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Thread: Companies Using .NET

  1. #31
    Bob Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    Yesterday, at DevDays in Austin, it was mentioned that Texaco had a large
    ASP.NET application running in production.

    Bob

  2. #32
    DotNet Programmer Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET


    Bob <rainsleyno@bodyspamsolutions.com> wrote:
    >Yesterday, at DevDays in Austin, it was mentioned that Texaco had a large


    >ASP.NET application running in production.


    Do you have a cite? I can't use anything I can't back up.


  3. #33
    Jonathan Allen Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    Some colleges still teach Pascal as a prerequisite to C.

    --
    Jonathan Allen



    "Arthur Wood" <wooda@saic-trsc.com> wrote in message
    news:3be93f41$1@147.208.176.211...
    >
    > for whatever it is worth (maybe 2-cents, if you are lucky), the BIGGEST

    problem
    > with Delphi was that the underlying language was PASCAL, which is "used"
    > by about as many people as use "sanscrit" as their first language

    (actually
    > not quite THAT bad, but you get the idea).
    >
    > Arthur Wood
    >
    >
    >
    > "Cali LaFollett" <cali@no-spam-please-visionized.com> wrote:
    > >> No, not at all. There still aren't any jobs for .Net,
    > >> so I have little interest. Java was the same way,
    > >> it wasn't viable for three years. That's a long
    > >> time between meal tickets.
    > >>
    > >> So far, .Net is looking pretty similiar to Delphi. A
    > >> big splash when it came out, several "big name"
    > >> companies doing projects with the beta...
    > >>
    > >> but in the end, Delphi never achieved a critical mass.

    > >
    > >
    > >Well, I am not too sure about the "aren't any jobs" part. My wife used to

    > be
    > >a technical recruiter and still talks to and visits them on their forums

    > and
    > >various job boards. From what she can gather, the jobs have picked up

    quite
    > >a bit over the last month or two.
    > >
    > >It could be rather interesting to see how it pans out. I can say this

    much,
    > >unlike Delphi, this one has every nich in this wild and crazy tech market
    > >buzzing, especially the Linux folk. Not saying that this is good or bad

    > but
    > >it means that people are paying attention and if it starts to show signs

    > of
    > >success, I personally believe people will jump on the band wagon which

    will
    > >only cause the snowball to roll faster.
    > >
    > >Take it for what it's worth...
    > >
    > >Cal
    > >
    > >

    >



  4. #34
    Bob Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    X-Newsreader: MicroPlanet Gravity v2.50
    NNTP-Posting-Host: 216.54.250.195
    X-Trace: 7 Nov 2001 18:16:06 GMT, 216.54.250.195
    Lines: 14
    Path: 147.208.176.211
    Xref: 147.208.176.211 vb.dotnet.discussion:32480

    In article <3be972e2$1@147.208.176.211>, DotNetProgrammer99@hotmail.com
    says...
    >
    > Bob <rainsleyno@bodyspamsolutions.com> wrote:
    > >Yesterday, at DevDays in Austin, it was mentioned that Texaco had a large

    >
    > >ASP.NET application running in production.

    >
    > Do you have a cite? I can't use anything I can't back up.
    >
    >

    I'm afraid not. It was probably an MCS employee out of Houston.

    Bob

  5. #35
    Bob Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    In article <3be97464$1@147.208.176.211>, JGrass@AbilitiSolutions.com says...
    > At DevDays yesterday they also talked about Dollar Rent-A-Car and Southwest
    > Airlines using Web Services, at least. . .
    >
    > --
    > Jacob Grass
    > Microsoft .NET MVP
    >

    Jacob,

    That's an interesting comment about Southwest Airlines since one of the
    presenters in Austin said that Southwest Airlines was strictly a UNIX shop.
    I guess Microsoft needs to get their story straight.

    Bob

  6. #36
    W.E. (Bill) Goodrich, PhD Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    In article <3be6f073$1@147.208.176.211>,
    "Patrick Troughton" <Patrick@Troughton.com> writes:

    > "W.E. (Bill) Goodrich, PhD" <bgoodric@earthlink.net> wrote:
    > >In article <3be6d801$1@147.208.176.211>,
    > >"Jacob Grass" <JGrass@AbilitiSolutions.com> writes:


    > >> There are five here:


    > >And eleven using VS6 instead, in that same place.


