How to analyze corrupted Access databases


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  1. #1
    Raffaele Guest

    How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access 97 databases,
    all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors to
    my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's CompactDatabase
    method.

    I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if a database
    "is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection object
    fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the databases
    and, if necessary, it repairs them.

    Many thanks

    R. Bafunno

  2. #2
    marc Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this problem.
    Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night. This
    will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1 this
    past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a week).

    Marc

    "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    >
    >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access 97 databases,
    >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors to
    >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's CompactDatabase
    >method.
    >
    >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if a database
    >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection object
    >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the databases
    >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    >
    >Many thanks
    >
    >R. Bafunno



  3. #3
    Douglas J. Steele Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases

    NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to. You
    actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    unnecessarily.

    See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for more
    details.

    HTH

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele/


    "marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    >
    > I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this

    problem.
    > Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.

    This
    > will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1 this
    > past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a week).
    >
    > Marc
    >
    > "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access 97

    databases,
    > >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    > >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors to
    > >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's

    CompactDatabase
    > >method.
    > >
    > >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if a

    database
    > >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection

    object
    > >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the

    databases
    > >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    > >
    > >Many thanks
    > >
    > >R. Bafunno

    >




  4. #4
    Raffaele Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    Thank you for your advice, but since I use JRO's CompactDatabase, I think
    there is no means to simply compact a database without implicitly repairing.
    Maybe it means that invoking JRO's CompactDatabase unless the database is
    really corrupted doesn't repair it also (and then that JRO's CompactDatabase
    isn't really affected by the risk of corrupting a database, as does Access'
    Repair tool instead)?
    Or even that I should use DAO's old-fashioned CompactDatabase method?

    RB

    "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to. You
    >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    >unnecessarily.
    >
    >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for more
    >details.
    >
    >HTH
    >
    >--
    >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >
    >
    >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this

    >problem.
    >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.

    >This
    >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1 this
    >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a week).
    >>
    >> Marc
    >>
    >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access 97

    >databases,
    >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors

    to
    >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's

    >CompactDatabase
    >> >method.
    >> >
    >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if a

    >database
    >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection

    >object
    >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the

    >databases
    >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    >> >
    >> >Many thanks
    >> >
    >> >R. Bafunno

    >>

    >
    >



  5. #5
    Richard Watt Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    Douglas

    This kb articles refers to Access 97. Presumably the same does not apply
    to Access 2000 since there is the 'compact on close' option, which does both
    a compact and repair?

    Cheers
    Richard


    "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to. You
    >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    >unnecessarily.
    >
    >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for more
    >details.
    >
    >HTH
    >
    >--
    >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >
    >
    >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this

    >problem.
    >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.

    >This
    >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1 this
    >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a week).
    >>
    >> Marc
    >>
    >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access 97

    >databases,
    >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors

    to
    >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's

    >CompactDatabase
    >> >method.
    >> >
    >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if a

    >database
    >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection

    >object
    >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the

    >databases
    >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    >> >
    >> >Many thanks
    >> >
    >> >R. Bafunno

    >>

    >
    >



  6. #6
    Douglas J. Steele Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases

    I don't use Access 2000, but there is a link to an Access 2000 specific
    article at the top of the article for which I posted the link.

    Does Access 2000 have a separate Repair option, or is there strictly the
    Compact and Repair option? I thought I'd heard something about the Repair
    option being removed, because of the problems it caused. (FWIW, I believe
    that Compact in Access 97 does do some repairs as part of its operation)

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele/


    "Richard Watt" <rich_watt@no__spam.hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3b325681$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > Douglas
    >
    > This kb articles refers to Access 97. Presumably the same does not apply
    > to Access 2000 since there is the 'compact on close' option, which does

    both
    > a compact and repair?
    >
    > Cheers
    > Richard
    >
    >
    > "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    > >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to.

    You
    > >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    > >unnecessarily.
    > >
    > >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for

    more
    > >details.
    > >
    > >HTH
    > >
    > >--
    > >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    > >
    > >
    > >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message

    news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    > >>
    > >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this

    > >problem.
    > >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.

