next move?


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  1. #1
    Brian Guest

    next move?


    Hi all,

    like many of the other posts on this ng, I am also interested in switching
    careers.
    Now, I'm wondering what my next move should be.

    I currently have a PhD in biology. However, my PhD and my current post-doc
    has largely been
    focused on programming simulation models of biological processes (so I've
    been doing some
    programming for 6+ yrs). I realized quite early on that I enjoyed the program
    development side of
    what I was doing. I started thinking about an alternative career path (i.e.,
    software developer) and
    started to try to make my skills more marketable with respect to software
    development jobs. So
    I learnt C++ and Visual Basic, using the STL, making VB controls, DLLs, and
    add-ins, general
    algorithms/data structures, etc. Further, because I would be switching careers,
    I've also re-programmed
    a number of projects to demonstrate the type of programming I've been doing
    (except in a
    graphical, user friendly way, rather than in the typical scientific style).
    I've also refocused my
    resume and cover letter to highlight skills obtained wrt software development
    and academic
    awards/honours (to show that I was not just scaping by), and de-emphasized
    much of the
    other things most relevant to biology.

    So my question is, what should my next move be? And also, how best to sell
    myself?

    Thanks,

    Brian


  2. #2
    simon Guest

    Re: next move?

    Brian,

    Your next move should be getting yourself down here in the Dallas-Fort Worth
    area (if you are not here already), haha. Big corporations like Cisco,
    Nortel, Acatel, etc etc are hiring software engineers like crazy here. They
    never get enough of them. They actually have to go outside the country to
    find people to work!!!

    Anyway, I suggest you to find yourself a few recruiters (never use just one)
    and let them sell/market you. They work on commission and they will work
    very hard for you. You don't have to do that yourself and that's the good
    part of it. Those recruiters know the market. Sit down and talk to them
    and they can assess your marketability.

    In my opinion, you are in pretty good shape. The only possible down-side
    might be your PhD degree. It might create problem on your salary range.
    Other than that, you should have no problem getting into the software
    development profession.

    Hope this helps.

    simon.



    "Brian" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    news:39f2fea4$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > Hi all,
    >
    > like many of the other posts on this ng, I am also interested in switching
    > careers.
    > Now, I'm wondering what my next move should be.
    >
    > I currently have a PhD in biology. However, my PhD and my current post-doc
    > has largely been
    > focused on programming simulation models of biological processes (so I've
    > been doing some
    > programming for 6+ yrs). I realized quite early on that I enjoyed the

    program
    > development side of
    > what I was doing. I started thinking about an alternative career path

    (i.e.,
    > software developer) and
    > started to try to make my skills more marketable with respect to software
    > development jobs. So
    > I learnt C++ and Visual Basic, using the STL, making VB controls, DLLs,

    and
    > add-ins, general
    > algorithms/data structures, etc. Further, because I would be switching

    careers,
    > I've also re-programmed
    > a number of projects to demonstrate the type of programming I've been

    doing
    > (except in a
    > graphical, user friendly way, rather than in the typical scientific

    style).
    > I've also refocused my
    > resume and cover letter to highlight skills obtained wrt software

    development
    > and academic
    > awards/honours (to show that I was not just scaping by), and de-emphasized
    > much of the
    > other things most relevant to biology.
    >
    > So my question is, what should my next move be? And also, how best to sell
    > myself?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Brian
    >



  3. #3
    Brian Leung Guest

    Re: next move?


    Hi Simon,

    Thanks for your input.

    I don't suppose you'd know recruiter e-mail addresses off the top
    of your head would you? I guess I'd start by sending them my resume.
    Also, would you know if it's a problem that I'm not a US citizen
    (I'm Canadian, currently doing post-doctoral work in the UK, and
    willing to move around).

    Thanks again,

    Brian

    "simon" <Sto@gtisd.com> wrote:
    >Brian,
    >
    >Your next move should be getting yourself down here in the Dallas-Fort Worth
    >area (if you are not here already), haha. Big corporations like Cisco,
    >Nortel, Acatel, etc etc are hiring software engineers like crazy here.

