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Thread: Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.

  1. #1
    Jacob Peter K Guest

    Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.


    Hello,
    I have been trying to install Linux (Redhat7.1) with Windows 2000. I have
    selected LILO to be installed in the boot partition and windows in the MBR.
    I am unable to find the boot.ini in Windows2000 to enter the path of bootsect.lnx.
    How do I have a dual boot in Windows 2000? is there some other file replacing
    boot.ini?

    Any help would be greatly appretiated.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jacob.


  2. #2
    Vrinda Guest

    Re: Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.


    Hi

    I think u have installed Windows 2000 before installing Linux. Linux automatically
    asks u whether u want linux or dos.

    I hope that solves your problem.

    Bye


    "Jacob Peter K" <jacob.peter@in.bosch.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hello,
    >I have been trying to install Linux (Redhat7.1) with Windows 2000. I have
    >selected LILO to be installed in the boot partition and windows in the MBR.
    >I am unable to find the boot.ini in Windows2000 to enter the path of bootsect.lnx.
    >How do I have a dual boot in Windows 2000? is there some other file replacing
    >boot.ini?
    >
    >Any help would be greatly appretiated.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.
    >
    >Jacob.
    >



  3. #3
    Guest

    Re: Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.



    Hi,

    Boot.ini and other system files in Windows 2000, are not only protected but
    hidden. You will need to select "show hidden and System files" in Windows
    2000. (Sorry I cannot tell where this is - options(?) i am working abroad
    at the moment, and not using Windows 2000. Once you have found the file,
    its in C:, unprotect it and add your comments regarding Linux (which you
    seem to know more about than I). Remember to reprotect it, and hide it again,
    it's the most important file in W2K. You can change the default boot in notepad,
    but why do it there? Its much easier to do it in control panel in Windows.

    I also think that if you use a NTFS system rather than FAT32, you will have
    problems, I cannot get Linux to boot from a file on NTFS. Use Partition
    Magic (or something else) to make a small partition before the NTFS one,
    rememmber to copy all tyhe files in C: onto a floppy, so you can then copy
    them onto your new partition. Otherwise you will have to reinstall W2K!

    Good luck

    "Jacob Peter K" <jacob.peter@in.bosch.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hello,
    >I have been trying to install Linux (Redhat7.1) with Windows 2000. I have
    >selected LILO to be installed in the boot partition and windows in the MBR.
    >I am unable to find the boot.ini in Windows2000 to enter the path of bootsect.lnx.
    >How do I have a dual boot in Windows 2000? is there some other file replacing
    >boot.ini?
    >
    >Any help would be greatly appretiated.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.
    >
    >Jacob.
    >



  4. #4
    Antony Briggs Guest

    Re: Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.


    Hi Jacob.

    Assuming your Win2k system is currently configured to boot straight off,
    and you get into your linux system with a floppy...

    Boot into linux - configure lilo to install to MBR and set your linux and
    dos(really Win2K) partitions up. In lilo.conf dos partitions are described
    as 'other'

    I would post my lilo.conf but i'm at work and i'm still trying to get my
    LRP firewall to work, sorry.

    All Windows systems share a very similar MBR code - all it does is look at
    which partition has the Active bit set and run the code in the superblock
    of that partition. Thus lilo can slip in there and do that job just fine
    no matter what version of windows is installed.

    If you really want to have win2k in the mbr then you have to dd off the first
    512 bytes of your linux partition in to a file called bootsect.dos and edit
    boot.ini. The problem with this is that youll have to update this if you
    install a new kernel (something that I seem to need to do more often that
    I care to think about)

    TTFN

    Antony

    "Jacob Peter K" <jacob.peter@in.bosch.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hello,
    >I have been trying to install Linux (Redhat7.1) with Windows 2000. I have
    >selected LILO to be installed in the boot partition and windows in the MBR.
    >I am unable to find the boot.ini in Windows2000 to enter the path of bootsect.lnx.
    >How do I have a dual boot in Windows 2000? is there some other file replacing
    >boot.ini?
    >
    >Any help would be greatly appretiated.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.
    >
    >Jacob.
    >



  5. #5
    I. Chou Guest

    Re: Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.


