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Thread: MS Betting the company on .NET?

  1. #1
    max caber Guest

    MS Betting the company on .NET?


    I have read many quotes that MS is "betting the company on .NET". I see .NET
    as a really great development platform (C# language, API, Compiler and VM)
    that is supported by some but not all versions of Windows.

    But I see MS as a seller of operating systems (NT2000, XP, CE, 98/95), Office
    Suite applications(Word, Excel, PP, Access), game boxes (XBox), ISP (MSN),
    a Web Portal (MSN.com), a news channel (MSNBC), a Relational Database Management
    System (MSSQL Server), and a few other key products.

    Most of the above will not be touch by .NET for years, and have/will generate
    revenue independent of the success/failure of .NET. By the way, I hope .NET
    does succeed even beyond MS because it is the best (Language/API to date).

    So how is MS betting the "entire" company on .NET?

    Your thoughts..............




  2. #2
    Robert Boban Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    First MS.NET server is MS SQL 2000, all future .NET servers are based on Win2K
    and of course XP, Office Object model is full .NET ready, MSN.COM is first
    portal based on .NET .... etc etc ... ????


    "max caber" <maxcaber@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >I have read many quotes that MS is "betting the company on .NET". I see

    .NET
    >as a really great development platform (C# language, API, Compiler and VM)
    >that is supported by some but not all versions of Windows.
    >
    >But I see MS as a seller of operating systems (NT2000, XP, CE, 98/95), Office
    >Suite applications(Word, Excel, PP, Access), game boxes (XBox), ISP (MSN),
    >a Web Portal (MSN.com), a news channel (MSNBC), a Relational Database Management
    >System (MSSQL Server), and a few other key products.
    >
    >Most of the above will not be touch by .NET for years, and have/will generate
    >revenue independent of the success/failure of .NET. By the way, I hope

    .NET
    >does succeed even beyond MS because it is the best (Language/API to date).
    >
    >So how is MS betting the "entire" company on .NET?
    >
    >Your thoughts..............
    >
    >
    >



  3. #3
    Jonathan Allen Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?

    It is just an expression to that indicates how important it is to MS.
    Literally speaking, you cannot bet a company on a product.

    --
    Jonathan Allen



    "max caber" <maxcaber@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:3bf9edc6$1@147.208.176.211...
    >
    > I have read many quotes that MS is "betting the company on .NET". I see

    ..NET
    > as a really great development platform (C# language, API, Compiler and VM)
    > that is supported by some but not all versions of Windows.
    >
    > But I see MS as a seller of operating systems (NT2000, XP, CE, 98/95),

    Office
    > Suite applications(Word, Excel, PP, Access), game boxes (XBox), ISP (MSN),
    > a Web Portal (MSN.com), a news channel (MSNBC), a Relational Database

    Management
    > System (MSSQL Server), and a few other key products.
    >
    > Most of the above will not be touch by .NET for years, and have/will

    generate
    > revenue independent of the success/failure of .NET. By the way, I hope

    ..NET
    > does succeed even beyond MS because it is the best (Language/API to date).
    >
    > So how is MS betting the "entire" company on .NET?
    >
    > Your thoughts..............
    >
    >
    >




  4. #4
    Patrice Scribe Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?

    It is likely that .NET will be really the corner stone for upcoming MS
    products. With .NET MS could quite easily sell its software over the
    Internet, download modules as they are needed (or fixed).

    In a sense you could see .NET as a new "abstract" OS that runs on top of
    Windows and that will provide its services to new MS products.

