resume


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  1. #1
    gary Guest

    resume


    About 10 years ago, I started an MS in Computer Science. I did OK, and got
    about a year of programming BASIC and PASCAL. I had to leave school due to
    family reasons, and when I went back, I went into teaching. I'm currently
    a HS math teacher, struggling to teach NYC gang members the stuff most of
    us learned by 6th grade. After reading about the cutbacks in the IT field,
    I guess that was a good decision after all.

    However, I have always maintained my interest in technology and computers.
    I would like to use this in my career, even if just a litte blurb on my resume.
    I hope this question won't offend the hard-working and dedicated IT pros
    on this site, but here goes. Are there any easy certifications I can get?
    Something impressive-sounding to the ignocenti, but not requiring too much
    time, money or energy? I've looked at A+, and it seems kinda do-able (maybe
    with a little more effort than I hoped). Anything even easier out there?
    Some junior programming certification without a junior sounding name?

    As much as I adore being surrounded by armed teenagers all day, I'm still
    hoping to do a little better for myself. Thanks for reading.



  2. #2
    Michael Gautier Guest

    Re: resume

    http://www.brainbench.com/xml/bb/homepage.xml

    "gary" <gwalsh2@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message news:3d8bff51$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > About 10 years ago, I started an MS in Computer Science. I did OK, and

    got
    > about a year of programming BASIC and PASCAL. I had to leave school due to
    > family reasons, and when I went back, I went into teaching. I'm currently
    > a HS math teacher, struggling to teach NYC gang members the stuff most of
    > us learned by 6th grade. After reading about the cutbacks in the IT

    field,
    > I guess that was a good decision after all.
    >
    > However, I have always maintained my interest in technology and computers.
    > I would like to use this in my career, even if just a litte blurb on my

    resume.
    > I hope this question won't offend the hard-working and dedicated IT pros
    > on this site, but here goes. Are there any easy certifications I can get?
    > Something impressive-sounding to the ignocenti, but not requiring too

    much
    > time, money or energy? I've looked at A+, and it seems kinda do-able

    (maybe
    > with a little more effort than I hoped). Anything even easier out there?
    > Some junior programming certification without a junior sounding name?
    >
    > As much as I adore being surrounded by armed teenagers all day, I'm still
    > hoping to do a little better for myself. Thanks for reading.
    >
    >




  3. #3
    Cmutt Guest

    Re: resume


    Mabye you should try to get a job as a teacher in the suburbs, but I read
    on another forum that BRAINBENCH maybe a waste of time and money. As a teacher
    you are already underpaid, as HI TECH worker given the current climate get
    ready to be grossly underpaid.

    "Michael Gautier" <gautier_michael@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >http://www.brainbench.com/xml/bb/homepage.xml
    >
    >"gary" <gwalsh2@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message news:3d8bff51$1@10.1.10.29...
    >>
    >> About 10 years ago, I started an MS in Computer Science. I did OK, and

    >got
    >> about a year of programming BASIC and PASCAL. I had to leave school due

    to
    >> family reasons, and when I went back, I went into teaching. I'm currently
    >> a HS math teacher, struggling to teach NYC gang members the stuff most

    of
    >> us learned by 6th grade. After reading about the cutbacks in the IT

    >field,
    >> I guess that was a good decision after all.
    >>
    >> However, I have always maintained my interest in technology and computers.
    >> I would like to use this in my career, even if just a litte blurb on my

    >resume.
    >> I hope this question won't offend the hard-working and dedicated IT pros
    >> on this site, but here goes. Are there any easy certifications I can

    get?
    >> Something impressive-sounding to the ignocenti, but not requiring too

    >much
    >> time, money or energy? I've looked at A+, and it seems kinda do-able

    >(maybe
    >> with a little more effort than I hoped). Anything even easier out there?
    >> Some junior programming certification without a junior sounding name?
    >>
    >> As much as I adore being surrounded by armed teenagers all day, I'm still
    >> hoping to do a little better for myself. Thanks for reading.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >



  4. #4
    simon Guest

    Re: resume


    Gary,

    I think you are a little bit confused here. Programming/application and
    network/desktop/hardware are two different professions. A+ Certification
    is for desktop support professionals only. It has nothing to do with programming.

