Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002


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Thread: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

  1. #1
    Yair Alan Griver [MSFT] Guest

    Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    Status Report - Jan. 31, 2002



    Hey folks,



    Here's my latest status report - just to let everyone know what I've been up
    to. I'll be posting these occasionally to let you know what's coming down
    the pike.



    1.. I've been setting up the infrastructure so that we can standardize on
    having a chat around 3 weeks after some of our whitepapers. Then we'll link
    from the chat transcript to the whitepaper. Gives people a chance to read up
    on a topic, and then get assistance on it as well.
    2.. I'm working with the product team to set up regular "Newsgroup and Web
    Site" blasts - where we'd get together in a room for an hour and answer
    messages online. Watch this space for more info as it gells.
    3.. Once #2 is set up, we're thinking of setting up a "topical blast"
    where a topic would be selected, folks could post messages for a week, and
    then we'd come online and work on those questions and set up white papers on
    it as well.
    4.. I got community feedback into an upcoming whitepaper on .NET and
    Interop - thanks to everyone who helped out - I'll let you know when the
    paper comes out!


    Upcoming chats (http://msdn.microsoft.com/chats):

    Windows Forms
    Tuesday, February 12, 2002, 1:00 - 2:00 P.M. Pacific time (21:00 - 22:00
    GMT)
    While this session will initially cover the material in the "Essential Code
    for Windows Forms Dialog Boxes", "Shaped Windows Forms and Controls in
    Visual Studio .NET", and "Using Windows XP Visual Styles With Controls on
    Windows Forms" whitepapers, please feel free to ask any Windows
    Forms-related questions you may have.

    Under The Covers With the Common Language Runtime
    Thursday, January 31, 2002, 12:00 - 1:00 P.M. Pacific time (20:00 - 21:00
    GMT)
    The common language runtime (CLR) is the core of the .NET Framework. Built
    on top of operating system services, it is responsible for executing .NET
    applications-ensuring that all application dependencies are met, managing
    memory, handling security, language integration and so on. The runtime
    supplies many services that help simplify code development and application
    deployment while also improving application reliability. Brad Abrams, .NET
    Framework Lead Program Manager and Jim Hogg, Common Language Runtime Program
    Manager, will be available to answer your questions about CLR.

    .NET Remoting
    Friday, February 1, 2002, 3:00 - 4:00 P.M. Pacific time (23:00 - 24:00 GMT)
    The .NET Remoting development team will address your questions about .NET
    Remoting, including how .NET Remoting can be used to create distributed
    applications with .NET and how it can be extended with pluggable channels,
    formatters and other powerful extensibility points. The chat will also cover
    security, configuration and versioning.

    XML Web Services Interoperability
    Thursday, February 7, 2002, 12:00 - 1:00 P.M. Pacific time (20:00 - 21:00
    GMT)
    The promise of XML Web services rests on interoperability and ubiquity. Open
    standards and rigorous multi-vendor testing ensure that a rich community of
    Web services implementations will proliferate. Join us in this session with
    Keith Ballinger and Yann Christensen from the team that brought you ASP.NET'
    s Web services stack as we discuss Microsoft's work in XML Web services
    interoperability.


    Executive Chat with Jim Allchin: Visual Studio .NET
    Tuesday, February 12, 2002, 3:00 - 4:00 P.M. Pacific time (23:00 - 24:00
    GMT)
    Visual Studio .NET is the comprehensive tool for rapidly building and
    integrating XML Web services and applications, dramatically increasing
    developer productivity and enabling new business opportunities. Talk to Jim
    Allchin, Microsoft Group Vice President, about how Visual Studio .NET
    improves developer productivity and enables new business opportunities.


    Get Into the Visual Studio .NET Integrated Development Environment
    Wednesday, February 13, 2002, 4:00 - 5:00 P.M. Pacific time (24:00 - 1:00
    GMT)
    Visual Studio .NET provides a single shared integrated development
    environment (IDE) to improve developer productivity and to provide an
    extensible foundation for 3rd party .NET languages and tools. In this
    session Doug Hodges, Software Architect for the IDE, will be available to
    answer your questions and provide tips and tricks for improving your
    development productivity.