    They
    >never get enough of them. They actually have to go outside the country

    to
    >find people to work!!!
    >
    >Anyway, I suggest you to find yourself a few recruiters (never use just

    one)
    >and let them sell/market you. They work on commission and they will work
    >very hard for you. You don't have to do that yourself and that's the good
    >part of it. Those recruiters know the market. Sit down and talk to them
    >and they can assess your marketability.
    >
    >In my opinion, you are in pretty good shape. The only possible down-side
    >might be your PhD degree. It might create problem on your salary range.
    >Other than that, you should have no problem getting into the software
    >development profession.
    >
    >Hope this helps.
    >
    >simon.
    >
    >
    >
    >"Brian" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    >news:39f2fea4$1@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> like many of the other posts on this ng, I am also interested in switching
    >> careers.
    >> Now, I'm wondering what my next move should be.
    >>
    >> I currently have a PhD in biology. However, my PhD and my current post-doc
    >> has largely been
    >> focused on programming simulation models of biological processes (so I've
    >> been doing some
    >> programming for 6+ yrs). I realized quite early on that I enjoyed the

    >program
    >> development side of
    >> what I was doing. I started thinking about an alternative career path

    >(i.e.,
    >> software developer) and
    >> started to try to make my skills more marketable with respect to software
    >> development jobs. So
    >> I learnt C++ and Visual Basic, using the STL, making VB controls, DLLs,

    >and
    >> add-ins, general
    >> algorithms/data structures, etc. Further, because I would be switching

    >careers,
    >> I've also re-programmed
    >> a number of projects to demonstrate the type of programming I've been

    >doing
    >> (except in a
    >> graphical, user friendly way, rather than in the typical scientific

    >style).
    >> I've also refocused my
    >> resume and cover letter to highlight skills obtained wrt software

    >development
    >> and academic
    >> awards/honours (to show that I was not just scaping by), and de-emphasized
    >> much of the
    >> other things most relevant to biology.
    >>
    >> So my question is, what should my next move be? And also, how best to

    sell
    >> myself?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Brian
    >>

    >



  4. #4
    simon Guest

    Re: next move?

    Brian,

    Sorry I don't remember the recruiters' emails off the top of my head. I
    keep them at home. The recruiters I used are all in the Dallas-Fort Worth
    area. Therefore, unless you want to move here, they won't be useful to you.

    But if you are considering to move to the United States, I strongly
    recommend the Dallas-Fort Worth area in the great State Of Texas. This
    area is now ranked #3 in the entire US for computer jobs, after San Jose and
    Boston. And yet the cost of living here is much much lower than the other
    two. There is no state income tax in Texas. So you take home more money.
    The quality of living is very good, and this area is excellent for raising
    children (which is very important to me).

    As of the immigration issue, you have to discuss it with your recruiters.
    But I don't think there is a problem because we "import" many
    programmers/developers from India every year.

    You can post your resume on monster.com. It is still the biggest and most
    effective place on the Net. However, you have to screen the recruiters very
    carefully because you will run into some that maybe working out of their
    apartments.... if you know what I mean.

    Hope this helps and good luck on your job hunting.

    simon.



    "Brian Leung" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    news:39f448e2$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > Hi Simon,
    >
    > Thanks for your input.
    >
    > I don't suppose you'd know recruiter e-mail addresses off the top
    > of your head would you? I guess I'd start by sending them my resume.
    > Also, would you know if it's a problem that I'm not a US citizen
    > (I'm Canadian, currently doing post-doctoral work in the UK, and
    > willing to move around).
    >
    > Thanks again,
    >
    > Brian
    >
    > "simon" <Sto@gtisd.com> wrote:
    > >Brian,
    > >
    > >Your next move should be getting yourself down here in the Dallas-Fort

    Worth
    > >area (if you are not here already), haha. Big corporations like Cisco,
    > >Nortel, Acatel, etc etc are hiring software engineers like crazy here.

