Learning Java


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Thread: Learning Java

  1. #1
    Mike Guest

    Learning Java

    I'm in the process of learning Java and I'm debating on whether to take a
    class or buy some books on Java and learn that way. I've learned VB, ASP,
    JavaScript, SQL, etc. on my own and then creating projects using them
    technologies. Is Java something I can learn on my own or would a class be
    better or even a self paced at home type of class?


    any suggestions



  2. #2
    Volker Held Guest

    Re: Learning Java

    Mike wrote:
    > I'm in the process of learning Java and I'm debating on whether to take a
    > class or buy some books on Java and learn that way. I've learned VB, ASP,
    > JavaScript, SQL, etc. on my own and then creating projects using them
    > technologies. Is Java something I can learn on my own or would a class be
    > better or even a self paced at home type of class?
    >
    >
    > any suggestions
    >
    >
    >


    Since you coded in VB already you had a first glimpse at objects - even
    if VB is object-based ( generally spoken - it just uses a bunch of
    objects ) and Java is truly object-oriented ( thus you work with
    inheritance and the like ).

    If you have the money and the time - take the class, itīs always better
    to have an mentor with some experience ( i know some of you would
    disagree ). Anyway you can still teach Java yourself, the basics are
    pretty easy to understand, problem comes when you advance to fields like
    "Threads"s.

    I do recommend you the book "Learning Java" from OīReilly for
    introduction to this great language - even if it would be good if youīve
    had experience with C or C++ ( in a twisted way you had - at least
    syntax related when working with JavaScript - but remember Java is NOT
    JavaScript - they are different like **** and heaven ).

    Javaīs cool, Javaīs easier than C++ ( talking about the object-related
    approach ) and itīs real fun. Just try it out

    One last thing - i do recommend that you donīt use an IDE while
    "Learning Java" - itīs my experience you get way more out of a language
    when you donīt stick to code-completing MS etc. applications.
    Use a simple text editor or Emacs or JEdit for example and compile on
    you shell.
    ( i know this might s*** at first, i learned VB before i came to C - VB
    had this wonderful(?) MS IDE and C we did in Emacs only - I dare to say
    that i gained a much more fundamental understanding of C because of the
    fact we were using no IDE )

    erm ... sorry... i canīt ever be short and precise, but i just hope this
    helps your choice a bit


  3. #3
    Mike Guest

    Re: Learning Java

    Thanks, it's good information. I'm actually using JCreator for my java code.
    Which is good, it makes code everything unlike JBuilder where most of the
    code exist already for ya.

    thanks for the info



    "Volker Held" <vheld@gwdg.de> wrote in message
    news:3CF47259.1090501@gwdg.de...
    > Mike wrote:
    > > I'm in the process of learning Java and I'm debating on whether to take

    a
    > > class or buy some books on Java and learn that way. I've learned VB,

    ASP,
    > > JavaScript, SQL, etc. on my own and then creating projects using them
    > > technologies. Is Java something I can learn on my own or would a class

    be
    > > better or even a self paced at home type of class?
    > >
    > >
    > > any suggestions
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Since you coded in VB already you had a first glimpse at objects - even
    > if VB is object-based ( generally spoken - it just uses a bunch of
    > objects ) and Java is truly object-oriented ( thus you work with
    > inheritance and the like ).
    >
    > If you have the money and the time - take the class, itīs always better
    > to have an mentor with some experience ( i know some of you would
    > disagree ). Anyway you can still teach Java yourself, the basics are
    > pretty easy to understand, problem comes when you advance to fields like
    > "Threads"s.
    >
    > I do recommend you the book "Learning Java" from OīReilly for
    > introduction to this great language - even if it would be good if youīve
    > had experience with C or C++ ( in a twisted way you had - at least
    > syntax related when working with JavaScript - but remember Java is NOT
    > JavaScript - they are different like **** and heaven ).
    >
    > Javaīs cool, Javaīs easier than C++ ( talking about the object-related
    > approach ) and itīs real fun. Just try it out
    >
    > One last thing - i do recommend that you donīt use an IDE while
    > "Learning Java" - itīs my experience you get way more out of a language
    > when you donīt stick to code-completing MS etc. applications.
    > Use a simple text editor or Emacs or JEdit for example and compile on
    > you shell.
    > ( i know this might s*** at first, i learned VB before i came to C - VB
    > had this wonderful(?) MS IDE and C we did in Emacs only - I dare to say
    > that i gained a much more fundamental understanding of C because of the
    > fact we were using no IDE )
    >
    > erm ... sorry... i canīt ever be short and precise, but i just hope this
    > helps your choice a bit
    >