    Executive Chat with Eric Rudder: Global XML Web Services Architecture
    Monday, February 18, 2002, 4:00 - 5:00 P.M. Pacific time (24:00 - 1:00 GMT)
    The Global XML Web Services Architecture (GXA) provides principles,
    specifications and guidelines for advancing today's XML Web services
    standards. This allows XML Web services to address more sophisticated and
    complex tasks in standard ways. Through the GXA, XML Web services will
    continue to advance while remaining the interoperable fabric of application
    internetworking. Microsoft Senior Vice President Eric Rudder will be
    available to answer your questions about the GXA and what it means for XML
    Web services.


    Executive Chat with Yuval Neeman: Enterprise Development
    Wednesday, February 20, 2002, 3:00 - 4:00 P.M. Pacific time (23:00 - 24:00
    GMT)
    Enterprise product development, in many ways, is very similar to traditional
    development. However, enterprise customers tend to be very systematic as
    opposed to opportunistic in their approach to building applications.
    Successfully building complex enterprise applications requires a solid
    architecture and a common understanding of requirements across the
    development team. Talk to Yuval Neeman, Microsoft Vice President, about
    Enterprise development challenges today and how Visual Studio .NET
    Enterprise toolset addresses some of these challenges including design,
    development, deployment and security.


    Visual Studio .NET Enterprise Architect Tools
    Tuesday, April 2, 2002, 2:00 - 3:00 P.M. Pacific time (22:00 - 23:00 GMT)
    Successfully building complex enterprise applications requires a solid
    architecture and a common understanding of requirements across the
    development team. The role of an architect is typically to help their
    organizations build applications that scale, integrate with existing
    systems, fulfill business requirements, and be maintainable over multiple
    versions of the product. In this session, Keith Short, Software Architect
    for enterprise features within Visual Studio will answer your questions
    about the tools Visual Studio .NET Enterprise Architect provides for
    architects to build enterprise applications in a systematic, repeatable and
    predictable manner.



    White Papers released this week - available from
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/net/guide/ (dates after the title are tentative
    chat dates):



    Creating Web Server Control Templates Programmatically (2/19/02)

    Illustrates how to create templates in code for the Repeater, DataList, and
    DataGrid ASP.NET server controls, showing examples in both Visual Basic .NET
    and Visual C# .NET.

    Top Questions about the DataGrid Web Server Control (3/19/02)

    Answers frequently asked questions about using the DataGrid Web server
    control.

    Working with Single-File Web Forms Pages in Visual Studio .NET (3/21/02)

    Provides an overview of single-file Web Forms pages, how to work with
    single-file pages in Visual Studio, and how to convert single-file Web Forms
    pages to code-behind Web Forms pages.






  2. #2
    John Butler Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002


    "Yair Alan Griver [MSFT]" <yag@microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:3c59a9a1$1@10.1.10.29...
    > Status Report - Jan. 31, 2002
    > .NET Remoting
    > Friday, February 1, 2002, 3:00 - 4:00 P.M. Pacific time (23:00 - 24:00

    GMT)

    eek 23:00 GMT.... that's a seriously anti-social time... I'm a sad
    *******...but not that sad!!!



  3. #3
    Jay Glynn Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    2 questions on the chats.

    Will there be transcripts available?
    Can we supply questions beforehand in case we are not available for the
    chat?




  4. #4
    Steve Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    Yeh, and Buffy's on at 23.35 GMT!

    Steve

    "John Butler" <nospamjrbutler@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:3c59d886$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > "Yair Alan Griver [MSFT]" <yag@microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:3c59a9a1$1@10.1.10.29...
    > > Status Report - Jan. 31, 2002
    > > .NET Remoting
    > > Friday, February 1, 2002, 3:00 - 4:00 P.M. Pacific time (23:00 - 24:00

    > GMT)
    >
    > eek 23:00 GMT.... that's a seriously anti-social time... I'm a sad
    > *******...but not that sad!!!
    >
    >




  5. #5
    Yair Alan Griver [MSFT] Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    LOL... That ain't what I heard... <g>

    Sorry - couldn't resist.