    > They
    > >never get enough of them. They actually have to go outside the country

    > to
    > >find people to work!!!
    > >
    > >Anyway, I suggest you to find yourself a few recruiters (never use just

    > one)
    > >and let them sell/market you. They work on commission and they will work
    > >very hard for you. You don't have to do that yourself and that's the

    good
    > >part of it. Those recruiters know the market. Sit down and talk to them
    > >and they can assess your marketability.
    > >
    > >In my opinion, you are in pretty good shape. The only possible down-side
    > >might be your PhD degree. It might create problem on your salary range.
    > >Other than that, you should have no problem getting into the software
    > >development profession.
    > >
    > >Hope this helps.
    > >
    > >simon.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >"Brian" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    > >news:39f2fea4$1@news.devx.com...
    > >>
    > >> Hi all,
    > >>
    > >> like many of the other posts on this ng, I am also interested in

    switching
    > >> careers.
    > >> Now, I'm wondering what my next move should be.
    > >>
    > >> I currently have a PhD in biology. However, my PhD and my current

    post-doc
    > >> has largely been
    > >> focused on programming simulation models of biological processes (so

    I've
    > >> been doing some
    > >> programming for 6+ yrs). I realized quite early on that I enjoyed the

    > >program
    > >> development side of
    > >> what I was doing. I started thinking about an alternative career path

    > >(i.e.,
    > >> software developer) and
    > >> started to try to make my skills more marketable with respect to

    software
    > >> development jobs. So
    > >> I learnt C++ and Visual Basic, using the STL, making VB controls, DLLs,

    > >and
    > >> add-ins, general
    > >> algorithms/data structures, etc. Further, because I would be switching

    > >careers,
    > >> I've also re-programmed
    > >> a number of projects to demonstrate the type of programming I've been

    > >doing
    > >> (except in a
    > >> graphical, user friendly way, rather than in the typical scientific

    > >style).
    > >> I've also refocused my
    > >> resume and cover letter to highlight skills obtained wrt software

    > >development
    > >> and academic
    > >> awards/honours (to show that I was not just scaping by), and

    de-emphasized
    > >> much of the
    > >> other things most relevant to biology.
    > >>
    > >> So my question is, what should my next move be? And also, how best to

    > sell
    > >> myself?
    > >>
    > >> Thanks,
    > >>
    > >> Brian
    > >>

    > >

    >



  5. #5
    Brian Leung Guest

    Re: next move?


    I'll definitely look into companies in Dallas.

    Cheers,

    Brian
    >
    >But if you are considering to move to the United States, I strongly
    >recommend the Dallas-Fort Worth area in the great State Of Texas. This
    >area is now ranked #3 in the entire US for computer jobs, after San Jose

    and
    >Boston. And yet the cost of living here is much much lower than the other
    >two. There is no state income tax in Texas. So you take home more money.
    >The quality of living is very good, and this area is excellent for raising
    >children (which is very important to me).
    >
    >As of the immigration issue, you have to discuss it with your recruiters.
    >But I don't think there is a problem because we "import" many
    >programmers/developers from India every year.
    >
    >You can post your resume on monster.com. It is still the biggest and most
    >effective place on the Net. However, you have to screen the recruiters

    very
    >carefully because you will run into some that maybe working out of their
    >apartments.... if you know what I mean.
    >
    >Hope this helps and good luck on your job hunting.
    >
    >simon.
    >
    >
    >
    >"Brian Leung" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    >news:39f448e2$1@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> Hi Simon,
    >>
    >> Thanks for your input.
    >>
    >> I don't suppose you'd know recruiter e-mail addresses off the top
    >> of your head would you? I guess I'd start by sending them my resume.
    >> Also, would you know if it's a problem that I'm not a US citizen
    >> (I'm Canadian, currently doing post-doctoral work in the UK, and
    >> willing to move around).
    >>
    >> Thanks again,
    >>
    >> Brian
    >>
    >> "simon" <Sto@gtisd.com> wrote:
    >> >Brian,
    >> >
    >> >Your next move should be getting yourself down here in the Dallas-Fort

    >Worth
    >> >area (if you are not here already), haha. Big corporations like Cisco,
    >> >Nortel, Acatel, etc etc are hiring software engineers like crazy here.