    > >This
    > >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1

    this
    > >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a

    week).
    > >>
    > >> Marc
    > >>
    > >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access 97

    > >databases,
    > >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    > >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors

    > to
    > >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's

    > >CompactDatabase
    > >> >method.
    > >> >
    > >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if a

    > >database
    > >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection

    > >object
    > >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the

    > >databases
    > >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    > >> >
    > >> >Many thanks
    > >> >
    > >> >R. Bafunno
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >




  7. #7
    marc Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    I have lost more data not repairing a database than repairing a database (none).
    Multiple times the database was corrupted beyond repair and the data had
    to be restored from backup. If you find having people re-enter a days worth
    of work acceptable, than I would not repair a database. I do not find this
    acceptable. Additionally the repair is done a night, after a full backup
    is completed, if the database is lost a complete backup is available. Your
    faith in Access's repair capabilities leads me to believe you have not dealt
    with large Access databases.

    Marc

    "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to. You
    >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    >unnecessarily.
    >
    >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for more
    >details.
    >
    >HTH
    >
    >--
    >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >
    >
    >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this

    >problem.
    >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.

    >This
    >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1 this
    >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a week).
    >>
    >> Marc
    >>
    >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access 97

    >databases,
    >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors

    to
    >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's

    >CompactDatabase
    >> >method.
    >> >
    >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if a

    >database
    >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection

    >object
    >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the

    >databases
    >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    >> >
    >> >Many thanks
    >> >
    >> >R. Bafunno

    >>

    >
    >



  8. #8
    Douglas J. Steele Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases

    Feel free to continue your practice.

    Good luck. You'll probably need it.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele/


    "marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message
    news:3b336171$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > I have lost more data not repairing a database than repairing a database

    (none).
    > Multiple times the database was corrupted beyond repair and the data had
    > to be restored from backup. If you find having people re-enter a days

    worth
    > of work acceptable, than I would not repair a database. I do not find

    this
    > acceptable. Additionally the repair is done a night, after a full backup
    > is completed, if the database is lost a complete backup is available.

    Your
    > faith in Access's repair capabilities leads me to believe you have not

    dealt
    > with large Access databases.
    >
    > Marc
    >
    > "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    > >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to.

    You
    > >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    > >unnecessarily.
    > >
    > >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for

    more
    > >details.
    > >
    > >HTH
    > >
    > >--
    > >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    > >
    > >
    > >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message

    news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    > >>
    > >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this

    > >problem.
    > >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.

    > >This
    > >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1

    this
    > >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a

    week).
    > >>
    > >> Marc
    > >>
    > >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access 97

    > >databases,
    > >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    > >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors

    > to
    > >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's

    > >CompactDatabase
    > >> >method.
    > >> >
    > >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if a

    > >database
    > >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection

    > >object
    > >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the

    > >databases
    > >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    > >> >
    > >> >Many thanks
    > >> >
    > >> >R. Bafunno
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >




  9. #9
    Kevin MacCallum Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    Have you tries the JetComp.exe utility?
    It works on Access 97 / 2000 databases.

    Here is a URL to one of the KB articles
    http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q295/3/34.asp
    The download has an executable plus a Word file outling what it does.

    I've been able to use it to repair a database that Access couldn't.

    Kevin M.

    "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >Feel free to continue your practice.
    >
    >Good luck. You'll probably need it.
    >
    >--
    >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >
    >
    >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message
    >news:3b336171$1@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> I have lost more data not repairing a database than repairing a database

    >(none).
    >> Multiple times the database was corrupted beyond repair and the data

    had
    >> to be restored from backup. If you find having people re-enter a days

    >worth
    >> of work acceptable, than I would not repair a database. I do not find

    >this
    >> acceptable. Additionally the repair is done a night, after a full backup
    >> is completed, if the database is lost a complete backup is available.

    >Your
    >> faith in Access's repair capabilities leads me to believe you have not

    >dealt
    >> with large Access databases.
    >>
    >> Marc
    >>
    >> "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >> >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to.

    >You
    >> >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    >> >unnecessarily.
    >> >
    >> >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for

    >more
    >> >details.
    >> >
    >> >HTH
    >> >
    >> >--
    >> >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >> >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message

    >news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    >> >>
    >> >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this
    >> >problem.
    >> >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.
    >> >This
    >> >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1

    >this
    >> >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a

    >week).
    >> >>
    >> >> Marc
    >> >>
    >> >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access

    97
    >> >databases,
    >> >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    >> >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors

    >> to
    >> >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's
    >> >CompactDatabase
    >> >> >method.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if

    a
    >> >database
    >> >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection
    >> >object
    >> >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the
    >> >databases
    >> >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Many thanks
    >> >> >
    >> >> >R. Bafunno
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>

    >
    >



  10. #10
    Douglas J. Steele Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases

    Yup, JetComp is good (it's mentioned in the KB article I cited: item 10)

