The question asked a million times


DevX Home    Today's Headlines   Articles Archive   Tip Bank   Forums   

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: The question asked a million times

  1. #1
    Andrew Guest

    The question asked a million times


    While were on the subject of switching to JavaÖ I am a VB, Oracle developer
    looking to add a new language to my skill set. I have been bouncing back
    and forth on whether to learn Java or C++. I have taken courses in both
    and find Java more rewarding. My only concern is will it sustain its growth
    pattern. Iíve found a few studies that say itís here to stay and others,
    at DevX, that say it will be relegated to minor middleware projects. I
    guess Iím looking for assurance so I donít spend the next 6 months learning
    something that will be of little value like is college we they made you learn
    Assembly, COBOL etcÖ

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Javier Estrada Guest

    Re: The question asked a million times


    "Andrew" <mclellan_a@nospanYahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >While were on the subject of switching to JavaÖ I am a VB, Oracle developer
    >looking to add a new language to my skill set. I have been bouncing back
    >and forth on whether to learn Java or C++. I have taken courses in both
    >and find Java more rewarding. My only concern is will it sustain its growth
    >pattern. Iíve found a few studies that say itís here to stay and others,
    >at DevX, that say it will be relegated to minor middleware projects. I
    >guess Iím looking for assurance so I donít spend the next 6 months learning
    >something that will be of little value like is college we they made you

    learn
    >Assembly, COBOL etcÖ
    >
    >Thanks


    I guess that it depends on what you do. In our environment we don't use
    Java, and even though I have spent time learning it, I don't think I'll ever
    use it there. I guess that it's also difficult to use Java if you work in
    a Windows-only environment, particularly because most of the tools out there
    for Windows are mature and do the job really well. If you have a user and
    password for the devx zone you'll be able to read an interesting interview
    with Bjarne Stroustrup, the creator of C++. He's got very solid points in
    his answers, and according to him, C++ base is growing up.

    So, in essence, my advice is to project your future for the next year and
    pick the language that will give you the most bang for your minutes.

    Hope it helps. :~)


  3. #3
    Vikram Rajan Guest

    Re: The question asked a million times


    Java is here to stay and grow. This not only because of its characteristics
    - portable, object-oriented.. blah blah blah, but also due to the manner
    in which it is growing. For example, the Java2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE)
    defines a set of specifications which are being implemented by vendors like
    IBM, Sybase, Weblogic etc. So as long as Java develops is a community process,
    it is unstoppable. This is exactly where it scores over Microsoft technologies
    which are tied down to one platform.

    Let me give you an example which should settle your uncertainity once and
    for all:
    Let us suppose that you develop a server side application for the internet
    which uses Oracle RDMBS, IBM WebSphere Application Server, Domino GoServer
    as the webserver - all running on Sun Solaris OS.
    Due to a change in requirements (or just for the heck of it), all the products
    are changed. The RDBMS is now Sybase Release 10, Weblogic Application server
    and a Windows NT OS.

    If the application that you have developed is in J2EE, you do not have to
    change a single line of code. Just start using your application.
    Is that possible with VC or VB? You tell me.

    Bye,
    V

  4. #4
    Andrew Guest

    Re: The question asked a million times


    Thanks Vikram

    "Vikram Rajan" <vikramr@planetasia.com> wrote:
    >
    >Java is here to stay and grow. This not only because of its characteristics
    >- portable, object-oriented.. blah blah blah, but also due to the manner
    >in which it is growing. For example, the Java2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE)
    >defines a set of specifications which are being implemented by vendors like
    >IBM, Sybase, Weblogic etc. So as long as Java develops is a community process,
    >it is unstoppable. This is exactly where it scores over Microsoft technologies
    >which are tied down to one platform.
    >
    >Let me give you an example which should settle your uncertainity once and
    >for all:
    >Let us suppose that you develop a server side application for the internet
    >which uses Oracle RDMBS, IBM WebSphere Application Server, Domino GoServer
    >as the webserver - all running on Sun Solaris OS.
    >Due to a change in requirements (or just for the heck of it), all the products
    >are changed. The RDBMS is now Sybase Release 10, Weblogic Application server
    >and a Windows NT OS.
    >
    >If the application that you have developed is in J2EE, you do not have to
    >change a single line of code. Just start using your application.
    >Is that possible with VC or VB? You tell me.
    >
    >Bye,
    >V



  5. #5
    David Guest

    Re: The question asked a million times


    You need to optimize for a certain setup and/or configuration.
    You can't say java is quicker than native C code. You build VC/VB COM apps
    (web pages) that run native in NT/2000 for optimized speed, memory utilization,
    and database access. Which is faster: scripting or compiled? We all know
    the answer to that.


    "Vikram Rajan" <vikramr@planetasia.com> wrote:
    >
    >Java is here to stay and grow. This not only because of its characteristics
    >- portable, object-oriented.. blah blah blah, but also due to the manner
    >in which it is growing. For example, the Java2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE)
    >defines a set of specifications which are being implemented by vendors like
    >IBM, Sybase, Weblogic etc. So as long as Java develops is a community process,
    >it is unstoppable. This is exactly where it scores over Microsoft technologies
    >which are tied down to one platform.
    >
    >Let me give you an example which should settle your uncertainity once and
    >for all:
    >Let us suppose that you develop a server side application for the internet
    >which uses Oracle RDMBS, IBM WebSphere Application Server, Domino GoServer
    >as the webserver - all running on Sun Solaris OS.
    >Due to a change in requirements (or just for the heck of it), all the products
    >are changed. The RDBMS is now Sybase Release 10, Weblogic Application server
    >and a Windows NT OS.
    >
    >If the application that you have developed is in J2EE, you do not have to
    >change a single line of code. Just start using your application.
    >Is that possible with VC or VB? You tell me.
    >
    >Bye,
    >V



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
HTML5 Development Center
 
 
FAQ
Latest Articles
Java
.NET
XML
Database
Enterprise
Questions? Contact us.
C++
Web Development
Wireless
Latest Tips
Open Source


   Development Centers

   -- Android Development Center
   -- Cloud Development Project Center
   -- HTML5 Development Center
   -- Windows Mobile Development Center