  4. #4
    MarkN Guest

    Re: Learning Java


    Mike,
    Depends on where the course is. If it is from a college, etc I wouldn't
    waste my time. Typically these course are teaching programming and not the
    language. So alot of time is 'wasted' explaning basic concepts again and
    again and again ... . If the course is from IBM or Sun then maybe. I would
    reserve my money for classes on EJBs, MQSeries, etc if even any of these.

    Mark

  5. #5
    Mike Guest

    Re: Learning Java

    I'm looking into a class offered from EduDirect in Scranton PA. I spoke with
    a couple of students that took the course and they said it's covers alot
    from applets (which I know) to JDBC and using Java for networking (which I
    don't know). I don't have time to sit in a class room so this course allows
    me to take it from home and provides Profs. support and hands on labs and
    projects, which I can't really find a book to Explain everything while in
    the process of building an actual application using JDBC or Networking or
    anything of that nature. If anyone know any good books that explains Java
    and walks you through building an actual application or applet, please
    inform me of it.

    thanks




    "MarkN" <java.@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:3cf4e2c5$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > Mike,
    > Depends on where the course is. If it is from a college, etc I

    wouldn't
    > waste my time. Typically these course are teaching programming and not

    the
    > language. So alot of time is 'wasted' explaning basic concepts again and
    > again and again ... . If the course is from IBM or Sun then maybe. I

    would
    > reserve my money for classes on EJBs, MQSeries, etc if even any of these.
    >
    > Mark




  6. #6
    Volker Held Guest

    Re: Learning Java

    Sounds not too bad at all, but i have to agree with MarkN - the basics
    up to JDBC and Networking - you can teach yourself. Enterprise Java
    Beans ( EJBīs ), Threads etc. are quite more difficult - so thereīs were
    to put the money to get most out of your the time and cash you may spent...
    On the other hand a java coder you can always ask comes in handy once
    you are stuck somewhere - and there is of course the newsgroup. *g*

    In the end... itīs your call...

    Mike wrote:
    > I'm looking into a class offered from EduDirect in Scranton PA. I spoke with
    > a couple of students that took the course and they said it's covers alot
    > from applets (which I know) to JDBC and using Java for networking (which I
    > don't know). I don't have time to sit in a class room so this course allows
    > me to take it from home and provides Profs. support and hands on labs and
    > projects, which I can't really find a book to Explain everything while in
    > the process of building an actual application using JDBC or Networking or
    > anything of that nature. If anyone know any good books that explains Java
    > and walks you through building an actual application or applet, please
    > inform me of it.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "MarkN" <java.@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:3cf4e2c5$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    >>Mike,
    >> Depends on where the course is. If it is from a college, etc I
    >>

    > wouldn't
    >
    >>waste my time. Typically these course are teaching programming and not
    >>

    > the
    >
    >>language. So alot of time is 'wasted' explaning basic concepts again and
    >>again and again ... . If the course is from IBM or Sun then maybe. I
    >>

    > would
    >
    >>reserve my money for classes on EJBs, MQSeries, etc if even any of these.
    >>
    >>Mark
    >>

    >
    >




  7. #7
    MarkN Guest

    Re: Learning Java


    Another thing, if you are really considering taking the course - find out
    more about the professor. Does he/she use Java 'daily', how long, where,
    and what types of projects. One of the guys I work with took a Java 'course'
    and the guy teaching the course knew very little about Java (from what I
    could gather). It was a waste of his time and left a bad taste in his mouth.
    When you say "take it from home", do you mean at your own pace - no class
    time? If so, I see no reason to take this course because as Volker said,
    you can get help from newsgroups.

    Mark


  8. #8
    Mike Guest

    Re: Learning Java

    I could either go into the school or learn it with a self paced way. I will
    learn the samethings jsut at home at my own pace. And I will have access to
    the prof the entire time I'm taking the course. The only difference is I'm
    taken it at home instead of a classroom.