    I have just installed RedHat 7.1 onto a slave hard drive (Windows 2000 is
    the only OS on my master/boot drive). I selected LILO to install to the
    MBR, thinking it would allow me to choose between Win2K and Linux on boot
    (at least, the book I was reading suggested this!) I should have done my
    research before committing, and I even though it weird that it didn't show
    my NTFS partitions during LILO setup.

    Anyway, there is a URL for a page which discusses just this issue. Since
    Linux now boots automatically with no apparent knowledge of W2K, edit lilo.conf
    as the last poster suggests. Read more on the page: http://www.littlewhitedog.com/reviews_other_00011b.asp

    HTH, and good luck

    "Jacob Peter K" <jacob.peter@in.bosch.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hello,
    >I have been trying to install Linux (Redhat7.1) with Windows 2000. I have
    >selected LILO to be installed in the boot partition and windows in the MBR.
    >I am unable to find the boot.ini in Windows2000 to enter the path of bootsect.lnx.
    >How do I have a dual boot in Windows 2000? is there some other file replacing
    >boot.ini?
    >
    >Any help would be greatly appretiated.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.
    >
    >Jacob.




  6. #6
    linuxhost2001 Guest

    Re: Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.


    Hello, JPK..
    I had success in installing win2k (with NTFS!!) first on a 4 gig partition,
    and then Linux..... LILO should work fine. I hate carrying boot disks around....
    LOL

    Good luck!

    "Jacob Peter K" <jacob.peter@in.bosch.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hello,
    >I have been trying to install Linux (Redhat7.1) with Windows 2000. I have
    >selected LILO to be installed in the boot partition and windows in the MBR.
    >I am unable to find the boot.ini in Windows2000 to enter the path of bootsect.lnx.
    >How do I have a dual boot in Windows 2000? is there some other file replacing
    >boot.ini?
    >
    >Any help would be greatly appretiated.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.
    >
    >Jacob.
    >



  7. #7
    ogus Guest

    Re: Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.


    check http://www.uoguelph.ca/~jomstead/

    <shadowdude64@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >Hi,
    >
    >Boot.ini and other system files in Windows 2000, are not only protected

    but
    >hidden. You will need to select "show hidden and System files" in Windows
    >2000. (Sorry I cannot tell where this is - options(?) i am working abroad
    >at the moment, and not using Windows 2000. Once you have found the file,
    >its in C:, unprotect it and add your comments regarding Linux (which you
    >seem to know more about than I). Remember to reprotect it, and hide it again,
    >it's the most important file in W2K. You can change the default boot in

    notepad,
    >but why do it there? Its much easier to do it in control panel in Windows.
    >
    >I also think that if you use a NTFS system rather than FAT32, you will have
    >problems, I cannot get Linux to boot from a file on NTFS. Use Partition
    >Magic (or something else) to make a small partition before the NTFS one,
    >rememmber to copy all tyhe files in C: onto a floppy, so you can then copy
    >them onto your new partition. Otherwise you will have to reinstall W2K!


    >
    >Good luck
    >
    >"Jacob Peter K" <jacob.peter@in.bosch.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>Hello,
    >>I have been trying to install Linux (Redhat7.1) with Windows 2000. I have
    >>selected LILO to be installed in the boot partition and windows in the

    MBR.
    >>I am unable to find the boot.ini in Windows2000 to enter the path of bootsect.lnx.
    >>How do I have a dual boot in Windows 2000? is there some other file replacing
    >>boot.ini?
    >>
    >>Any help would be greatly appretiated.
    >>
    >>Thanks in advance.
    >>
    >>Jacob.
    >>

    >



  8. #8
    Umesh Kr. Pandey Guest

    Re: Dual boot of Linux with Windows 2000.


    "Jacob Peter K" <jacob.peter@in.bosch.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hello,
    >I have been trying to install Linux (Redhat7.1) with Windows 2000. I have
    >selected LILO to be installed in the boot partition and windows in the MBR.
    >I am unable to find the boot.ini in Windows2000 to enter the path of bootsect.lnx.
    >How do I have a dual boot in Windows 2000? is there some other file replacing
    >boot.ini?
    >
    >Any help would be greatly appretiated.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.