    The first question to ask yourself is: Do I want to do software/application
    or do I want to do network/desktop/hardware?

    If you pick the latter, yes, you need certification big time. As a matter
    of fact, some companies may not even interview you if you don't have any
    of those Microsoft, Cisco, Novell certifications.

    On the other hand, programming is a totally different story. Not too many
    hiring managers care if you are certified or not. But they DO care if you
    have a degree in relevant field (there had been big discussion and disagreement
    on this matter and you can read that on the archive).

    Keep in mind that I am talking about in-house staff. Consulting work is
    not my cup of tea and I don't know much about it. I am sure someone else
    in the group will fill that in for you. Elena will be an excellent authority
    in that area.

    Now, let me give you some reality check here. In this economic down time
    and amidst of all the layoffs, companies are now looking for people with
    "real world" working experience almost everywhere you go. Certification
    is not going to help you if you don't have **recent** working experience.

    My advice to you is: When job market is bad, it is the perfect time to go
    back to school to finish your degree. By then, the market will be up and
    you will have better position to seek jobs.

    Just my $0.02.

    simon.



    "gary" <gwalsh2@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
    >
    >About 10 years ago, I started an MS in Computer Science. I did OK, and

    got
    >about a year of programming BASIC and PASCAL. I had to leave school due

    to
    >family reasons, and when I went back, I went into teaching. I'm currently
    >a HS math teacher, struggling to teach NYC gang members the stuff most of
    >us learned by 6th grade. After reading about the cutbacks in the IT field,
    >I guess that was a good decision after all.
    >
    >However, I have always maintained my interest in technology and computers.
    >I would like to use this in my career, even if just a litte blurb on my

    resume.
    >I hope this question won't offend the hard-working and dedicated IT pros
    >on this site, but here goes. Are there any easy certifications I can get?
    > Something impressive-sounding to the ignocenti, but not requiring too much
    >time, money or energy? I've looked at A+, and it seems kinda do-able (maybe
    >with a little more effort than I hoped). Anything even easier out there?
    > Some junior programming certification without a junior sounding name?
    >
    >As much as I adore being surrounded by armed teenagers all day, I'm still
    >hoping to do a little better for myself. Thanks for reading.
    >
    >



  5. #5
    Elena Guest

    Re: resume


    >> Consulting work is

    not my cup of tea and I don't know much about it. I am sure someone else
    in the group will fill that in for you. <<

    Well, I almost replied to this post a couple days ago but I wasn't clear
    on what you're actually looking for. Do you want an IT cert to use within
    your teaching career? With all the emphasis on using computers in the schools
    I can imagine this would be beneficial. Or, as Simon asked, are you looking
    to get into Network/Systems admin or software development?

    Elena

  6. #6
    gary Guest

    Re: resume


    "Elena" <egermano@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >>> Consulting work is

    >not my cup of tea and I don't know much about it. I am sure someone else
    >in the group will fill that in for you. <<
    >
    >Well, I almost replied to this post a couple days ago but I wasn't clear
    >on what you're actually looking for. Do you want an IT cert to use within
    >your teaching career? With all the emphasis on using computers in the schools
    >I can imagine this would be beneficial. Or, as Simon asked, are you looking
    >to get into Network/Systems admin or software development?
    >
    >Elena


    I meant to use withing a teaching career--with all the IT cutbacks, I think
    I'm safer where I am


  7. #7
    Elena Guest

    Re: resume


    "gary" <gwalsh2@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
    >I meant to use withing a teaching career--with all the IT cutbacks, I think
    >I'm safer where I am
    >


    In that case, I'm thinking that the type of tasks you would need to handle
    would be installing upgrades in hardware, upgrading the operating system,
    dealing with operating system installation problems, etc. In that case,
    a grad degree is overkill. The A+ cert is probably a good fit here. Although
    if your school system is heavily Apple rather than Intel the A+ might not
    be as applicable. The easy/hard question depends on how much time you've
    already spent tinkering with PC hardware.