    We'll be sure to post the transcript for people who can't attend live...

    yag

    "John Butler" <nospamjrbutler@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:3c59d886$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > "Yair Alan Griver [MSFT]" <yag@microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:3c59a9a1$1@10.1.10.29...
    > > Status Report - Jan. 31, 2002
    > > .NET Remoting
    > > Friday, February 1, 2002, 3:00 - 4:00 P.M. Pacific time (23:00 - 24:00

    > GMT)
    >
    > eek 23:00 GMT.... that's a seriously anti-social time... I'm a sad
    > *******...but not that sad!!!
    >
    >




  6. #6
    Yair Alan Griver [MSFT] Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    Yes and yes. Not all the questions will necessarily make it into the chats -
    but we do save those as ideas for future white papers also...

    Just post the questions here or email them to me directly - I'll make sure
    that they're handled...

    yag


    "Jay Glynn" <jlsglynn@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3c59f492$1@10.1.10.29...
    > 2 questions on the chats.
    >
    > Will there be transcripts available?
    > Can we supply questions beforehand in case we are not available for the
    > chat?
    >
    >
    >




  7. #7
    Ed Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002


    "Yair Alan Griver [MSFT]" <yag@microsoft.com> wrote:
    >Status Report - Jan. 31, 2002
    >
    >
    >
    >Executive Chat with Yuval Neeman: Enterprise Development
    >Wednesday, February 20, 2002, 3:00 - 4:00 P.M. Pacific time (23:00 - 24:00
    >GMT)
    >Visual Studio .NET Enterprise Architect Tools
    >Tuesday, April 2, 2002, 2:00 - 3:00 P.M. Pacific time (22:00 - 23:00 GMT)
    >Successfully building complex enterprise applications requires a solid
    >architecture and a common understanding of requirements across the
    >development team. The role of an architect is typically to help their
    >organizations build applications that scale, integrate with existing
    >systems, fulfill business requirements, and be maintainable over multiple
    >versions of the product. In this session, Keith Short, Software Architect
    >for enterprise features within Visual Studio will answer your questions
    >about the tools Visual Studio .NET Enterprise Architect provides for
    >architects to build enterprise applications in a systematic, repeatable

    and
    >predictable manner.
    >


    VB has to be taken into context of the entire Enterprise Architecture. Some
    developers are not concerned about how VB fits in with other products but
    anyone developing Enterprise Applications has to take into account databases,
    messaging, transactions, security, etc. And they also have to take into account
    how they move forward as new versions come out. To date, the entire process
    of moving from version to version with Microsoft products is an absolute
    nightmare. Trying to juggle W2K upgrades, Active Directory, SQL 2000, Office
    XP, security, Exchange, MDAC, etc. is on the verge of being impossible.
    Throw in SAP-specific upgrades and how one has to coordinate an SAP ugprade
    with upgrades to W2K and SQL 2000 is not trivial excercise.

    I was ecstatic when I read the reference architecture - Microsoft Systems
    Architecture: Internet Data Center. This is first time I've seen a document
    that prescribes a way of using Microsoft technologies to deliver an infrastructure
    that addresses a number of enterprise requirements. I'm hoping that Microsoft
    will continue with this process and provide references to a new baseline
    architecture as technology changes and make recommendations on how to go
    from base line 1 to base line 2. There are too many products, versions,
    dependencies, for a small to medium size enterprise (SME) to organize and
    implement. We need Microsoft to prescribe a path. We need Microsoft to
    test their baseline to make sure it adheres to industry best practices and
    to make sure that it works. We need Microsoft to prescribe a way to migrate
    from one version to another. SMEs need guideance. There are too many ways
    of putting all this technology together. I don't have the resources or the
    time to figure it out. I need my partner/vendor to prescribe a path.