    "MarkN" <java.@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:3cf61f9e$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > Another thing, if you are really considering taking the course - find out
    > more about the professor. Does he/she use Java 'daily', how long, where,
    > and what types of projects. One of the guys I work with took a Java

    'course'
    > and the guy teaching the course knew very little about Java (from what I
    > could gather). It was a waste of his time and left a bad taste in his

    mouth.
    > When you say "take it from home", do you mean at your own pace - no class
    > time? If so, I see no reason to take this course because as Volker said,
    > you can get help from newsgroups.
    >
    > Mark
    >




  9. #9
    Volker Held Guest

    Re: Learning Java

    Iīd suggest you try it the hard way and become a self-made java
    programmer!

    Ah well, i guess the school thing will earn you a certificate of some
    kind.. but from my experience those are close to useless - at least over
    here in Germany...
    If you have the time and dicipline to do it yourself, save the money and
    ask the board if you are stuck. Of course thatīs only a suggestion...
    itīs your choice.

    Okay - enough of that! The answer is out there Mike... go on your
    mission, to boldly code where no one has ever coded before!

    P.S. Ignore the last two lines.

    Volker

    Mike wrote:
    > I could either go into the school or learn it with a self paced way. I will
    > learn the samethings jsut at home at my own pace. And I will have access to
    > the prof the entire time I'm taking the course. The only difference is I'm
    > taken it at home instead of a classroom.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "MarkN" <java.@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:3cf61f9e$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    >>Another thing, if you are really considering taking the course - find out
    >>more about the professor. Does he/she use Java 'daily', how long, where,
    >>and what types of projects. One of the guys I work with took a Java
    >>

    > 'course'
    >
    >>and the guy teaching the course knew very little about Java (from what I
    >>could gather). It was a waste of his time and left a bad taste in his
    >>

    > mouth.
    >
    >> When you say "take it from home", do you mean at your own pace - no class
    >>time? If so, I see no reason to take this course because as Volker said,
    >>you can get help from newsgroups.
    >>
    >>Mark
    >>
    >>

    >
    >




  10. #10
    Mike Guest

    Re: Learning Java

    I would like to thank you guys on the information you provided to me. Since
    I've all the other languages on my own via books and online tuturiols, I
    think to get a better understanding of the Java Technology not just the
    language I'm going to start with the class. If the prof starts to wonder,
    then my Borders Bookstore will be my class of choice.

    thanks again



    "Volker Held" <vheld@gwdg.de> wrote in message
    news:3CF64E6A.60508@gwdg.de...
    > Iīd suggest you try it the hard way and become a self-made java
    > programmer!
    >
    > Ah well, i guess the school thing will earn you a certificate of some
    > kind.. but from my experience those are close to useless - at least over
    > here in Germany...
    > If you have the time and dicipline to do it yourself, save the money and
    > ask the board if you are stuck. Of course thatīs only a suggestion...
    > itīs your choice.
    >
    > Okay - enough of that! The answer is out there Mike... go on your
    > mission, to boldly code where no one has ever coded before!
    >
    > P.S. Ignore the last two lines.
    >
    > Volker
    >
    > Mike wrote:
    > > I could either go into the school or learn it with a self paced way. I

    will
    > > learn the samethings jsut at home at my own pace. And I will have access

    to
    > > the prof the entire time I'm taking the course. The only difference is

    I'm
    > > taken it at home instead of a classroom.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "MarkN" <java.@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:3cf61f9e$1@10.1.10.29...
    > >
    > >>Another thing, if you are really considering taking the course - find

    out
    > >>more about the professor. Does he/she use Java 'daily', how long,

    where,
    > >>and what types of projects. One of the guys I work with took a Java
    > >>

    > > 'course'
    > >
    > >>and the guy teaching the course knew very little about Java (from what I
    > >>could gather). It was a waste of his time and left a bad taste in his
    > >>

    > > mouth.
    > >
    > >> When you say "take it from home", do you mean at your own pace - no

    class
    > >>time? If so, I see no reason to take this course because as Volker

    said,
    > >>you can get help from newsgroups.
    > >>
    > >>Mark
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >




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