VB.NET or C#


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Thread: VB.NET or C#

  1. #1
    Eric Reece Guest

    VB.NET or C#

    I know this has been posted before, but I lack the ambition to scroll
    through 15,000 + posts to find it. I've been working with VB since v5.0
    (oh, I go waaay back, eh?) If I'm going to spend the time learning the .NET
    framework and this new paradigm, why VB.NET? What the heck is the point?
    It seems to me that it makes too much sense to just learn C#. What is the
    difference between VB.NET and C# anyway(besides syntax?) Oh, and if it
    helps in your reply, I actually think the changes to VB are a good thing.
    And arguments about -1 = +1 = True are really missing the level of detail
    I'm at. I'm also not supporting any existing applications from previous
    versions of VB (I feel sorry for you guys.) Once my company gets our
    enterprise system completed sometime this year it will be the first
    real-world application I've been a part of that is in production. I don't
    think there is a snowball's chance in **** that my corporate America
    employer will every port over to .NET. So, I'm interested in it from a
    career standpoint. You know, improving myself so I don't have to have the
    same job for 40 years if I don't want to.

    P.S. I've read other posts and I'd prefer respondents who have a slightly
    smaller ego that the Microsoft hype surrounding .NET



  2. #2
    Bob Butler Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#


    "Eric Reece" <reeceer@home.com> wrote in message
    news:3a6d2de9$1@news.devx.com...
    > I know this has been posted before, but I lack the ambition to scroll
    > through 15,000 + posts to find it. I've been working with VB since v5.0
    > (oh, I go waaay back, eh?) If I'm going to spend the time learning the

    ..NET
    > framework and this new paradigm, why VB.NET? What the heck is the point?
    > It seems to me that it makes too much sense to just learn C#.


    The main points I'd consider if I were in the position you describe would
    be:
    * VB syntax vs C syntax vs Java or Delphi or..... what language are you most
    comfortable in
    * if other developers are involved what languages do they know/use/like
    * is the dotnet platform going to be stable and popular enough for the types
    of apps you do (web/client/client-server/...)
    * are you comfortable that VB.Net will not be totally revamped into
    something else in a few years




  3. #3
    Patrick Steele Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#

    In article <3a6db6dd@news.devx.com>, m1steele@ix.netcom.com says...
    > I read the WinForms are rendered in HTML


    Where did you read this??

    --
    Patrick Steele
    (psteele@ipdsolution.com)
    Lead Software Architect

  4. #4
    Steele Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#

    Not to mention that C# allows to you specify managed or unmanaged code. But
    a bigger issue for me is ASP+ vs. (C# or VB.Net). I read the WinForms are
    rendered in HTML if they is so then why wouldn't you just develop in VB.Net,
    C# or any other .Net Language. Why even bother with ASP+.


    "Eric Reece" <reeceer@home.com> wrote in message
    news:3a6d2de9$1@news.devx.com...
    > I know this has been posted before, but I lack the ambition to scroll
    > through 15,000 + posts to find it. I've been working with VB since v5.0
    > (oh, I go waaay back, eh?) If I'm going to spend the time learning the

    ..NET
    > framework and this new paradigm, why VB.NET? What the heck is the point?
    > It seems to me that it makes too much sense to just learn C#. What is the
    > difference between VB.NET and C# anyway(besides syntax?) Oh, and if it
    > helps in your reply, I actually think the changes to VB are a good thing.
    > And arguments about -1 = +1 = True are really missing the level of detail
    > I'm at. I'm also not supporting any existing applications from previous
    > versions of VB (I feel sorry for you guys.) Once my company gets our
    > enterprise system completed sometime this year it will be the first
    > real-world application I've been a part of that is in production. I don't
    > think there is a snowball's chance in **** that my corporate America
    > employer will every port over to .NET. So, I'm interested in it from a
    > career standpoint. You know, improving myself so I don't have to have the
    > same job for 40 years if I don't want to.
    >
    > P.S. I've read other posts and I'd prefer respondents who have a slightly
    > smaller ego that the Microsoft hype surrounding .NET
    >
    >




  5. #5
    Steele Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#

    Correction! I meant webForms



  6. #6
    Alvin Zhang Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#


    "Steele" <m1steele@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    news:3a6db6dd@news.devx.com...
    > Not to mention that C# allows to you specify managed or unmanaged code.

