XML, the AHA hasn't come to me yet


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Thread: XML, the AHA hasn't come to me yet

  1. #1
    Willy Van den Driessche Guest

    XML, the AHA hasn't come to me yet

    This may sound like a stupid question but can somebody tell me what makes
    XML so great ? To me it's a hierarchical data format. OK, it's a standard
    and that opens some doors but I am clearly still missing something.

    Why would I store data in an XML file when I already have access to splendid
    blazingly fast relational databases ?
    Why would I use XML since it only allows me to store a tree, not an
    arbitrary structure ?
    Why would I use an XML soap envelope when it doesn't protect me from a
    server method being no longer available ?
    Why would I send XML over a wire ? It's a text format, right ? Doesn't it
    waste enormous bandwidth ?

    These questions are just rhetorical and not meant to be answered as such.
    But it is very clear I'm missing something.

    Could somebody fill me in ?
    --
    Van den Driessche Willy
    For a work in progress :
    http://users.skynet.be/wvdd2/index.html



  2. #2
    MarkN Guest

    Re: XML, the AHA hasn't come to me yet


    You've hit on some key points. I think XML is very misused. It is not a
    silver bullet, just another tool. The best use for it is transfering data
    between different systems(This can be with SOAP over HTTP, but doesn't have
    to be). Most questions in this discussion group seem to stem from the misuse
    of XML.

    >Why would I store data in an XML file when I already have access to >splendid
    >blazingly fast relational databases ?

    XML can be useful in the place of standard .ini/.properties files for limited
    persistance with the use of a RDBMS. I haven't come across a use for an
    XML database yet. I have for an Object Database, though. This is why I
    separate persistance and business logic. I may want to get xml and objects
    from the same "data".

    >Why would I use XML since it only allows me to store a tree, not an
    >arbitrary structure ?

    Then don't use it if it is not right for the job. Most things seem to have
    some structure to them.

    >Why would I use an XML soap envelope when it doesn't protect me from a
    >server method being no longer available ?

    True. It is useful to a point but then falls down and another means should
    be used. Sometimes you can be too disconnected. I think MS is pushing this
    too much in .Net and ignoring other important issues in a distributed/enterprise
    environment. How well can SOAP over HTTP work in a transactional environment?
    SOAP(XML) over a messaging system (i.e MQ Series) would be much better.

    >Why would I send XML over a wire ? It's a text format, right ? Doesn't it
    >waste enormous bandwidth ?

    True. It must be used wisely. I venture to say that (dis)connected recordsets
    waste more.

    >These questions are just rhetorical and not meant to be answered as such.
    >But it is very clear I'm missing something.

    Thanks for saying them. I thought I was pretty much alone feeling this way
    in this newsgroup.

    Mark

  3. #3
    Willy Van den Driessche Guest

    Re: XML, the AHA hasn't come to me yet

    Mark, thanks for the reply,
    I too was thinking I was alone.
    --
    Van den Driessche Willy
    For a work in progress :
    http://users.skynet.be/wvdd2/index.html
    "MarkN" <mnuttall@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:3c022594$1@147.208.176.211...
    >
    > You've hit on some key points. I think XML is very misused. It is not a
    > silver bullet, just another tool. The best use for it is transfering data
    > between different systems(This can be with SOAP over HTTP, but doesn't

    have
    > to be). Most questions in this discussion group seem to stem from the

    misuse
    > of XML.
    >
    > >Why would I store data in an XML file when I already have access to

    >splendid
    > >blazingly fast relational databases ?

    > XML can be useful in the place of standard .ini/.properties files for

    limited
    > persistance with the use of a RDBMS. I haven't come across a use for an
    > XML database yet. I have for an Object Database, though. This is why I
    > separate persistance and business logic. I may want to get xml and

    objects
    > from the same "data".
    >
    > >Why would I use XML since it only allows me to store a tree, not an
    > >arbitrary structure ?

    > Then don't use it if it is not right for the job. Most things seem to

    have
    > some structure to them.
    >
    > >Why would I use an XML soap envelope when it doesn't protect me from a
    > >server method being no longer available ?

    > True. It is useful to a point but then falls down and another means

    should
    > be used. Sometimes you can be too disconnected. I think MS is pushing

    this
    > too much in .Net and ignoring other important issues in a

    distributed/enterprise
    > environment. How well can SOAP over HTTP work in a transactional

    environment?
    > SOAP(XML) over a messaging system (i.e MQ Series) would be much better.
    >
    > >Why would I send XML over a wire ? It's a text format, right ? Doesn't it
    > >waste enormous bandwidth ?

    > True. It must be used wisely. I venture to say that (dis)connected

    recordsets
    > waste more.
    >
    > >These questions are just rhetorical and not meant to be answered as such.
    > >But it is very clear I'm missing something.

    > Thanks for saying them. I thought I was pretty much alone feeling this

    way
    > in this newsgroup.
    >
    > Mark




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