    Patrice

    "max caber" <maxcaber@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message news:
    3bf9edc6$1@147.208.176.211...
    >
    > I have read many quotes that MS is "betting the company on .NET". I see

    ..NET
    > as a really great development platform (C# language, API, Compiler and VM)
    > that is supported by some but not all versions of Windows.
    >
    > But I see MS as a seller of operating systems (NT2000, XP, CE, 98/95),

    Office
    > Suite applications(Word, Excel, PP, Access), game boxes (XBox), ISP (MSN),
    > a Web Portal (MSN.com), a news channel (MSNBC), a Relational Database

    Management
    > System (MSSQL Server), and a few other key products.
    >
    > Most of the above will not be touch by .NET for years, and have/will

    generate
    > revenue independent of the success/failure of .NET. By the way, I hope

    ..NET
    > does succeed even beyond MS because it is the best (Language/API to date).
    >
    > So how is MS betting the "entire" company on .NET?
    >
    > Your thoughts..............
    >
    >
    >




  5. #5
    Mike McCann Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    "Jonathan Allen" <greywolf@cts.com> wrote in message
    news:3bfa13ba@147.208.176.211...
    > It is just an expression to that indicates how important it is to MS.
    > Literally speaking, you cannot bet a company on a product.
    >
    > --

    Jonathan,

    There are many ex-CEOs and former small business owners who would like to
    disagree with you.

    Mike




  6. #6
    Patrick Troughton Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    Hi Max,

    I agree that the "betting the company on .NET" is mostly an exageration,
    especially at this point. However, I do want to point out that MSNBC is using
    .NET....

    http://www.thedotnetmag.com/magazine..._1/default.asp

    ...and the next version of SQL Server which is currently in development will
    incoorporate .NET technology. Sorry, no cite!

    /Pat

    "max caber" <maxcaber@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >I have read many quotes that MS is "betting the company on .NET". I see

    .NET
    >as a really great development platform (C# language, API, Compiler and VM)
    >that is supported by some but not all versions of Windows.
    >
    >But I see MS as a seller of operating systems (NT2000, XP, CE, 98/95), Office
    >Suite applications(Word, Excel, PP, Access), game boxes (XBox), ISP (MSN),
    >a Web Portal (MSN.com), a news channel (MSNBC), a Relational Database Management
    >System (MSSQL Server), and a few other key products.
    >
    >Most of the above will not be touch by .NET for years, and have/will generate
    >revenue independent of the success/failure of .NET. By the way, I hope

    .NET
    >does succeed even beyond MS because it is the best (Language/API to date).
    >
    >So how is MS betting the "entire" company on .NET?
    >
    >Your thoughts..............
    >
    >
    >



  7. #7
    Rob Teixeira Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    "Patrick Troughton" <Patrick@Troughton.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hi Max,


    [snip]

    >...and the next version of SQL Server which is currently in development

    will
    >incoorporate .NET technology. Sorry, no cite!
    >
    >/Pat


    And if i remember correctly, someone mentioned the possibility of writing
    stored procs in VB.NET and C#.
    I've got mixed feelings about that, if turns out to be true.

    -Rob

  8. #8
    Kunle Odutola Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    "max caber" <maxcaber@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:3bf9edc6$1@147.208.176.211...
    >
    > I have read many quotes that MS is "betting the company on .NET". I see

    ..NET
    > as a really great development platform (C# language, API, Compiler and VM)
    > that is supported by some but not all versions of Windows.
    >
    > But I see MS as a seller of operating systems (NT2000, XP, CE, 98/95),

    Office
    > Suite applications(Word, Excel, PP, Access), game boxes (XBox), ISP (MSN),
    > a Web Portal (MSN.com), a news channel (MSNBC), a Relational Database

    Management
    > System (MSSQL Server), and a few other key products.
    >
    > Most of the above will not be touch by .NET for years, and have/will

    generate
    > revenue independent of the success/failure of .NET. By the way, I hope

    ..NET
    > does succeed even beyond MS because it is the best (Language/API to date).
    >
    > So how is MS betting the "entire" company on .NET?


    It isn't. Literally or Actually.

    When fully managed code versions of all [applicable] MS products such as
    Office, SQL Server, MSMQ, IIS, FrontPage, Project, Great Plains etc appear
    (given the issues with source code recovery from IL) then it might be
    considered to have truly bet the company on .NET ;-)

    Kunle

    PS Expecting OS products to be developed in managed code is plain
    silly....isn't it?