    Wrong, C# can only write managed code. But it can specify "unsafe" code.

    Alvin



  7. #7
    William Cleveland Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#

    Eric Reece wrote:
    >
    > I know this has been posted before, but I lack the ambition to scroll
    > through 15,000 + posts to find it. I've been working with VB since v5.0
    > (oh, I go waaay back, eh?) If I'm going to spend the time learning the .NET
    > framework and this new paradigm, why VB.NET? What the heck is the point?
    > It seems to me that it makes too much sense to just learn C#. What is the
    > difference between VB.NET and C# anyway(besides syntax?) Oh, and if it
    >


    As far as I can see, it's only a matter of taste in syntax. The
    official line I seem to hear for C# is something along the lines of
    "The power of C++, with the ease of use of VB". Comparing with VB6,
    that could certainly be true. However, I haven't read (admission: I
    haven't tried C#, yet) anything that would suggest to me that C#
    really is more powerful than VB7. Sure, you can have code sections
    that are plain C, but isn't mixing in C++ supposed to be easier in
    Studio 7, under .Net, anyway?

    My syntax preferences lie somewhere in between C/C++/Java/C#-style
    brackets and semicolons and VB/FORTRAN style line orientation and
    verbosity, so I don't really have a preference here. I'm
    concentrating on VB, though, because I expect my coworkers to prefer
    the VB style, for the most part (we're mainly a VB shop, although
    we've toyed with Java, VC++, and Delphi, from time to time), and C#
    seems too much like something Microsoft did on a whim. I don't have
    any confidence at all that it won't disappear, even as early as Visual
    Studio 8.

    Bill

  8. #8
    Kathleen Dollard-Joeris Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#

    Bill,

    FWIW, MS has made it a matter of syntax and a handful of features. But my
    son is trying to learn both, so I will share this with you (with a smile).
    Not being ancient like me and long used to keeping parens, hook dots, square
    brackets and curly brackets straight he insists on calling curly brackets
    "dangerous brackets" because of the pointy end. There you have it! VB does
    not have "dangerous brackets".

    --
    Kathleen
    (MS-MVP)
    Reply in the newsgroup so everyone can benefit
    --



  9. #9
    sathington_willoughby Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#


    > C# seems too much like something Microsoft did on a whim. I don't have
    > any confidence at all that it won't disappear, even as early as Visual
    > Studio 8.


    i feel c# is microsofts language of the future. it seems to me(i am now a
    .net veteran seeing as how i have been programming .net in a production environment
    for 2 entire months!) like once they had created c# they sat down and said,
    "ok, now how can we make vb do all this cool stuff?". i attended a vsconnections
    developers conference in november '00 which concluded with a full days worth
    of presentations from microsoft. they stated the source code of .net framework
    contains over one million lines of c# code. if you've used java and liked
    it you will like c# just as much, they are very similar. i originally learned
    java in preparation for learning vb.net (i read in the newsgroups this is
    how to prepare yourself). in november the company where i work needed to
    begin work immediately on a large scale application to be delivered in the
    second quarter of 2001. we had originally planned to use asp pages with vb
    com objects as the middle tier but we were disheartened about the lack of
    inheritance (yes i know you can do this in vb6 but its oh so painful) and
    function overloading. we had considered using c++ but there were only 2 people
    on our team well versed in c++ and i was definitely not one of them, i had
    just vfp and vb programming under my belt. after the developers conference
    and seeing what .net could do already we decided to dive in and go with .net
    using asp.net pages and either vb.net or c# for the middle tier. we then
    obtained a copy of the vs.net preview from the pdc and off we went. after
    creating some classes we needed in both c# and vb.net, then creating some
    fairly complex asp.net pages using both vb.net and c# as code behinds, our
    development team (5 of us) unanimously agreed to use c#. mostly it was for
    how clean c# looks compared to vb.net, vb.net seemed so overly verbose. if
    you are wondering what i mean by 'overly verbose' do what we did and create
    some fairly complex versions of an asp.net page in both languages and then
    count the characters. anyway, we are 2 months into our project and we are
    still very happy with our decision and very happy with the way vs.net beta
    is working out. sure you have to reboot every 5 or so hours but it just seems
    like you are using win95 again . i feel c# is just as powerful and useful
    as java with some nice touches and features that make it easier to learn
    and use(have you ever really tried to build a javabean?). i think microsoft's
    ability to develop superior ide's (vs.net) and the ease with which development
    teams will be able to develop in many different languages within the same
    .net project will sway a lot of non-ms developers.

