Starting out


DevX Home    Today's Headlines   Articles Archive   Tip Bank   Forums   

Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Starting out

  1. #1
    Will Guest

    Starting out


    I have been doing alot of self-study and taking on-line classes and would
    like to get started professionally. How do I convince an employer that I
    am ready and qualified? Can anyone share any startup stories or advice?

  2. #2
    Jerry Dennany Guest

    Re: Starting out


    Well, I got started at a helpdesk / customer service job - It wasn't
    programming, but it was an _excellent_ way to get my foot in the door, and
    get the 'hands-on' computer experience that employers are looking for. It
    didn't pay well, but it was my 'ticket' in to the industry. Once I was
    there, I was able to make a name for myself by automating tasks that
    traditionally took many man-hours for us to do by hand (I started writing
    Installshield setups... really easy stuff, but no-one else seemed eager to
    learn!)

    There were also a number of benifits of working support:
    - An enhanced understanding of PC/Desktop issues, as well as an opportunity
    to learn operating systems (something many programmers lack skill in)
    - Experience working with the end-user, and an understanding of what people
    are looking for in an end-user experience. This is insight that will be
    invaluable to you when you begin designing your own programs.


    Many companies are practically begging for quality helpdesk personel - often
    the entry criteria is more focused on a willingness to learn and being good
    with people - limited computer experience is not always a big deal. More
    important factors are good social / people skills.

    After 6 months to a year of this, it should be fairly easy to transition to
    another position within the same company - if not, you'll have real,
    honest-to-goodness IT experience under your belt, and could probably move
    onto another 'opportunity' fairly easily.

    Of course, some of this will depend on the market in your particular area...
    That's a simple fact of life...


    More questions? Email me..

    -jerdenn
    jerdenn@mindspring.com


    "Will" <willfug@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    news:3978a4c0$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > I have been doing alot of self-study and taking on-line classes and would
    > like to get started professionally. How do I convince an employer that I
    > am ready and qualified? Can anyone share any startup stories or advice?




  3. #3
    marle Guest

    Re: Starting out


    Here, Here!
    The toughest part of the IT career run is the proverbial foot in the door.
    The trick is to sneak in at a position at the low levels of the IT operating
    heirarchy. Help Desk, as Jerry pointed out, is great start, but certainly
    not the only track available out there. Consider also positions that will
    allow you to manipulate data. Often, employers look for individuals proficient
    in MS Access or MS Excel skills. Such skills involve data manipulation and
    are so eeaassyyy to learn.
    If you already mastered the basics with these applications, move on to automation.
    Automation is a wonderful way to impress those who tend to rely on data,
    which is any type of business by the way.

    That's the way I got started. Mess around with your applications. Do this
    by exploring all facets of the application. Go through all the selections
    on the menu bars, and see if there is some real-world method in which to
    apply them. This will seperate you from the average end-user, who will eventually
    rely on your knowledge of the UNKNOWN.

    That's what I did.

    Eventually, you will not be able to stop yourself from moving on to more
    powerful tools e.g., Visual Basic(if you haven't already). But don't stop
    there. Let that confidence build, throw ideas at your boss and your future
    collegues. Most people start low, so you may have to bare a salary at the
    mid 20's for about 8 to 12 months.

    If you love IT, you will presevere.
    I hope this helps.

    Here







    "Jerry Dennany" <jerdenn@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >
    >Well, I got started at a helpdesk / customer service job - It wasn't
    >programming, but it was an _excellent_ way to get my foot in the door, and
    >get the 'hands-on' computer experience that employers are looking for.

    It
    >didn't pay well, but it was my 'ticket' in to the industry. Once I was
    >there, I was able to make a name for myself by automating tasks that
    >traditionally took many man-hours for us to do by hand (I started writing
    >Installshield setups... really easy stuff, but no-one else seemed eager

    to
    >learn!)
    >
    >There were also a number of benifits of working support:
    > - An enhanced understanding of PC/Desktop issues, as well as an opportunity
    >to learn operating systems (something many programmers lack skill in)
    >- Experience working with the end-user, and an understanding of what people
    >are looking for in an end-user experience. This is insight that will be
    >invaluable to you when you begin designing your own programs.
    >
    >
    >Many companies are practically begging for quality helpdesk personel - often
    >the entry criteria is more focused on a willingness to learn and being good
    >with people - limited computer experience is not always a big deal. More
    >important factors are good social / people skills.
    >
    >After 6 months to a year of this, it should be fairly easy to transition

    to
    >another position within the same company - if not, you'll have real,
    >honest-to-goodness IT experience under your belt, and could probably move
    >onto another 'opportunity' fairly easily.
    >
    >Of course, some of this will depend on the market in your particular area...
    >That's a simple fact of life...
    >
    >
    >More questions? Email me..
    >
    >-jerdenn
    >jerdenn@mindspring.com
    >
    >
    >"Will" <willfug@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    >news:3978a4c0$1@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> I have been doing alot of self-study and taking on-line classes and would
    >> like to get started professionally. How do I convince an employer that

    I
    >> am ready and qualified? Can anyone share any startup stories or advice?