    I have got this detail via net if this help you out, it's my pleasure.


    pl. confirm me its works or not



    Umesh

    >Red Hat 7.1 / Win2k Dual Boot

    The following is a "cookbook" appoach to dual booting RedHat 7.1 and Windows
    2000 and was written while installing on my Compaq 1800T laptop. Hopefully
    I have documented the process well enough that you won't have questions;
    however, if you do have questions, try reading through the installation manual
    on the Red Hat site before you begin.

    This installation assumes that you have a 20 gig hard drive with Win2k already
    installed. If you are starting with a clean hard drive, set a 50 megabyte
    partition at the beginning of the drive to hold the Linux /boot partition.
    This should be left unformatted or set to Ext2fs. The reason for the small
    partition is to hold the Linux kernel image, which needs to be installed
    before the 1024th cylinder of the hard disk. After setting the 50 meg partition,
    set a partition for Win2k ( I chose about 11 gigs). The remainder of the
    drive does not need to be partitioned or formatted at this point. Now, intall
    Win2k and then proceed to step 3.

    If you are starting with Win2k already installed, start with step 1.

    1. Resize partition with Partition Magic - I went from 20 gigs on the C:
    partition to just under 11 gigs.

    2. Using Partition Magic, move the C: partition so that there's 50 megs of
    unformatted space before the C: partition

    3. Reboot box and set the BIOS to boot from CD (If necessary).

    4. Reboot with Red Hat ISO image - disk 1 in CD drive.

    5. Press Enter to install RedHat in graphical mode (image will load).

    6. Language

    Choose language (English).

    Click Next.

    7. Keyboard Configuration

    Choose Model, layout, dead keys (generic 105-key, U.S. English, Enable dead
    keys).

    Click Next.

    8. Mouse Configuration

    Choose mouse. (3-button (PS/2) Select Emulate 3 Buttons.

    Click Next.

    9. At the Welcome screen.

    Click Next.

    10. Installation Type

    Choose Custom System for install type.

    Click Next.

    11. Disk Partitioning

    For Partitioning, choose Manual with Disk Druid.

    Click Next.

    12. Disk Druid Partitions - Click HERE for a screenshot.

    You'll see:
    Mount Point Device Requested Actual Type
    <not set> hda1 10992 10992 Win95 FAT32


    LEAVE THIS PARTITION ALONE

    NOTE: The type may be NTFS - it doen't matter, just leave it be. This is
    the Windows partition.

    NOTE: If you pre-formatted or set aside a 50 meg partition, you will see
    it listed. Highlight it and click Edit and designate it as /boot.

    13. Click Add and make it look similar to the following: [help]
    Mount Point Device Requested Actual Type
    <not set> hda1 10992 10992 Win95 FAT32
    /boot hda2 50M 51M Linux Native
    / hda5 4000M 4001M Linux Native
    <Swap> hda6 320M 324M Linux Swap
    /home hda7 1M 3706M Linux Native


    NOTE: Set the /home partition to Use Remaining Space.

    NOTE: I'm running 320 MB RAM and equalling it in the swap file.

    The Drive Summary should equal 100% of the drive.

    Click Next.

    HINT: Putting /home on a separate partition is optional, but it is a good
    way to save information on a partition separate from the main 3 linux partitions
    (/boot, /, and swap). Should you ever need to re-install Red Hat due to
    problems, you can choose not to re-format the /home partition and keep all
    the information saved there, while getting a fresh installation of Red Hat
    to work with. If this is the case, you must know the designation of the
    /home partition so that you don't over-write it on the new installation.
    In the example above it is hda7. If you need to recheck this, type df in
    a terminal window.

    I have broken quite a few programs and libraries while learning what I can
    and cannot do while working in the Linux O/S. It is often easier for the
    novice to do a re-install of the O/S rather than to try to repair the many
    files that may be changed during a program installation. In most cases,
    even if Linux won't boot from the hard drive, you can boot it from the floppy
    you'll make as a part of this installation.

    You can then move copies of the files you want to save into the /home directory.
    I usually move in the /etc directory. (This directory contains most of
    the configuration files - think of it as similar to the registry in Windows.)
    I also move in the /usr directory. This is where many of the programs reside.
    Since I have worked hard on setting up my firewall configuration and don't
    want to loose it, getting a copy of it from /usr/sbin is important. I also
    have many custom configured programs that run from /usr/local/bin.