  10. #10
    John Butler Guest

    Re: VB.NET or C#

    I hope that your project deliverable is only due after the commercial
    release of DotNet? Microsoft themselves and others in this forum have warned
    about using preproduction code for commercial purposes...you _could_ find
    yourselves rewriting sections if they decide to change things at the last
    minute. They've just done this with the whole Whistler interface, so it's
    possible...


    "sathington_willoughby" <sathington_willoughby@rocketmail.com> wrote in
    message news:3a7e5e8a$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > > C# seems too much like something Microsoft did on a whim. I don't have
    > > any confidence at all that it won't disappear, even as early as Visual
    > > Studio 8.

    >
    > i feel c# is microsofts language of the future. it seems to me(i am now a
    > net veteran seeing as how i have been programming .net in a production

    environment
    > for 2 entire months!) like once they had created c# they sat down and

    said,
    > "ok, now how can we make vb do all this cool stuff?". i attended a

    vsconnections
    > developers conference in november '00 which concluded with a full days

    worth
    > of presentations from microsoft. they stated the source code of .net

    framework
    > contains over one million lines of c# code. if you've used java and liked
    > it you will like c# just as much, they are very similar. i originally

    learned
    > java in preparation for learning vb.net (i read in the newsgroups this is
    > how to prepare yourself). in november the company where i work needed to
    > begin work immediately on a large scale application to be delivered in the
    > second quarter of 2001. we had originally planned to use asp pages with vb
    > com objects as the middle tier but we were disheartened about the lack of
    > inheritance (yes i know you can do this in vb6 but its oh so painful) and
    > function overloading. we had considered using c++ but there were only 2

    people
    > on our team well versed in c++ and i was definitely not one of them, i had
    > just vfp and vb programming under my belt. after the developers conference
    > and seeing what .net could do already we decided to dive in and go with

    ..net
    > using asp.net pages and either vb.net or c# for the middle tier. we then
    > obtained a copy of the vs.net preview from the pdc and off we went. after
    > creating some classes we needed in both c# and vb.net, then creating some
    > fairly complex asp.net pages using both vb.net and c# as code behinds, our
    > development team (5 of us) unanimously agreed to use c#. mostly it was for
    > how clean c# looks compared to vb.net, vb.net seemed so overly verbose. if
    > you are wondering what i mean by 'overly verbose' do what we did and

    create
    > some fairly complex versions of an asp.net page in both languages and then
    > count the characters. anyway, we are 2 months into our project and we are
    > still very happy with our decision and very happy with the way vs.net beta
    > is working out. sure you have to reboot every 5 or so hours but it just

    seems
    > like you are using win95 again . i feel c# is just as powerful and

    useful
    > as java with some nice touches and features that make it easier to learn
    > and use(have you ever really tried to build a javabean?). i think

    microsoft's
    > ability to develop superior ide's (vs.net) and the ease with which

    development
    > teams will be able to develop in many different languages within the same
    > net project will sway a lot of non-ms developers.




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