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele/


    "Kevin MacCallum" <kdmaccal@_nospamgapac.com> wrote in message
    news:3b3408c9$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > Have you tries the JetComp.exe utility?
    > It works on Access 97 / 2000 databases.
    >
    > Here is a URL to one of the KB articles
    > http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q295/3/34.asp
    > The download has an executable plus a Word file outling what it does.
    >
    > I've been able to use it to repair a database that Access couldn't.
    >
    > Kevin M.
    >
    > "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    > >Feel free to continue your practice.
    > >
    > >Good luck. You'll probably need it.
    > >
    > >--
    > >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    > >
    > >
    > >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message
    > >news:3b336171$1@news.devx.com...
    > >>
    > >> I have lost more data not repairing a database than repairing a

    database
    > >(none).
    > >> Multiple times the database was corrupted beyond repair and the data

    > had
    > >> to be restored from backup. If you find having people re-enter a days

    > >worth
    > >> of work acceptable, than I would not repair a database. I do not find

    > >this
    > >> acceptable. Additionally the repair is done a night, after a full

    backup
    > >> is completed, if the database is lost a complete backup is available.

    > >Your
    > >> faith in Access's repair capabilities leads me to believe you have not

    > >dealt
    > >> with large Access databases.
    > >>
    > >> Marc
    > >>
    > >> "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    > >> >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to.

    > >You
    > >> >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    > >> >unnecessarily.
    > >> >
    > >> >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for

    > >more
    > >> >details.
    > >> >
    > >> >HTH
    > >> >
    > >> >--
    > >> >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > >> >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message

    > >news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this
    > >> >problem.
    > >> >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at

    night.
    > >> >This
    > >> >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1

    > >this
    > >> >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a

    > >week).
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Marc
    > >> >>
    > >> >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access

    > 97
    > >> >databases,
    > >> >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    > >> >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open

    errors
    > >> to
    > >> >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's
    > >> >CompactDatabase
    > >> >> >method.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if

    > a
    > >> >database
    > >> >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection
    > >> >object
    > >> >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the
    > >> >databases
    > >> >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >Many thanks
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >R. Bafunno
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >




  11. #11
    marc Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    A quote from Access 97 help:

    "When you attempt to open or compact a corrupted database, a run-time error
    usually occurs. In some situations, however, a corrupted database may not
    be detected, and no error occurs. It's a good idea to provide your users
    with a way to use the RepairDatabase method in your application if their
    database behaves unpredictably."

    Microsft even goes so far in this help file to allow end users to perfrom
    db admin functions. It seems they have changed their mind about the use
    of the repair function. Undoubtly microsoft found a bug which made them
    changed their recomendation. I will still continue my practice becuase I
    have found it prevents the database from becoming corrupted, and therefore
    data loss.

    I will also wish you good luck with your projects, I know you will need it.

    Marc



    "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >Feel free to continue your practice.
    >
    >Good luck. You'll probably need it.
    >
    >--
    >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >
    >
    >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message
    >news:3b336171$1@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> I have lost more data not repairing a database than repairing a database

    >(none).
    >> Multiple times the database was corrupted beyond repair and the data

    had
    >> to be restored from backup. If you find having people re-enter a days

    >worth
    >> of work acceptable, than I would not repair a database. I do not find

    >this
    >> acceptable. Additionally the repair is done a night, after a full backup
    >> is completed, if the database is lost a complete backup is available.

    >Your
    >> faith in Access's repair capabilities leads me to believe you have not

    >dealt
    >> with large Access databases.
    >>
    >> Marc
    >>
    >> "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >> >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to.

    >You
    >> >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    >> >unnecessarily.
    >> >
    >> >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for

    >more
    >> >details.
    >> >
    >> >HTH
    >> >
    >> >--
    >> >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >> >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message

    >news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    >> >>
    >> >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this
    >> >problem.
    >> >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.
    >> >This
    >> >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1

    >this
    >> >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a

    >week).
    >> >>
    >> >> Marc
    >> >>
    >> >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access

    97
    >> >databases,
    >> >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    >> >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors

    >> to
    >> >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's
    >> >CompactDatabase
    >> >> >method.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if

    a
    >> >database
    >> >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection
    >> >object
    >> >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the
    >> >databases
    >> >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Many thanks
    >> >> >
    >> >> >R. Bafunno
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>

    >
    >



  12. #12
    Bob Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    Hi,

    I was planning to post a question regarding compacting Access 97 databases

    that reside on Novell servers. I had a small db, approx 3000 records on
    a server at work that I had run the compact/repair routine.