  9. #9
    Patrick Troughton Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    Hi Rob,

    Really? I'm looking forward to writing stored procedures in a real programming
    language.

    Anyway, here's a partial cite. It's a column my company's DBA forwarded to
    me in an e-mail. He didn't include the link, so I can't identify the author
    of the column, but it does mention Yukon's ability to run stored procedures
    in VB.NET and C#.

    ----

    During the Microsoft TechEd 2001 conference opening keynote, Microsoft
    Senior Vice President Paul Flessner, who's in charge of the .NET Enterprise
    Server Division, captivated SQL Server professionals with a demo of Yukon.
    The demo highlighted Yukon's ability to run stored procedures written in
    native
    Microsoft .NET languages such as C#. For those of you too busy to keep
    up with releases that are more than a year away, Yukon is the code name
    for the next major release of SQL Server, tentatively planned for
    release in late 2002 or early 2003.

    One of Yukon's most significant enhancements will be its ability to run
    stored procedures written in any .NET language. Although this capability
    will extend SQL Server's programmability, I have mixed feelings about
    it. On the positive side, .NET stored procedures will open up a new
    realm of application architecture and deployment options. On the
    negative side, .NET stored procedures will make it much easier for
    developers to build and roll out poorly architected database solutions.
    The problem isn't the powerful new technology but what we'll do with it.
    I'm worried about putting a power saw in the hands of someone who has a
    hard time operating scissors.

    If you're a regular reader of this column, you know I often discuss
    training--or the lack thereof--in the SQL Server community. My comments
    aren't meant to slam database professionals who are simply overwhelmed
    and can't possibly know everything. I'm the first to admit that my own
    database skills are deep in certain areas and more shallow than I'd like
    in many other areas. Unfortunately, today's technology makes it easy to
    build poorly architected solutions. Why? Like it or not, no one can be
    an "expert" in everything involved in building complex, end-to-end
    applications. And letting developers create .NET-based stored procedures
    takes this problem to a new and unprecedented level of danger.

    The fact that most nondatabase-savvy developers don't know T-SQL has
    created a barrier that prevents many of them from working with the
    database server. .NET-based procedures remove this barrier, allowing
    almost anyone to create inefficient code that will run inside SQL
    Server. Developers have always been able to create bloated, inefficient
    data-access code. But nearly all that code runs on a separate physical
    server because most people are sane enough to install application code
    and SQL Server on separate boxes. Letting developers write inefficient
    data-access code that runs inside the database engine will further
    compound the scalability and performance problems built in to many of
    today's systems. Making matters worse, the typical DBA will be clueless
    when it comes to debugging or troubleshooting .NET procedure code in SQL
    Server.

    I know I've painted a picture of doom and gloom, but here's the bright
    side. First, .NET-based stored procedures will let us use SQL Server in
    new and interesting ways; after all, no one claims that T-SQL is a
    robust, common programming language. Second, the knowledge gap between
    .NET-only architects and SQL Server-only architects will create a
    lucrative niche market for the savvy database professionals who spend
    the next 18 months upgrading their skills for all things .NET.

    Are you a DBA? Don't know Visual Basic (VB)? Been thinking you need to
    brush up on your development skills? I can't overstate the importance of
    learning .NET or at least its data-access portions. Sooner than you
    think, you'll be hard-pressed to see where .NET ends and the database
    begins. And if you're not careful, your T-SQL-only skills will land you
    in the same camp as the COBOL-only dinosaurs of yesterday.