    > And?


    For his purposes - presenting a 'bandwagon' case to the CIO - that
    combination weakens his case.

    > > But it should
    > >be noted that your cite is PR page of Micro$oft's rather than a
    > >neutral resource.


    > He was just asking for a list of companies using .NET.


    Not quite. He was asking for such a list for the stated purpose of
    convincing his CIO to become an early adopter of .NET.

    > Unless you're claiming that these companies are *not* really using
    > .NET after all, your objection is irrelevent to the question that
    > was asked.


    Not irrelevant at all. For his specific use, that list (and the site
    it is on) is a very poor resource. Aside from the issue of obvious
    bias, the page only indicates that some *part* of the listed company
    made some limited use of some *subset* of .NET for a particular
    project, with results that the PR types could "spin" in a positive
    manner. Hardly an effective tool to "alleviate her concern" as he
    puts it. Especially when she (the CIO) sees the extent to which those
    "cases" represent projects which are not completed or released. If,
    as he asserts, she is "reluctant to use any technology until it's been
    out for two years," such cases are more likely to convince her that he
    is somewhat out of touch with the realities of the situation. Instead
    of bolstering his case, he could hurt it - and his own standing in the
    company.

    > > Any attempt to cite it as justification for some
    > >business decision may well backfire. It should also be noted that
    > >one of the two other cited companies is a part of Micro$oft itself,
    > >and therefore unlikely to be viewed as meaningful by that CIO.


    > Oh, you must be one of those anti-.NET religious zealots.


    Not at all. But I have been severely critical of the changes to VB,
    which basically disenfranchise a significant portion of its current
    user base. And I have also been severely critical of Micro$oft's move
    toward "subscription licensing" and their recent "registration" games.
    As well as their illegal business practices.

    > It must really bother you to see companies using .NET already...


    Not really. But it does somewhat bother me to see misrepresentations of
    the nature or extent of that use. As to the people "using .NET already",
    I will be interested to see the extent to which they bloody their noses
    on the same sorts of problems that have bitten other early adopters
    (especially EOs of Micro$oft products). It will also be interesting to
    see the effects of the eventual outcomes of the antitrust litigation -
    especially the parts being pushed by the States (such as California)
    which are opposing the Bush Administration "settlement".

    While the (above) CIO's position is generally prudent, in the current
    situation it seems especially appropriate.

    --

    W.E. (Bill) Goodrich, PhD

    *-----------------------*--------------------------------------------*
    * CHANGE YOUR SEXUALITY * http://www.nyx.net/~bgoodric/ctg.html *
    * * *
    * Without Aversive * ctgcentral@earthlink.net *
    * Behavior Modification * Creative Technology Group *
    * or Drugs * PO Box 286 *
    * * Englewood, CO 80151-0286 *
    *-----------------------*--------------------------------------------*

  7. #37
    Patrick Steele Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    In article <3BE98CC8.148379F5@earthlink.net> (from W.E. (Bill) Goodrich,
    PhD <bgoodric@earthlink.net>),
    > > He was just asking for a list of companies using .NET.

    >
    > Not quite. He was asking for such a list for the stated purpose of
    > convincing his CIO to become an early adopter of .NET.


    That's not the way I read it. In looking for this list he stated:

    "I think if we can compile a list of companies that are currently doing
    ..NET development, it might alleviate her concern."

    Sounds like the CIO has legitimate concerns about adopting new
    technologies (rightly so). It didn't seem like he was try to
    "convince" her that .NET was the way to go, but more to assure her that
    ..NET is a viable platform -- which, in the end, could lead to acceptance
    of .NET.

    --
    Patrick Steele
    Microsoft .NET MVP

  8. #38
    Jacob Grass Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    > That's an interesting comment about Southwest Airlines since one of the
    > presenters in Austin said that Southwest Airlines was strictly a UNIX

    shop.
    > I guess Microsoft needs to get their story straight.