    I imagine somewhere in the school system hierarchy are people that make decisions
    about what hardware and software to purchase. If you're thinking along those
    lines, then completing the grad degree might be best not because it's directly
    applicable, but because the academic hierarchy values advanced degrees in
    leadership positions. Of course, you would know the issues there better
    than I - - I've never worked in a school system!

    Elena

  8. #8
    Gary Guest

    Re: resume


    Thanks to you all for your help--and courtesy. Lots of times
    when you ask a question, someone uses it as an opportunity to
    call you stupid. Never seen it happen here.


    "Elena" <egermano@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >"gary" <gwalsh2@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
    >>I meant to use withing a teaching career--with all the IT cutbacks, I think
    >>I'm safer where I am
    >>

    >
    >In that case, I'm thinking that the type of tasks you would need to handle
    >would be installing upgrades in hardware, upgrading the operating system,
    >dealing with operating system installation problems, etc. In that case,
    >a grad degree is overkill. The A+ cert is probably a good fit here. Although
    >if your school system is heavily Apple rather than Intel the A+ might not
    >be as applicable. The easy/hard question depends on how much time you've
    >already spent tinkering with PC hardware.
    >
    >I imagine somewhere in the school system hierarchy are people that make

    decisions
    >about what hardware and software to purchase. If you're thinking along

    those
    >lines, then completing the grad degree might be best not because it's directly
    >applicable, but because the academic hierarchy values advanced degrees in
    >leadership positions. Of course, you would know the issues there better
    >than I - - I've never worked in a school system!
    >
    >Elena



  9. #9
    patch Guest

    Re: resume


    Gary wrote in message <3d94b0bd$1@10.1.10.29>...
    >
    >Thanks to you all for your help--and courtesy. Lots of times
    >when you ask a question, someone uses it as an opportunity to
    >call you stupid. Never seen it happen here.
    >


    I can well imagine that's due to the name.. I'm pretty sure most trolls or
    other highly flamable types are quite allergic to takin' advice... an
    attitude which probably keeps them from building a desent career.. so,
    "careers.advice" must be quite the turn-off to them...

    (sorry group, couldn't resist.. )

    patch



  10. #10
    Thaddeus Jacobs Guest

    Re: resume


    If I might interject, it would seem to me that your best bet is to pursue
    a career path that builds on your existing experience, the bulk of which
    it sounds like is teaching.

    Rural schools too hard? Try considering a relocation, maybe to a rural area.
    Salaries are sometimes less, but when you crossref that with lower living
    costs and better quality of family life, it's worth considering.

    Consider pursuing your schooling further to increase your credentials so
    you can eventually land a university job, as well as pursuing IT certifications.
    I'm a developer, and prefer programming over system administration, but
    I'm trying exploit a current opportunitie to increase my experience base
    in both fields, because I may change my mind down the road.

    If you do venture out into IT, you'll be starting off from square one, competing
    with kids just out of school who are willing to work for alot less than you
    make now.

    Perhaps you could get your IT certifications, and move towards a carreer
    teaching IT to others. You could get MCSE and A+ certified (MCSE is definitely
    quite an undertaking, but just an A+ might not be enough), and look for schools
    that have IT openings and part time teaching opportunities. Most high schools
    have limited budgets such that filling to jobs on on paycheck would be in
    their best interest. You'd still be building on your existing teaching career,
    while building an experience base in IT, thus increasing your future options
    without throwing your carreer flat on it's but. Probably far fetched, but
    I'm sure some school in this nation could use a IT certified teacher.

    Whatever you do, don't make a carreer switch just because IT is "HOT", because
    it's not a whole lot hotter than teaching. There is probably more demand
    for teachers (at least in my locale), though a definite lack of truly competent
    employees in either field.

    Consulting's always an option, but starting your own operation never having
    previously worked in a corporate IT department would be a blunder. I might
    consider starting my own firm in 5 or 10 years, but if I did so now and ended
    up having to get a stable job again, It would be a bit difficult to land
    another job as good as the one I have now.

    Of course all this is coming from a 20 year old MCP without a single college
    credit, so I'd take it with a grain of salt.

    Thaddeus Jacobs
    IT Developer
    Kinematic Automation, Inc.
    mailto:tjacobs@kinematic.com

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