tips/ strategies for java training?


DevX Home    Today's Headlines   Articles Archive   Tip Bank   Forums   

Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: tips/ strategies for java training?

  1. #1
    gene Guest

    tips/ strategies for java training?


    hi all,

    i'm a client-side web (developer? designer? don't know anymore) with a fair
    amount of server-side experience (ASP, some PHP, a little JSP) and found
    myself with what i now consider to be a too-light skill set. the bay area
    is awash in web developers now and no jobs for them, unlike 6 months ago.
    anyway, i've determined that java is the way to go for me as i know i could
    find employment immediately if i had that kind of experience. i have a great
    book (java: how to program by deitel & deitel) but know i need to get certified
    (right?) and for that i feel i need a class.

    so.

    has anyone gone through this recently? i'm not an absolute newbie, so i'm
    hoping to skip the general computing classes, and hope to skip a whole class
    devoted to OOP (although i know this would be a good idea) and get right
    into java. i would appreciate any thoughts anyone could give me as to what
    they liked or disliked about obtaining gainful java/jsp employment.

    thanks!
    gene

  2. #2
    Kyle Gabhart Guest

    Re: tips/ strategies for java training?


    "gene" <gene@gknow.com> wrote:
    >
    >hi all,
    >
    >i'm a client-side web (developer? designer? don't know anymore) with a fair
    >amount of server-side experience (ASP, some PHP, a little JSP) and found
    >myself with what i now consider to be a too-light skill set. the bay area
    >is awash in web developers now and no jobs for them, unlike 6 months ago.
    >anyway, i've determined that java is the way to go for me as i know i could
    >find employment immediately if i had that kind of experience. i have a great
    >book (java: how to program by deitel & deitel) but know i need to get certified
    >(right?) and for that i feel i need a class.
    >
    >so.
    >
    >has anyone gone through this recently? i'm not an absolute newbie, so i'm
    >hoping to skip the general computing classes, and hope to skip a whole class
    >devoted to OOP (although i know this would be a good idea) and get right
    >into java. i would appreciate any thoughts anyone could give me as to what
    >they liked or disliked about obtaining gainful java/jsp employment.
    >
    >thanks!
    >gene



    Gene,

    Excellent choice! Server-side Java is a very exciting and rewarding career
    move. As a Java instructor, courseware developer, author and consultant,
    I have several recommendations for you.

    1. Burn the Deitel & Deitel book. Those slackers took their C++ book, changed
    the syntax and some of the terminology and resold it as a Java book. As
    a strong introductory book, I recommend one of two books: 1) Beginning Java
    2 by Ivor Horton or 2) Thinking in Java by Bruce Eckel. Both of these
    books provide a solid, thorough foundation in Java and especially OOP. Whichever
    book you go with, just skip the GUI and multimedia chapters. You can get
    a free electronic copy of Eckel's book at: http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/
    . (My personal favorite is Horton's book).

    2. Brush up on your JSP and learn as much as you can about JDBC, multi-threading,
    servlets, and distributed computing (RMI, CORBA, JNDI). For this I recommend
    "Professional Java Server Programming: J2EE Edition" by Wrox Press. This
    book covers all the key aspects of server-side Java. It covers the core aspects
    of server-side Java, as well as more advanced distributed computing technologies
    including EJB. It's not necessary to be an expert in distributed computing
    technologies, but it's important to be familiar with them. They are much
    more advanced, and you can build those skills more on the job.

    3. Learn as much as you can about the server-side manipulation of XML. XML
    is an entirely different animal in the server-side realm. Study DOM, SAX,
    JAXP, and JDOM. "Java and XML" by Brent McLaughlin is an excellent text.


    4. Try yourself out on Brainbench certification tests first (http://www.brainbench.com).
    These exams only cost $ 20 and are a good way to gauge how your learning
    is going. Eventually, Sun Java Certification is a good idea. Traditionally,
    employers have not been very concerned with Java developers being certified,
    but as you noted in your post, the market has changed...

    I hope that these suggestions are helpful. I wish you all the best. If
    you have any additional questions or need clarification, feel free to post
    a follow-up question or e-mail me directly.

    Cordially,

    Kyle Gabhart
    DevX Java Pro


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
HTML5 Development Center
 
 
FAQ
Latest Articles
Java
.NET
XML
Database
Enterprise
Questions? Contact us.
C++
Web Development
Wireless
Latest Tips
Open Source


   Development Centers

   -- Android Development Center
   -- Cloud Development Project Center
   -- HTML5 Development Center
   -- Windows Mobile Development Center