    After a re-installation of Red Hat, I can refer to my config files in /home/backup/etc
    to reconfigure my programs and move back in scripts and programs that were
    kept in the /usr directory. This can keep the time involved in re-configuring
    you box to a minimum.

    14. Choose to format the partitions /, /boot, and /home. You may enable
    check for bad blocks if you wish.

    Click Next.

    15. Lilo Configuration Click HERE for screenshot.

    The following boxes should be checked.

    Create Boot Disk
    Install LILO
    Install LILO boot record on:
    /dev/hda Master Boot Record (MBR).
    Use Linear Mode
    Kernel parameters "hdc=ide-scsi

    Default boot image should be UNCHECKED
    boot label should be dos
    There should be a check in /dev/hda5 Linux Native linux

    Click Next.

    16. Network Configuration

    I use a static IP for my box, so I use the following for my Network Configuration:


    Uncheck Configure using DHCP - this allows you to enter the IP Address information.


    NOTE: This assumes that the computer is on a network and is not the server.
    If this is not the case, research this before starting the installation.


    Configure using DHCP (No)
    Active on boot (Yes)
    IP Address 192.168.1.6
    Netmask 255.255.255.0 (if you hit "Tab" after filling this in, it will
    fill out the next two lines for you.)
    Network 192.168.1.0
    Broadcast 192.168.1.255

    Hostname petey.benchtest.com (my cat, if you must know)
    Gateway 192.168.1.1 (my server)
    Primary DNS 192.168.1.1
    Secondary DNS 207.xxx.xxx.xxx (My ISP's Primary DNS)
    Ternary DNS 207.xxx.xxx.xxx (My ISP's Secondary DNS)

    Click Next.

    17. Firewall Configuration

    NOTE: I set up a cursory firewall on installation, then install my own firewall
    after the box is up. Install something NOW. You do not want to have the
    box on the internet without SOME KIND of firewall, even if it is just for
    a few minutes while you setup your internet connection. PERIOD! This will
    get you going without opening up too much.

    Choose your security level - medium

    Customize

    Trusted devices: eth0

    Allow incoming:
    SSH
    Mail (SMTP)

    Click Next.

    18. Language Selection

    Choose the default language - English

    Click Next.

    19.Time Zone Selection

    Location = America/New York. (The info on the UTC tab will be set automatically
    - NY is UTC-05 US Eastern)

    Select Daylight Saving Time (if applicable)

    Click Next.

    20. Account Configuration

    Root Password (make it good!) Twice.

    21. Same screen: Add an account.

    Mine looks like this:

    Account name: petey

    Password: some_password Password (confirm): some_password

    Full Name: petey

    Click Add,

    add another account if you wish, then

    Click Next.

    22. Authentication Configuration

    Check - Enable MD5 passwords

    Check - Enable Shadow passwords

    Leave the next 3 boxes disabled unless you know you need them. You can set
    them up as you need them from within Red Hat.

    NIS
    LDAP
    Kerberos

    Click Next.

    23. Package Group Selection -- Scroll to bottom and select Everything (total
    install size 2,288M).

    Selecting everthing gives you an extensive selection of software. Much more
    than the average user will need; however, until you know what you will and
    won't use, it is a great way to start learning what's available.

    Click Next.

    24. X Configuration

    ATI Rage Mobility

    RAM 16 MB

    Click Next.

    HINT: If your hardware is fairly recent, it will be detected. It is pretty
    safe to go with whatever is listed on the screen. If the X, Monitor and/or
    Graphics configuration aren't set correctly, you will probably end up with
    Red Hat giving errors and running in text mode after you boot up. I usually
    go with what is listed as the default configuration and tweak it later.
    In the case of this laptop, no tweaking was necessary. The default settings
    were perfect.

    25. Monitor Configuration

    Choose your configuration - if what is displayed, is close, go with it.
    You can change this later by running Xconfigurator, but for now we just need
    it to boot up to a GUI screen.

    My settings are:

    Laptop Screen

    H Sync 30-110 kHz

    V Sync 60-110 Hz

    Click Next.

    26. Customize Graphics

    Color = High Color (16 bit)

    Resolution = 1024x768

    Press the test setting button and choose Yes if you see the message.

