"Elena" <egermano@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>"Brian R." <CISconsultant@netscape.net> wrote:
>>
>>Okay, I am probably extending what you are saying with wishful thinking.
>> You say it detects browser types, okay. But does it convert MS HTML(DHTML)

>into the Netscape equivalent version?
>>

>
>Well, as I recall the original Netscape implementation of DHTML was a disaster.
> If netscape still can't handle DHTML properly, the .net framework can't
>override the browser's problems. (I'm not working with netscape at present
>so I can't say.) I was glossing over a big topic there so here's a specific
>definition of browser detection from MSDN website:
>
>===== quoted material ============================
>Uplevel and Downlevel Browser Capabilities
>
>Browsers and client devices are split into two distinctive groups: uplevel
>and downlevel. These groups define the type of native support a browser

or
>client device offers, and they generally determine the presentation and

behavior
>of a loading page from a Web server.
>
>Browsers and client devices that are considered uplevel usually support

at
>least the following:
>
>ECMAScript (JScript, JavaScript) version 1.2.
>HTML version 4.0
>The Microsoft Document Object Model (MSDOM)
>Cascading style sheets (CSS)
>
>
>Downlevel browsers and client devices support the following only:
>
>HTML version 3.2
>
>
>==== end quoted material ====================
>
>It then goes on to explain specific properties that don't render the same
>in HTML version 3.2 vs. 4.0 - - things like colors, borders, fonts, etc.
> If the framework detects a downlevel browser, it adjusts the HTML sent

back
>to the client accordingly.
>
>http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...pabilities.asp
>
>So I'm guessing it doesn't do everything you were hoping for . . .
>
>Elena
>


Elena,

"It then goes on to explain specific properties that don't render the same
in HTML version 3.2 vs. 4.0 - - things like colors, borders, fonts, etc.
If the framework detects a downlevel browser, it adjusts the HTML sent back
to the client accordingly. "

That is a very nice feature to have. Thank you for the other information
as well. I had overlooked that Javascript was an ECMA standard. Those layer
tags I referred to are classified as JASS (Java Accessible Style Sheets),
a functional equivalent to CSS from MS in some ways, but in other ways totally
different, namely the layer tag.

Microsoft floats the pictures into place with CSS, whereas with JASS,
you have to program a routine in javascript to do all of that moving around
of images programmatically. You use <layer></layer> tags to do this in JASS.
What do I know, I still haven't made it work, but I did show someone today
why their professionally done website was not working properly (All but
on of the .jpg photos for their web site didn't exist on the web server,
doh!).