Swing is dead, long live SWT


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Thread: Swing is dead, long live SWT

  1. #1
    Darren Bell Guest

    Swing is dead, long live SWT


    "JB" <jbeth@aimworld.com> wrote:
    >
    >Believe me: nothing could be further from the truth than this statement

    in
    >the Swing article:
    >
    >"I find it hard to believe that Swing cannot exceed performance requirements
    >for the vast majority of applications. In my experience, Swing performance
    >is more than adequate—it is the supporting code and architecture that is
    >lacking." Best start "believing" Bradley, unless you're thinking there's
    >a huge market out there for a "Hello World" app.
    >
    >Swing delivers such HUGE files to the client for any application of minimal
    >sophistication and complexity, that it renders it virtually unusable. We
    >know. We based an entire application suite on it and dropped it like a

    hot
    >potato when the "hardware advances" didn't make a dent in the pitiful performance.
    > We are absolutely cooking with our replacement COM/ASP architecture.
    >
    >Stay away from Swing.......you'll be doing yourself a big big favor.
    >
    >

    I absolutely agree with what you say. We started off by using Swing for
    our in-house development. The users hated it. It performed slowly and has
    lots of bugs. Try using a hava app on dual monitors for instance.

    Then we found Eclipse. This is a software development tool completely written
    in Java. It's not just for java though as there a loads of tools for it.
    The really cool thing with this is that it uses something called SWT.

    The Standard Widget Toolkit was written by IBM when they hit a brick wall
    with Swing. It is a pure java interface that uses the native operating system
    to draw components.

    All i can say is.... wow! We now have java apps that look and behave like
    win32 C++ apps. The users cannot tell the difference. But the real benefit
    is that if you run on Linux, the operating system calls will use Motif/GTK.
    Your unchanged java app now looks like a real Linux program. The same also
    goes for Solaris, AIX, MacOs, Pocket PC etc.

    As far as we are concerned, this is the future for all our development.

    Check it out, you will not be dissapointed.

    Darren.

  2. #2
    Rob Abbe Guest

    Re: Swing is dead, long live SWT


    SWT is great, a native look and feel along with the use of ActiveX cotnrols
    on the Windows platform. It can provide a nice migration option from the
    world of VB6. I however still prefer SWING more or less for personal reasons.
    Since SWING apps can take advantage of the video hardware on JRE 1.4 and
    above, most of my performance complaints are behind me.

    I have to say I love all of the options that are available from the Java
    world. It's a very refreshing change from the oppressed world of Microsoft
    development where only Microsoft is allowed to innovate. Java is all about
    empowering the IT industry!

    Rob Abbe

    "Darren Bell" <djb@dolby.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >"JB" <jbeth@aimworld.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>Believe me: nothing could be further from the truth than this statement

    >in
    >>the Swing article:
    >>
    >>"I find it hard to believe that Swing cannot exceed performance requirements
    >>for the vast majority of applications. In my experience, Swing performance
    >>is more than adequate—it is the supporting code and architecture that is
    >>lacking." Best start "believing" Bradley, unless you're thinking there's
    >>a huge market out there for a "Hello World" app.
    >>
    >>Swing delivers such HUGE files to the client for any application of minimal
    >>sophistication and complexity, that it renders it virtually unusable.

    We
    >>know. We based an entire application suite on it and dropped it like a

    >hot
    >>potato when the "hardware advances" didn't make a dent in the pitiful performance.
    >> We are absolutely cooking with our replacement COM/ASP architecture.
    >>
    >>Stay away from Swing.......you'll be doing yourself a big big favor.
    >>
    >>

    >I absolutely agree with what you say. We started off by using Swing for
    >our in-house development. The users hated it. It performed slowly and

    has
    >lots of bugs. Try using a hava app on dual monitors for instance.
    >
    >Then we found Eclipse. This is a software development tool completely written
    >in Java. It's not just for java though as there a loads of tools for it.
    > The really cool thing with this is that it uses something called SWT.
    >
    >The Standard Widget Toolkit was written by IBM when they hit a brick wall
    >with Swing. It is a pure java interface that uses the native operating

    system
    >to draw components.
    >
    >All i can say is.... wow! We now have java apps that look and behave like
    >win32 C++ apps. The users cannot tell the difference. But the real benefit
    >is that if you run on Linux, the operating system calls will use Motif/GTK.
    > Your unchanged java app now looks like a real Linux program. The same

    also
    >goes for Solaris, AIX, MacOs, Pocket PC etc.
    >
    >As far as we are concerned, this is the future for all our development.
    >
    >Check it out, you will not be dissapointed.
    >
    >Darren.



  3. #3
    MarkN Guest

    Re: Swing is dead, long live SWT


    <Q>
    All i can say is.... wow! We now have java apps that look and behave like
    win32 C++ apps.
    </Q>
    Excellent. Apps that crash and have buffer overruns!



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