    It worked once, but not twice. The IT department warned me after the
    investigation, they stated that any Microsoft file residing on a Novell
    server should never be compacted or repaired with Microsoft software,
    specificly an Access Database.

    After reading the preceding, is there any valitity to corrupting an Access
    db on a Novell server via Microsoft's software. Are they incompatable?

    Bob

    "marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote:
    >
    >A quote from Access 97 help:
    >
    >"When you attempt to open or compact a corrupted database, a run-time error
    >usually occurs. In some situations, however, a corrupted database may not
    >be detected, and no error occurs. It's a good idea to provide your users
    >with a way to use the RepairDatabase method in your application if their
    >database behaves unpredictably."
    >
    >Microsft even goes so far in this help file to allow end users to perfrom
    >db admin functions. It seems they have changed their mind about the use
    >of the repair function. Undoubtly microsoft found a bug which made them
    >changed their recomendation. I will still continue my practice becuase

    I
    >have found it prevents the database from becoming corrupted, and therefore
    >data loss.
    >
    >I will also wish you good luck with your projects, I know you will need

    it.
    >
    >Marc
    >
    >
    >
    >"Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >>Feel free to continue your practice.
    >>
    >>Good luck. You'll probably need it.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >>http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >>
    >>
    >>"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message
    >>news:3b336171$1@news.devx.com...
    >>>
    >>> I have lost more data not repairing a database than repairing a database

    >>(none).
    >>> Multiple times the database was corrupted beyond repair and the data

    >had
    >>> to be restored from backup. If you find having people re-enter a days

    >>worth
    >>> of work acceptable, than I would not repair a database. I do not find

    >>this
    >>> acceptable. Additionally the repair is done a night, after a full backup
    >>> is completed, if the database is lost a complete backup is available.

    >>Your
    >>> faith in Access's repair capabilities leads me to believe you have not

    >>dealt
    >>> with large Access databases.
    >>>
    >>> Marc
    >>>
    >>> "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    >>> >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to.

    >>You
    >>> >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    >>> >unnecessarily.
    >>> >
    >>> >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for

    >>more
    >>> >details.
    >>> >
    >>> >HTH
    >>> >
    >>> >--
    >>> >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >>> >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message

    >>news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    >>> >>
    >>> >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this
    >>> >problem.
    >>> >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at night.
    >>> >This
    >>> >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur

    (1
    >>this
    >>> >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2

    a
    >>week).
    >>> >>
    >>> >> Marc
    >>> >>
    >>> >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    >>> >> >
    >>> >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access

    >97
    >>> >databases,
    >>> >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    >>> >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open errors
    >>> to
    >>> >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's
    >>> >CompactDatabase
    >>> >> >method.
    >>> >> >
    >>> >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if

    >a
    >>> >database
    >>> >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection
    >>> >object
    >>> >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the
    >>> >databases
    >>> >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    >>> >> >
    >>> >> >Many thanks
    >>> >> >
    >>> >> >R. Bafunno
    >>> >>
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >



  13. #13
    Douglas J. Steele Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases

    Providing a RepairDatabase method for use "if their database behaves
    unpredictably" is a big difference from running Repair on a regular basis.

    You've been lucky so far. I hope your luck continues.

    --
    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://I.Am/DougSteele/


    "marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message
    news:3b3728ec$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > A quote from Access 97 help:
    >
    > "When you attempt to open or compact a corrupted database, a run-time

    error
    > usually occurs. In some situations, however, a corrupted database may not
    > be detected, and no error occurs. It's a good idea to provide your users
    > with a way to use the RepairDatabase method in your application if their
    > database behaves unpredictably."
    >
    > Microsft even goes so far in this help file to allow end users to perfrom
    > db admin functions. It seems they have changed their mind about the use
    > of the repair function. Undoubtly microsoft found a bug which made them
    > changed their recomendation. I will still continue my practice becuase I
    > have found it prevents the database from becoming corrupted, and therefore
    > data loss.
    >
    > I will also wish you good luck with your projects, I know you will need

    it.
    >
    > Marc
    >
    >
    >
    > "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    > >Feel free to continue your practice.
    > >
    > >Good luck. You'll probably need it.
    > >
    > >--
    > >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    > >
    > >
    > >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message
    > >news:3b336171$1@news.devx.com...
    > >>
    > >> I have lost more data not repairing a database than repairing a

    database
    > >(none).
    > >> Multiple times the database was corrupted beyond repair and the data

    > had
    > >> to be restored from backup. If you find having people re-enter a days

    > >worth
    > >> of work acceptable, than I would not repair a database. I do not find

    > >this
    > >> acceptable. Additionally the repair is done a night, after a full

    backup
    > >> is completed, if the database is lost a complete backup is available.

