When do we use Servlets vs JSP/JavaBean


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Thread: When do we use Servlets vs JSP/JavaBean

  1. #1
    Hari Guest

    When do we use Servlets vs JSP/JavaBean


    Hi,

    I am a newbie in the Java development. I read about developing web applications
    using Servlets as well as JSP/JavaBeans. Which approach is more flexible
    in developing web application? What are the advantages of one over the other?


    I would appreciate your comments on this or let me know where I can get more
    information about comparison of these two techniques.

    thanks
    Hari

  2. #2
    KJ Guest

    Re: When do we use Servlets vs JSP/JavaBean


    "Hari" <haris1@avaya.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hi,
    >
    >I am a newbie in the Java development. I read about developing web applications
    >using Servlets as well as JSP/JavaBeans. Which approach is more flexible
    >in developing web application? What are the advantages of one over the other?
    >
    >
    >I would appreciate your comments on this or let me know where I can get

    more
    >information about comparison of these two techniques.
    >
    >thanks
    >Hari


    I am also relatively new to EJB and related technologies, but I will give
    you my opinions. Using Servlets to process client requests (http get, put,
    or post), and returning the response to a jsp to generate the dynamic content
    is a pretty simple technique, however I have found with some web servers
    servlets are not as easy to work with as jsp's (configuring), so the method
    I use is similar to the method described in the J2EE blueprints (which can
    be downloaded from java.sun.com/j2ee). I actually use a simplified version
    in which a jsp works directly with a JavaBean using the useBean tag. I like
    the way jsp's work with JavaBeans, they allow you to access properties directly
    using the getProperty and setProperty tags. When accessing the properties,
    the jsp container converts the types for you (Strings on the jsp side, and
    native java types on the bean side), this makes it pretty smooth. I use
    the above mentioned JavaBean to talk directly to the controller (a session
    bean), which in turn talks to the model (entity beans).

    I don't know if this is any help.

    KJ


  3. #3
    Vikram Rajan Guest

    Re: When do we use Servlets vs JSP/JavaBean


    hi,

    Adding to what KJ says (which I completely agree with) ...

    In most web development environments, the HTML/Graphic designer and the application
    developer work in co-ordination. The former make the HTMLs templates and
    the latter add the application support to the templates. In this scenario,
    working with JSPs are a lot easier than working with servlets. You are basically
    restricting the out.println() usage to dynamic content only. So both can
    work on the same page copy.

    There are a few other considerations:
    Java Server Pages ultimately are compiled into servlets by the application
    server. So in effect you are maintaining 2 copies of the same file ... one
    is the source JSP and the other is the compiled servlet. This doubles the
    disk space usage.

    Servlets lend themselves better for business logic than presentation. JSPs
    are better for presentation. So your presentation logic should ideally exist
    in JSPs while Servlets and EJBs handle the business logic.


    Vikram

  4. #4
    Fernando Ribeiro Guest

    Re: When do we use Servlets vs JSP/JavaBean


    Mixing presentation logic with the business logic (lets name it this way)
    has never been a great idea. Checking if the user is authorized to see this
    or that HTML block should not be mixed with the code that actually executes
    a stored procedure in a remote Oracle8i database server and returns an output
    parameter which value is compared to something bound to the HTTP session
    to check if the user is authorized or not.

    This weird example is a usual mistake.

    Hope that helps,

    Fernando Ribeiro
    fribeiro

    "Vikram Rajan" <vikramr@planetasia.com> wrote:
    >
    >hi,
    >
    >Adding to what KJ says (which I completely agree with) ...
    >
    >In most web development environments, the HTML/Graphic designer and the

    application
    >developer work in co-ordination. The former make the HTMLs templates and
    >the latter add the application support to the templates. In this scenario,
    >working with JSPs are a lot easier than working with servlets. You are basically
    >restricting the out.println() usage to dynamic content only. So both can
    >work on the same page copy.
    >
    >There are a few other considerations:
    >Java Server Pages ultimately are compiled into servlets by the application
    >server. So in effect you are maintaining 2 copies of the same file ... one
    >is the source JSP and the other is the compiled servlet. This doubles the
    >disk space usage.
    >
    >Servlets lend themselves better for business logic than presentation. JSPs
    >are better for presentation. So your presentation logic should ideally exist
    >in JSPs while Servlets and EJBs handle the business logic.
    >
    >
    >Vikram



  5. #5
    Harpreet Singh Guest

    Re: When do we use Servlets vs JSP/JavaBean


    It is hard to say what is a best to use. Ideally speaking in enterprise wide
    system I would use all the three. EJB, Servlets and JPS together can be used
    effectively to respresent the MVC architecture. The servlet should ideally
    be used as a controller that triggers off a change in view or in the model
    based on a user action. EJB forms the model and JSP forms the view.

    -Harpreet

    "Fernando Ribeiro" <fribeiro@bol.com.br> wrote:
    >
    >Mixing presentation logic with the business logic (lets name it this way)
    >has never been a great idea. Checking if the user is authorized to see this
    >or that HTML block should not be mixed with the code that actually executes
    >a stored procedure in a remote Oracle8i database server and returns an output
    >parameter which value is compared to something bound to the HTTP session
    >to check if the user is authorized or not.
    >
    >This weird example is a usual mistake.
    >
    >Hope that helps,
    >
    >Fernando Ribeiro
    >fribeiro
    >
    >"Vikram Rajan" <vikramr@planetasia.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>hi,
    >>
    >>Adding to what KJ says (which I completely agree with) ...
    >>
    >>In most web development environments, the HTML/Graphic designer and the

    >application
    >>developer work in co-ordination. The former make the HTMLs templates and
    >>the latter add the application support to the templates. In this scenario,
    >>working with JSPs are a lot easier than working with servlets. You are

    basically
    >>restricting the out.println() usage to dynamic content only. So both can
    >>work on the same page copy.
    >>
    >>There are a few other considerations:
    >>Java Server Pages ultimately are compiled into servlets by the application
    >>server. So in effect you are maintaining 2 copies of the same file ...

    one
    >>is the source JSP and the other is the compiled servlet. This doubles the
    >>disk space usage.
    >>
    >>Servlets lend themselves better for business logic than presentation. JSPs
    >>are better for presentation. So your presentation logic should ideally

    exist
    >>in JSPs while Servlets and EJBs handle the business logic.
    >>
    >>
    >>Vikram

    >



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