    Bob-

    They mentioned that during the presentation as well. . . I believe the story
    was that they were investigating a CORBA solution and began working on it
    when they were introduced to WebServices. They realized that it would be
    quicker for them to go the web service route. I believe they said that even
    though the Web Services are implemented, they are continuing the CORBA route
    just in case. . .

    Jacob



  9. #39
    W.E. (Bill) Goodrich, PhD Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    In article <MPG.165365446fdd9ea398987a@news.devx.com>,
    Patrick Steele <psteele@ipdsolution.com_> writes:

    > In article <3BE98CC8.148379F5@earthlink.net> (from W.E. (Bill)
    > Goodrich, PhD <bgoodric@earthlink.net>),


    > > > He was just asking for a list of companies using .NET.


    > > Not quite. He was asking for such a list for the stated purpose
    > > of convincing his CIO to become an early adopter of .NET.


    > That's not the way I read it. In looking for this list he stated:


    > "I think if we can compile a list of companies that are currently
    > doing .NET development, it might alleviate her concern."


    Or, more fully:

    : Many of the programmers at my job are really excited about .NET. We
    : have a couple major projects on the horizon and naturally, we would
    : love to do them in .NET. There are a lot of good business reasons for
    : doing them in .NET, however, our CIO is reluctant to use any
    : technology until it's been out for two years, no matter how good the
    : technology might be. I think if we can compile a list of companies
    : that are currently doing .NET development, it might alleviate her
    : concern.

    And then the part you cited.

    > Sounds like the CIO has legitimate concerns about adopting new
    > technologies (rightly so).


    I agree.

    > It didn't seem like he was try to "convince" her that .NET was the
    > way to go, but more to assure her that .NET is a viable platform --
    > which, in the end, could lead to acceptance of .NET.


    But with the rest of the paragraph, it looks more like he(?) is trying
    to convince her to allow those "many programmers" to use .NET for
    those "major projects" - and compiling the list toward that end. But
    there is no need for speculation. We can just ask him(?).

    How about it, "DotNet Programmer"? Which interpretation is closer to
    your intended use of that list?

    And FWIW, are you "he" or "she"? It doesn't much matter, but it would
    be nice to be able to use the appropriate pronoun.

    --

    W.E. (Bill) Goodrich, PhD

    *-----------------------*--------------------------------------------*
    * CHANGE YOUR SEXUALITY * http://www.nyx.net/~bgoodric/ctg.html *
    * * *
    * Without Aversive * ctgcentral@earthlink.net *
    * Behavior Modification * Creative Technology Group *
    * or Drugs * PO Box 286 *
    * * Englewood, CO 80151-0286 *
    *-----------------------*--------------------------------------------*

  10. #40
    Jonathan Allen Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    > That's an interesting comment about Southwest Airlines since one of the
    > presenters in Austin said that Southwest Airlines was strictly a UNIX

    shop.

    So? The whole point of web services is that it does not matter what OS is
    behind the scenes. If it was meant to be a MS only technology, they would
    not have worked with the W3C.

    --
    Jonathan Allen



    "Bob" <rainsleyno@bodyspamsolutions.com> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1653459d7f92468498969f@news.devx.com...
    > In article <3be97464$1@147.208.176.211>, JGrass@AbilitiSolutions.com

    says...
    > > At DevDays yesterday they also talked about Dollar Rent-A-Car and

    Southwest
    > > Airlines using Web Services, at least. . .
    > >
    > > --
    > > Jacob Grass
    > > Microsoft .NET MVP
    > >

    > Jacob,
    >
    > That's an interesting comment about Southwest Airlines since one of the
    > presenters in Austin said that Southwest Airlines was strictly a UNIX

    shop.
    > I guess Microsoft needs to get their story straight.
    >
    > Bob



  11. #41
    Who Cared? Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET


    "Who Cares?" <venetian7@home.net> wrote:

    > So far, .Net is looking pretty similiar to Delphi. A
    > big splash when it came out, several "big name"
    > companies doing projects with the beta...
    >
    > but in the end, Delphi never achieved a critical mass.
    >


    Excuse me, could I borrow your crystal ball of prognostication for a day
    or two? I need to look up some lottery numbers.