    > >Your
    > >> faith in Access's repair capabilities leads me to believe you have not

    > >dealt
    > >> with large Access databases.
    > >>
    > >> Marc
    > >>
    > >> "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@canada.com> wrote:
    > >> >NEVER repair an Access database unless Access explicitly tells you to.

    > >You
    > >> >actually run the risk of corrupting the database if you repair it
    > >> >unnecessarily.
    > >> >
    > >> >See http://support.microsoft.com/support.../q279/3/34.asp for

    > >more
    > >> >details.
    > >> >
    > >> >HTH
    > >> >
    > >> >--
    > >> >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    > >> >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >"marc" <whale@ultranet.com> wrote in message

    > >news:3b30955d@news.devx.com...
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I have found preventative maintenence to be a good solution to this
    > >> >problem.
    > >> >> Write an application that repairs and compacts the database at

    night.
    > >> >This
    > >> >> will greatly reduce the number of database corruptions that occur (1

    > >this
    > >> >> past year with the one access database we have, down from about 2 a

    > >week).
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Marc
    > >> >>
    > >> >> "Raffaele" <software@infolandsys.com> wrote:
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >I'm working with a VB/ADO multiuser application using many Access

    > 97
    > >> >databases,
    > >> >> >all of them placed on a file-server NT station.
    > >> >> >I noticed that some DBs get corrupted quite often, causing open

    errors
    > >> to
    > >> >> >my programs and so needing a repair & compact via Access or JRO's
    > >> >CompactDatabase
    > >> >> >method.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >I'd like to know if someone ever found a way to know in advance if

    > a
    > >> >database
    > >> >> >"is going to get" corrupted, before the Open method of a Connection
    > >> >object
    > >> >> >fails, so I can develop a background task that analyzes in turn the
    > >> >databases
    > >> >> >and, if necessary, it repairs them.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >Many thanks
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >R. Bafunno
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >




  14. #14
    Reische Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    Bob:
    90% of our databases are located on a Novell server (unfortunately). We
    have never had any problems with a compact/repair function working on those
    databases. The only issues we run into with Novell is a record lock threshold
    exceeded error when attempting mass record deletes in our tables.

    HTH,
    Brenda Reische
    Application Support Analyst
    www.mdh.org

    "Bob" <rgschumann@home.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hi,
    >
    >I was planning to post a question regarding compacting Access 97 databases
    >
    >that reside on Novell servers. I had a small db, approx 3000 records on
    >a server at work that I had run the compact/repair routine.
    >
    >It worked once, but not twice. The IT department warned me after the
    >investigation, they stated that any Microsoft file residing on a Novell
    >server should never be compacted or repaired with Microsoft software,
    >specificly an Access Database.
    >
    >After reading the preceding, is there any valitity to corrupting an Access
    >db on a Novell server via Microsoft's software. Are they incompatable?
    >
    >Bob
    >



  15. #15
    Scott Ivey Guest

    Re: How to analyze corrupted Access databases


    You can get around the self-locking on a novell server by increasing the "maximum
    record locks per connection" to 10000. You can put this in the autoexec.ncf
    file on the novell server so it persists after the reboot.

    "Reische" <reische@bigfoot.com> wrote:
    >
    >Bob:
    >90% of our databases are located on a Novell server (unfortunately). We
    >have never had any problems with a compact/repair function working on those
    >databases. The only issues we run into with Novell is a record lock threshold
    >exceeded error when attempting mass record deletes in our tables.
    >
    >HTH,
    >Brenda Reische
    >Application Support Analyst
    >www.mdh.org
    >
    >"Bob" <rgschumann@home.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>I was planning to post a question regarding compacting Access 97 databases
    >>
    >>that reside on Novell servers. I had a small db, approx 3000 records on
    >>a server at work that I had run the compact/repair routine.
    >>
    >>It worked once, but not twice. The IT department warned me after the
    >>investigation, they stated that any Microsoft file residing on a Novell
    >>server should never be compacted or repaired with Microsoft software,
    >>specificly an Access Database.
    >>
    >>After reading the preceding, is there any valitity to corrupting an Access
    >>db on a Novell server via Microsoft's software. Are they incompatable?
    >>
    >>Bob
    >>

    >



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