    >> They
    >> >never get enough of them. They actually have to go outside the country

    >> to
    >> >find people to work!!!
    >> >
    >> >Anyway, I suggest you to find yourself a few recruiters (never use just

    >> one)
    >> >and let them sell/market you. They work on commission and they will

    work
    >> >very hard for you. You don't have to do that yourself and that's the

    >good
    >> >part of it. Those recruiters know the market. Sit down and talk to

    them
    >> >and they can assess your marketability.
    >> >
    >> >In my opinion, you are in pretty good shape. The only possible down-side
    >> >might be your PhD degree. It might create problem on your salary range.
    >> >Other than that, you should have no problem getting into the software
    >> >development profession.
    >> >
    >> >Hope this helps.
    >> >
    >> >simon.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >"Brian" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    >> >news:39f2fea4$1@news.devx.com...
    >> >>
    >> >> Hi all,
    >> >>
    >> >> like many of the other posts on this ng, I am also interested in

    >switching
    >> >> careers.
    >> >> Now, I'm wondering what my next move should be.
    >> >>
    >> >> I currently have a PhD in biology. However, my PhD and my current

    >post-doc
    >> >> has largely been
    >> >> focused on programming simulation models of biological processes (so

    >I've
    >> >> been doing some
    >> >> programming for 6+ yrs). I realized quite early on that I enjoyed the
    >> >program
    >> >> development side of
    >> >> what I was doing. I started thinking about an alternative career path
    >> >(i.e.,
    >> >> software developer) and
    >> >> started to try to make my skills more marketable with respect to

    >software
    >> >> development jobs. So
    >> >> I learnt C++ and Visual Basic, using the STL, making VB controls, DLLs,
    >> >and
    >> >> add-ins, general
    >> >> algorithms/data structures, etc. Further, because I would be switching
    >> >careers,
    >> >> I've also re-programmed
    >> >> a number of projects to demonstrate the type of programming I've been
    >> >doing
    >> >> (except in a
    >> >> graphical, user friendly way, rather than in the typical scientific
    >> >style).
    >> >> I've also refocused my
    >> >> resume and cover letter to highlight skills obtained wrt software
    >> >development
    >> >> and academic
    >> >> awards/honours (to show that I was not just scaping by), and

    >de-emphasized
    >> >> much of the
    >> >> other things most relevant to biology.
    >> >>
    >> >> So my question is, what should my next move be? And also, how best

    to
    >> sell
    >> >> myself?
    >> >>
    >> >> Thanks,
    >> >>
    >> >> Brian
    >> >>
    >> >

    >>

    >



  6. #6
    Ian Hossie Guest

    Re: next move?


    "Brian Leung" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote:

    >Also, would you know if it's a problem that I'm not a US citizen
    >(I'm Canadian, currently doing post-doctoral work in the UK, and willing

    to move around).

    Brian, you wouldn't be related to Andy Leung, formerly of Victoria, would
    you? Ie:, his brother?

    Ian Hossie


  7. #7
    simon Guest

    Re: next move?

    Brian,

    When you decide to explore the opportunities in Dallas, let me know and I
    can provide you with some local recruiters. Take care.

    simon.



    "Brian Leung" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    news:39f4ca86$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > I'll definitely look into companies in Dallas.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Brian
    > >
    > >But if you are considering to move to the United States, I strongly
    > >recommend the Dallas-Fort Worth area in the great State Of Texas. This
    > >area is now ranked #3 in the entire US for computer jobs, after San Jose

    > and
    > >Boston. And yet the cost of living here is much much lower than the

    other
    > >two. There is no state income tax in Texas. So you take home more

    money.
    > >The quality of living is very good, and this area is excellent for

    raising
    > >children (which is very important to me).
    > >
    > >As of the immigration issue, you have to discuss it with your recruiters.
    > >But I don't think there is a problem because we "import" many
    > >programmers/developers from India every year.
    > >
    > >You can post your resume on monster.com. It is still the biggest and

    most
    > >effective place on the Net. However, you have to screen the recruiters