    >
    >



  4. #4
    Gregg D. Harrington Guest

    Re: Starting out


    I would have to agree... right now I am working for only 11 dollars an hour
    because I started doing data entry and then just moved up and now that I
    have some experience I getting alot of people talking to me about 80,000
    a year... and I am almost there

    "marle" <mesco@mail.com> wrote:
    >
    >Here, Here!
    >The toughest part of the IT career run is the proverbial foot in the door.
    >The trick is to sneak in at a position at the low levels of the IT operating
    >heirarchy. Help Desk, as Jerry pointed out, is great start, but certainly
    >not the only track available out there. Consider also positions that will
    >allow you to manipulate data. Often, employers look for individuals proficient
    >in MS Access or MS Excel skills. Such skills involve data manipulation and
    >are so eeaassyyy to learn.
    >If you already mastered the basics with these applications, move on to automation.
    >Automation is a wonderful way to impress those who tend to rely on data,
    >which is any type of business by the way.
    >
    >That's the way I got started. Mess around with your applications. Do this
    >by exploring all facets of the application. Go through all the selections
    >on the menu bars, and see if there is some real-world method in which to
    >apply them. This will seperate you from the average end-user, who will eventually
    >rely on your knowledge of the UNKNOWN.
    >
    >That's what I did.
    >
    >Eventually, you will not be able to stop yourself from moving on to more
    >powerful tools e.g., Visual Basic(if you haven't already). But don't stop
    >there. Let that confidence build, throw ideas at your boss and your future
    >collegues. Most people start low, so you may have to bare a salary at the
    >mid 20's for about 8 to 12 months.
    >
    >If you love IT, you will presevere.
    >I hope this helps.
    >
    >Here
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >"Jerry Dennany" <jerdenn@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>Well, I got started at a helpdesk / customer service job - It wasn't
    >>programming, but it was an _excellent_ way to get my foot in the door,

    and
    >>get the 'hands-on' computer experience that employers are looking for.


    >It
    >>didn't pay well, but it was my 'ticket' in to the industry. Once I was
    >>there, I was able to make a name for myself by automating tasks that
    >>traditionally took many man-hours for us to do by hand (I started writing
    >>Installshield setups... really easy stuff, but no-one else seemed eager

    >to
    >>learn!)
    >>
    >>There were also a number of benifits of working support:
    >> - An enhanced understanding of PC/Desktop issues, as well as an opportunity
    >>to learn operating systems (something many programmers lack skill in)
    >>- Experience working with the end-user, and an understanding of what people
    >>are looking for in an end-user experience. This is insight that will be
    >>invaluable to you when you begin designing your own programs.
    >>
    >>
    >>Many companies are practically begging for quality helpdesk personel -

    often
    >>the entry criteria is more focused on a willingness to learn and being

    good
    >>with people - limited computer experience is not always a big deal. More
    >>important factors are good social / people skills.
    >>
    >>After 6 months to a year of this, it should be fairly easy to transition

    >to
    >>another position within the same company - if not, you'll have real,
    >>honest-to-goodness IT experience under your belt, and could probably move
    >>onto another 'opportunity' fairly easily.
    >>
    >>Of course, some of this will depend on the market in your particular area...
    >>That's a simple fact of life...
    >>
    >>
    >>More questions? Email me..
    >>
    >>-jerdenn
    >>jerdenn@mindspring.com
    >>
    >>
    >>"Will" <willfug@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    >>news:3978a4c0$1@news.devx.com...
    >>>
    >>> I have been doing alot of self-study and taking on-line classes and would
    >>> like to get started professionally. How do I convince an employer that

    >I
    >>> am ready and qualified? Can anyone share any startup stories or advice?

    >>
    >>

    >



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
HTML5 Development Center
 
 
FAQ
Latest Articles
Java
.NET
XML
Database
Enterprise
Questions? Contact us.
C++
Web Development
Wireless
Latest Tips
Open Source


   Development Centers

   -- Android Development Center
   -- Cloud Development Project Center
   -- HTML5 Development Center
   -- Windows Mobile Development Center