    Ed


  8. #8
    Mike Mitchell Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    On 3 Feb 2002 10:41:54 -0800, "Ed" <ed_raffin@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Trying to juggle W2K upgrades, Active Directory, SQL 2000, Office
    >XP, security, Exchange, MDAC, etc. is on the verge of being impossible.
    >Throw in SAP-specific upgrades and how one has to coordinate an SAP ugprade
    >with upgrades to W2K and SQL 2000 is not trivial excercise.


    I can heartily agree with this. Microsoft appears to think that every
    organisation has an infrastructure as rich as they, with countless
    thousands of employees to do ordinary everyday maintenance. For most
    companies, developers are there to develop. They just don't have the
    time to keep up with all the upgrades, patches, Q articles, and so on.
    It is like a never-ending paper chase, and many of the runners are
    exhausted and dropping by the wayside.

    MM

  9. #9
    Dave Keighan Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    Hi Mike
    [...]
    > don't have the time to keep up with all the
    > upgrades, patches, Q articles, and so on. It
    > is like a never-ending paper chase, and many
    > of the runners are exhausted and dropping by
    > the wayside.

    Can't dispute this Mike. I've been just keeping my nose just out of the
    water from version to version and never do seem to get any further ahead
    but as a hobbyist (which IMO is part of the problem it's not all that
    significant.

    *** OT Comments ***
    IMO Enterprisers are now officially the target, it's been moving that
    way since early VB, they've been using the tool hard and were a big part
    of making it a contender by pushing MS and proving VB - I don't think it'd
    be what it is today without them. Too bad they PO'd so many of them in the
    process - which they seem to be trying to amend. Making VB 'the tool to
    use' has created some difficulties along the way.

    Broken code and learning curve aside (taking a global look) don't you
    think VB.Net is what it takes to make VB the tool that solves all (ok
    most) of the old gripes (beginners tool, toy, runtimes, yada-yada-yada)?
    Yes I do believe that it could have been done differently but I also think
    that doing it that way would have either left us out of the big picture
    completely or having to make the transition over several versions - with
    the same result. One way or the other MS tools will run on Net - the boss
    says so.

    I've always contended (before I got over the/my runtimes bellyache) that
    they could just add a translator that would move the VB code into
    whatever it takes to make standalone apps but I also know that if it was
    possible they'd have done by now - DUH! Probably why I'm still a hobbyist.

    It's their ball, you wanna play you gotta play their way. It makes you
    feel bad if you don't like the new game/rules but you get over it and
    things are fun again.

    --
    Dave Keighan
    VB Hobbyist - Versions DOS/3/5/6


  10. #10
    Mike Mitchell Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    On 3 Feb 2002 15:39:34 -0800, Dave Keighan <dkeighan@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    >It's their ball, you wanna play you gotta play their way.


    I don't want to play any longer. I am planning on a career change.
    Selling Linux!

    MM

  11. #11
    Phil Weber Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    > It is like a never-ending paper chase, and many of the
    > runners are exhausted and dropping by the wayside.


    Mike: Which means more demand and higher pay for the survivors. If just
    anyone could create professional-quality software, we'd be the equivalent of
    Wal-Mart employees, and would be paid accordingly.
    ---
    Phil Weber



  12. #12
    Mike Mitchell Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    On Mon, 4 Feb 2002 07:45:07 -0800, "Phil Weber"
    <pweber@nospam.fawcette.com> wrote:

    > > It is like a never-ending paper chase, and many of the
    > > runners are exhausted and dropping by the wayside.

    >
    >Mike: Which means more demand and higher pay for the survivors.


    And they don't get to see their kids. And they put in 60 hours or more
    a week. And they're continually stressed out. And they die of heart
    attacks.

    Sure, greed works for some people.

    MM

  13. #13
    Phil Weber Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    > And they don't get to see their kids. And they put in 60
    > hours or more a week. And they're continually stressed
    > out. And they die of heart attacks. Sure, greed works
    > for some people.