  12. #42
    Who Cares? Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    "Who Cared?" <whocared@home.net> wrote in message
    news:3be9a76e$1@147.208.176.211...
    >
    > Excuse me, could I borrow your crystal ball of prognostication for a day
    > or two? I need to look up some lottery numbers.



    Sure. Get a business degree, learn about the "S-curve".
    Take some calculus and understand the concept of
    "rate of change", then find a way to measure it.

    I like to use keyword searches on Dice.com.

    Then track various keywords for years and
    see how technical buzzword trends conform
    to the "S-curve", regardless of how brilliant
    the current geeks are.

    Jiminy christmas, chum, what are you so worked
    up about?


    SAP, take III -
    http://www.headlinewatch.com/ajb/2-118,208-103,18825175

    "SAP has selected Java as the "open" programming language of the future"

    Oops. I guess the original story was right, after all.


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/bus...00/1640869.stm
    "this last minute hitch to the settlement is seen as bad news for Microsoft"

    Oops.




  13. #43
    Who Cares? Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET


    "Jonathan Allen" <greywolf@cts.com> wrote in message
    news:3be9994e@147.208.176.211...
    > > That's an interesting comment about Southwest Airlines since one of the
    > > presenters in Austin said that Southwest Airlines was strictly a UNIX

    > shop.
    >
    > So? The whole point of web services is that it does not matter what OS is
    > behind the scenes. If it was meant to be a MS only technology, they would
    > not have worked with the W3C.



    But which "web service"? Egad, now this is out
    of hand. I thought somebody was compiling
    a list of .Net companies, not "web service"
    companies.

    Look at this comment -

    http://techupdate.zdnet.com/techupda...099254,00.html

    "[SAP] insisted it would provide connectivity, through Web services, to .Net
    applications"


    In other words, they'll provide an adapter through their foundational
    Java-based web services if they think enough .Net demand is there.

    The problem with .Net is twofold -

    #1 - Me, personally, I think it was put together with more thought
    to politics than to scalability and reliability. And I think that
    enough lines of code will bring out reliability issues.

    #2 - It's from Microsoft. You just can't trust them anymore.






  14. #44
    Bob Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET

    In article <3be9994e@147.208.176.211>, greywolf@cts.com says...
    > > That's an interesting comment about Southwest Airlines since one of the
    > > presenters in Austin said that Southwest Airlines was strictly a UNIX

    > shop.
    >
    > So? The whole point of web services is that it does not matter what OS is
    > behind the scenes. If it was meant to be a MS only technology, they would
    > not have worked with the W3C.
    >
    > --
    > Jonathan Allen
    >

    The point is there seems to be some confusion at Microsoft as to exactly
    what Southwest is doing. I just really want to make sure I have accurate
    information.

    Bob

  15. #45
    DotNet Programmer Guest

    Re: Companies Using .NET


    >How about it, "DotNet Programmer"? Which interpretation is closer to
    >your intended use of that list?


    Well, I'm not sure I understand the distinction. Basically, I want to compile
    a list in case our CIO says something like, "well, .NET is too new and unproven.
    It's not a good idea for a company to use something so new" and I could say,
    "Well, lots of companies are already using .NET: Verizon, eBay, etc."

    The longer the list, the better. The bigger the names, the better. Obviously,
    a cite from eWeek or CNET is better than a cite from Microsoft, but if the
    cite is legit, it's legit. If I compile a list of with 50 companies, I can
    always trim it down later. But right now, I want everything.

    I guess a potential point of confusion would be the case of a company exposing
    a web service without actually using .NET to write this web service. In such
    a case, I would say that it is not using .NET.

    BTW, I want to be clear, there are lots of legitimate business reasons for
    using .NET at my company. My argument is not simply, "Well, everyone else
    is doing it, so should we."

    >And FWIW, are you "he" or "she"? It doesn't much matter, but it would
    >be nice to be able to use the appropriate pronoun.


    I'm a 'he'.

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