    Choose Gnome for desktop environment and

    Graphical for login type.

    Click Next.

    27. About to Install -- Click Next.

    28. Installing Packages - The installation process copies the files to the
    hard drive.

    29. Boot Disk Creation - Insert a formatted floppy and click Next.

    30. Congratulations, installation is complete. Click Exit.

    If all went well, you should get a Red Hat boot screen with the choice of
    linux and dos.

    There are some additional setup hints in the Compaq 1800T article.

    If you want to run the Win2k (NT4) boot loader, take a look at NT / Linux
    dual boot article.



    >



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1
    Hey, this is really a lot easier than everyone is making it out to be. First of all, let me show you the lilo.conf from my Red Hat 9 install:


    --------------------- snip -----------------------


    prompt
    timeout=50
    default=linux
    boot=/dev/hda
    map=/boot/map
    install=/boot/boot.b
    message=/boot/message
    lba32

    image=/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.20-8
    label=linux
    initrd=/boot/initrd-2.4.20-8.img
    read-only
    append="hdd=ide-scsi root=LABEL=/"

    other=/dev/hda1
    optional
    label=WINDOWS


    --------------------- snip -----------------------


    Now, if you'll notice the last three lines, they simply mean the following:

    other=/dev/hda1

    other tells lilo to look for an operating system other than linux or minix or bsd, etc. In other words, WINDOWS

    /dev/hda1 This is the location of the 'other' operating system. hda means look for the first drive on the IDE controller. The second drive would be hdb, the third hdc, etc. If you have a SCSI hard drive, then you instead need to use sdx instead, replacing the 'x' with 'a', 'b', etc just as above.

    Ok, the 1 following the hda above tells lilo to load the first partition of the first IDE hard drive, and boot it.



    Ok, that said, if I understood you correctly, what you were trying to say is you had LILO installed in the boot partition, and Windows (effectively) is installed in the first partition. If that is so, then the lilo.conf file (which is located in /etc in your linux install) should work just fine for you.

    TWEAKING

    The line which reads lba32 tells lilo to use 32-bit large block addressing. You probably want this, unless your system has a really small/old hard drive. Considering you're using Win2k, I doubt your hard drive is too old to need this.

    timeout=50 tells lilo to wait 50 seconds before booting the default OS. Feel free to set this to however many seconds you want.

    default=linux This tells lilo to automatically boot the OS which has the label linux when the user simply presses enter at the boot loader menu, or after the timeout period has elapsed. If you would prefer your windows install to boot first, with the above lilo.conf, you would change this to:

    default=WINDOWS

    Capitalization IS important.


    After you have edited your lilo.conf, make SURE to run

    lilo

    as the root user. This will make the changes take effect. If you neglect to do this, the lilo.conf file will still remain as you have set it, but the lilo configuration upon boot will still be as it was before. In this case, just log in to your linux installation, su to root, and run lilo.

    Ok, that should be all you need to know. I don't think I've forgotten anything.

    The only other advice I can give you is to go to a web site where there are a lot more knowledgable linux users when you need info on how to do something. The best one to get started with is http://www.justlinux.com

    Otherwise, if you reply to this message that you're still having problems, I'll do my best to help you. I've been using linux for four years now, and as of about 2 months ago, I no longer have windows on my computer. I use linux exclusively. But I still remember how to make the two interoperate. Oh, one last thing. I would highly recommend using a more recent distro of linux if at all possible. RedHat 9 at the very least. Or Fedora Core 1 or 2. But going with the latest Mandrake or SUSE would be even better. RedHat distros do not have any software included for working with mp3's, ntfs, or anything else which the company is afraid might get them sued over licencing issues. The reason I recommend a more recent distro from anyone, though, is open source software has come a LONG LONG way since redhat 7.1. I remember when I used it, and I'd rather not go back to it. I'm using a modified Slackware 9.1 right now, and my GUI and applications all look a lot more slick than anything under windows xp, aside from the fact that I never have to wait for any program to do anything and that they never crash.

    Anyway, best of luck. I hope all this helps.

    solid_liq


    geek1 > "I hear that if you play the Windows XP Install CD backwards, it plays satanic messages!"
    geek2 > "That's nothing, if you play it forwards, it INSTALLS WINDOWS XP!!"

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