    ----

    /Pat

    "Rob Teixeira" <RobTeixeira@@msn.com> wrote:
    >
    >"Patrick Troughton" <Patrick@Troughton.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>Hi Max,

    >
    >[snip]
    >
    >>...and the next version of SQL Server which is currently in development

    >will
    >>incoorporate .NET technology. Sorry, no cite!
    >>
    >>/Pat

    >
    >And if i remember correctly, someone mentioned the possibility of writing
    >stored procs in VB.NET and C#.
    >I've got mixed feelings about that, if turns out to be true.
    >
    >-Rob



  10. #10
    MarkN Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    I have mixed feelings about stored procs, period. They are DB specific, so
    if you are going to write them it might as well be in a language like C#.
    Writing/maintaining stored procs in T-SQL/PL SQL/etc. is horrible awful.


  11. #11
    Patrick Troughton Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    I found another cite, this time with a link....

    ---

    Yukon's CLR integration will have full parity with T-SQL (SVR409: SQL Server
    .NET Programmability). Jet may be dead, but at least one element of its original
    architecture will reincarnate into the next release of SQL Server: You'll
    be able to store assemblies that implement functions (with optional indexes
    for the table-valued variety), stored procedures, and data types in your
    databases. The managed code runs in the SQL Server process and Microsoft
    promises that performance of compiled CLR code will be equal to or better
    than equivalent interpreted T-SQL operations. Yukon will support multiple
    statements per connection and deliver Multiple Active Resultsets (MARS).
    You'll have to wait for the next version of Visual Studio .NET to use the
    newly defined SqlResultSet objects. Look for the first Yukon beta in mid-2002
    and RTM in 2003.

    ---

    http://www.fawcette.com/vsm/2001_12/...rver/page2.asp

    /Pat

    "Patrick Troughton" <Patrick@Troughton.com> wrote:
    >
    >Anyway, here's a partial cite. It's a column my company's DBA forwarded

    to
    >me in an e-mail. He didn't include the link, so I can't identify the author
    >of the column, but it does mention Yukon's ability to run stored procedures
    >in VB.NET and C#.



  12. #12
    Bob Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?

    In article <3bfa13ba@147.208.176.211>, greywolf@cts.com says...
    > It is just an expression to that indicates how important it is to MS.
    > Literally speaking, you cannot bet a company on a product.
    >
    > --
    > Jonathan Allen
    >

    Jonathan,

    Does the name "Netscape" come to mind?

    Bob

  13. #13
    max caber Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    "Robert Boban" <filipusis@hotmail.com> wrote:

    First MS.NET server is MS SQL 2000, all future .NET servers are based on
    Win2K and of course XP, Office Object model is full .NET ready, MSN.COM is
    first
    portal based on .NET .... etc etc ... ????

    Robert,
    What do you mean by the above? Are you stating that MS SQL 2000 is written
    in managed code? If not, then what is .NET but an acronym that MS can tack
    onto any product?
    Max


  14. #14
    max caber Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?


    "Kunle Odutola" <kunle.odutola@<REMOVETHIS>okocha.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

    "When fully managed code versions of all [applicable] MS products such as
    Office, SQL Server, MSMQ, IIS, FrontPage, Project, Great Plains etc appear
    (given the issues with source code recovery from IL) then it might be
    considered to have truly bet the company on .NET ;-)"

    Kunle,
    I could not have answered my own question better.
    Thanks,
    Max

  15. #15
    Jonathan Allen Guest

    Re: MS Betting the company on .NET?

    > Does the name "Netscape" come to mind?

    They did not say, "I bet we can sell 10 Million copies. If we lose, you can
    have all our stock.". They were purchased by the AOL-TimeWarner, probably
    for way more then they were worth.

    --
    Jonathan Allen



    "Bob" <rainsleyno@bodyspamsolutions.com> wrote in message
    news:MPG.166432d4ce446a8e9896af@news.devx.com...
    > In article <3bfa13ba@147.208.176.211>, greywolf@cts.com says...
    > > It is just an expression to that indicates how important it is to MS.
    > > Literally speaking, you cannot bet a company on a product.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Jonathan Allen
    > >

    > Jonathan,
    >
    > Does the name "Netscape" come to mind?
    >
    > Bob



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