    Mike: You assume that I'm greedy because I want to receive a higher hourly
    rate? In fact, I want to be able to work as few hours as necessary so that I
    have more time available for more important things. If I received Wal-Mart
    wages I'd have to work 60-hour weeks; the higher my hourly rate, the fewer
    hours I have to work. If that's greed, than I guess I'm guilty.
    ---
    Phil Weber



  14. #14
    Yair Alan Griver [MSFT] Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002

    Thanks for your feedback. I'm gonna make sure this gets around...

    yag

    "Ed" <ed_raffin@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:3c5d8472$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > "Yair Alan Griver [MSFT]" <yag@microsoft.com> wrote:
    > >Status Report - Jan. 31, 2002
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >Executive Chat with Yuval Neeman: Enterprise Development
    > >Wednesday, February 20, 2002, 3:00 - 4:00 P.M. Pacific time (23:00 -

    24:00
    > >GMT)
    > >Visual Studio .NET Enterprise Architect Tools
    > >Tuesday, April 2, 2002, 2:00 - 3:00 P.M. Pacific time (22:00 - 23:00 GMT)
    > >Successfully building complex enterprise applications requires a solid
    > >architecture and a common understanding of requirements across the
    > >development team. The role of an architect is typically to help their
    > >organizations build applications that scale, integrate with existing
    > >systems, fulfill business requirements, and be maintainable over multiple
    > >versions of the product. In this session, Keith Short, Software Architect
    > >for enterprise features within Visual Studio will answer your questions
    > >about the tools Visual Studio .NET Enterprise Architect provides for
    > >architects to build enterprise applications in a systematic, repeatable

    > and
    > >predictable manner.
    > >

    >
    > VB has to be taken into context of the entire Enterprise Architecture.

    Some
    > developers are not concerned about how VB fits in with other products but
    > anyone developing Enterprise Applications has to take into account

    databases,
    > messaging, transactions, security, etc. And they also have to take into

    account
    > how they move forward as new versions come out. To date, the entire

    process
    > of moving from version to version with Microsoft products is an absolute
    > nightmare. Trying to juggle W2K upgrades, Active Directory, SQL 2000,

    Office
    > XP, security, Exchange, MDAC, etc. is on the verge of being impossible.
    > Throw in SAP-specific upgrades and how one has to coordinate an SAP

    ugprade
    > with upgrades to W2K and SQL 2000 is not trivial excercise.
    >
    > I was ecstatic when I read the reference architecture - Microsoft Systems
    > Architecture: Internet Data Center. This is first time I've seen a

    document
    > that prescribes a way of using Microsoft technologies to deliver an

    infrastructure
    > that addresses a number of enterprise requirements. I'm hoping that

    Microsoft
    > will continue with this process and provide references to a new baseline
    > architecture as technology changes and make recommendations on how to go
    > from base line 1 to base line 2. There are too many products, versions,
    > dependencies, for a small to medium size enterprise (SME) to organize and
    > implement. We need Microsoft to prescribe a path. We need Microsoft to
    > test their baseline to make sure it adheres to industry best practices and
    > to make sure that it works. We need Microsoft to prescribe a way to

    migrate
    > from one version to another. SMEs need guideance. There are too many ways
    > of putting all this technology together. I don't have the resources or

    the
    > time to figure it out. I need my partner/vendor to prescribe a path.
    >
    > Ed
    >




  15. #15
    Patrick Troughton Guest

    Re: Yag's status report - Jan 31, 2002


    What stress? Learning is fun. I'm still writing in both VB6 and VB.NET and
    I can tell you that I enjoy VB.NET more than VB6. Visual inheritance, for
    example, is awesome. It make you wonder how you ever got along without it....

    /Pat

    kylix_is@yahoo.co.uk (Mike Mitchell) wrote:
    >On Mon, 4 Feb 2002 07:45:07 -0800, "Phil Weber"
    ><pweber@nospam.fawcette.com> wrote:
    >
    >> > It is like a never-ending paper chase, and many of the
    >> > runners are exhausted and dropping by the wayside.

    >>
    >>Mike: Which means more demand and higher pay for the survivors.

    >
    >And they don't get to see their kids. And they put in 60 hours or more
    >a week. And they're continually stressed out. And they die of heart
    >attacks.
    >
    >Sure, greed works for some people.
    >
    >MM



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