    > very
    > >carefully because you will run into some that maybe working out of their
    > >apartments.... if you know what I mean.
    > >
    > >Hope this helps and good luck on your job hunting.
    > >
    > >simon.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >"Brian Leung" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    > >news:39f448e2$1@news.devx.com...
    > >>
    > >> Hi Simon,
    > >>
    > >> Thanks for your input.
    > >>
    > >> I don't suppose you'd know recruiter e-mail addresses off the top
    > >> of your head would you? I guess I'd start by sending them my resume.
    > >> Also, would you know if it's a problem that I'm not a US citizen
    > >> (I'm Canadian, currently doing post-doctoral work in the UK, and
    > >> willing to move around).
    > >>
    > >> Thanks again,
    > >>
    > >> Brian
    > >>
    > >> "simon" <Sto@gtisd.com> wrote:
    > >> >Brian,
    > >> >
    > >> >Your next move should be getting yourself down here in the Dallas-Fort

    > >Worth
    > >> >area (if you are not here already), haha. Big corporations like

    Cisco,
    > >> >Nortel, Acatel, etc etc are hiring software engineers like crazy here.
    > >> They
    > >> >never get enough of them. They actually have to go outside the

    country
    > >> to
    > >> >find people to work!!!
    > >> >
    > >> >Anyway, I suggest you to find yourself a few recruiters (never use

    just
    > >> one)
    > >> >and let them sell/market you. They work on commission and they will

    > work
    > >> >very hard for you. You don't have to do that yourself and that's the

    > >good
    > >> >part of it. Those recruiters know the market. Sit down and talk to

    > them
    > >> >and they can assess your marketability.
    > >> >
    > >> >In my opinion, you are in pretty good shape. The only possible

    down-side
    > >> >might be your PhD degree. It might create problem on your salary

    range.
    > >> >Other than that, you should have no problem getting into the software
    > >> >development profession.
    > >> >
    > >> >Hope this helps.
    > >> >
    > >> >simon.
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >"Brian" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote in message
    > >> >news:39f2fea4$1@news.devx.com...
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Hi all,
    > >> >>
    > >> >> like many of the other posts on this ng, I am also interested in

    > >switching
    > >> >> careers.
    > >> >> Now, I'm wondering what my next move should be.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I currently have a PhD in biology. However, my PhD and my current

    > >post-doc
    > >> >> has largely been
    > >> >> focused on programming simulation models of biological processes (so

    > >I've
    > >> >> been doing some
    > >> >> programming for 6+ yrs). I realized quite early on that I enjoyed

    the
    > >> >program
    > >> >> development side of
    > >> >> what I was doing. I started thinking about an alternative career

    path
    > >> >(i.e.,
    > >> >> software developer) and
    > >> >> started to try to make my skills more marketable with respect to

    > >software
    > >> >> development jobs. So
    > >> >> I learnt C++ and Visual Basic, using the STL, making VB controls,

    DLLs,
    > >> >and
    > >> >> add-ins, general
    > >> >> algorithms/data structures, etc. Further, because I would be

    switching
    > >> >careers,
    > >> >> I've also re-programmed
    > >> >> a number of projects to demonstrate the type of programming I've

    been
    > >> >doing
    > >> >> (except in a
    > >> >> graphical, user friendly way, rather than in the typical scientific
    > >> >style).
    > >> >> I've also refocused my
    > >> >> resume and cover letter to highlight skills obtained wrt software
    > >> >development
    > >> >> and academic
    > >> >> awards/honours (to show that I was not just scaping by), and

    > >de-emphasized
    > >> >> much of the
    > >> >> other things most relevant to biology.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> So my question is, what should my next move be? And also, how best

    > to
    > >> sell
    > >> >> myself?
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Thanks,
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Brian
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >>

    > >

    >



  8. #8
    Brian Guest

    Re: next move?


    I don't think so (or at least definitely not his brother). I grew up
    in Vancouver though, which is very close to Victoria. Many Leungs there
    though.

    Cheers,

    Brian



    "Ian Hossie" <hossiid@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >"Brian Leung" <bleung@zoo.cam.ac.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>Also, would you know if it's a problem that I'm not a US citizen
    >>(I'm Canadian, currently doing post-doctoral work in the UK, and willing

    >to move around).
    >
    >Brian, you wouldn't be related to Andy Leung, formerly of Victoria, would
    >you? Ie:, his brother?
    >
    >Ian Hossie
    >



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