you need to realize is that

    employers
    > are not going to make you happy - you've got to find your own happiness,
    > whether you're developing in foxpro, java, or Cobol.
    > You're almost never going to find an employer who will allow you to walk
    > in the door and instantly start working on the coolest stuff in the

    building.
    > You've got to pay your dues first. If you perform well, you will be

    given
    > opportunities.
    >
    > "Oren" <CompuMight@erols.com> wrote:
    > >> I am afraid that future employers
    > >> would look at my background and think that I am a "job hopper".

    > >
    > > As an owner/manager of a business I can tell you this is quite

    likely.
    > I
    > >generally tell my employees to put the hoppers in the "maybe contact in

    > the
    > >future pile" (iow, maybe around 6980 or so) unless they have a kick ***
    > >resume, and then usually they have to kick *** in the phone interview

    before
    > >we will even grant them an in person...........
    > > With the number of ppl jumping ship to get into the latest "internet
    > >startup", even if you are a bleeding edge company, you want to be sure

    that
    > >you have employees that you can count on to finish there projects. As
    > >comprehensively continuing someone elses project usually takes a **** of

    > a
    > >lot of re-writing, or a **** of a lot of time sitting through the code

    and
    > >figuring out what the **** they did, comments or not. I as the employer

    > have
    > >to not only pay for the employees time to sit down and read the code of
    > >someone who left for better stock options, but I lose the money

    associated
    > >with him working on his other project(s).
    > >
    > > *note, project can also mean a specific module in a
    > >program
    > >
    > >> Do I make a blunder in my career by changing jobs in a matter of months
    > >> rather than years?

    > >
    > > It is not a sign that most companies like seeing, but if you have

    good
    > >references from everywhere you worked, it might not matter as long as the
    > >company takes the time to call them and does not drop your resume into

    the
    > >"call later" bin.
    > >
    > >> I feel that established companies would look down on
    > >> someone with my background, but could this be fixed in any ways?...

    > >
    > > It might be difficult to overcome, but as long as you have a kick

    ***,
    > >down to earth, resume you should at least get an interview. The interview

    > is
    > >your chance to really show what you can do. It also lets you show that

    you
    > >have a great personality that will make you a beneficial part of the
    > >office's working environment. If you can ace the interview, then don't
    > >really worry about anything else.
    > >
    > >
    > > Oren
    > >
    > >

    >




  6. #6
    Cindy Winegarden Guest

    Re: Job Hopper?

    | In this new economy,
    | being loyal to one employer does not mean that the employee can blindly
    | forfeit his or her career if there is no ultimate career path for that
    | employee in the organization.

    Peter,

    I guess that is the part you get to explain in the interview - that you
    value loyalty also, but the other companies didn't.

    You may also have to explain that you made poor employment choices, or that
    you had no other choice at the time and took the job anyways, but bailed out
    as soon as you could.


    --


    Cindy Winegarden
    Microsoft Certified Professional, Visual FoxPro

    Duke Children's Information Systems
    Duke University Medical Center
    cindyw@duke.edu



    "Peter Le" <lemanhduc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:398b6c42$1@news.devx.com...
    | Thank you for your feedback, Charlie. While I appreciate yours and
    others'
    | constructive criticism,
    | I still think that there are exceptions to the rule. In this new economy,
    | being loyal to one employer does not mean that the employee can blindly
    | forfeit his or her career if there is no ultimate career path for that
    | employee in the organization. I have seen cases when a loyal employee got
    | "down-sized" (or "right sized") after spending 10 or 12 years with the
    same
    | company. I guess that 's why the French called it "C' est la vie!"
    |
    | Regards,
    |
    | Peter




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