.NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware


DevX Home    Today's Headlines   Articles Archive   Tip Bank   Forums   

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: .NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware

  1. #1
    Mark Jerde Guest

    .NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware

    I know .NET won't run on Win95 computers. Other than that, how
    will .NET be for creating "standard desktop applications"?

    This is an honest question, not a troll for another
    .NET / .NOT / Delphi
    argument.

    -- Mark



  2. #2
    Phil Weber Guest

    Re: .NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware

    > I know .NET won't run on Win95 computers. Other than that,
    > how will .NET be for creating "standard desktop applications?"


    Mark: If...

    - You don't object to distributing a 17MB runtime with
    your app; and,
    - Your app doesn't employ any top-secret algorithms; and,
    - You don't need to support Windows 95 systems,

    ....then .NET is great for standard desktop applications. It will be even
    better within a couple of years, when (hopefully) the runtime will have
    become ubiquitous, and there will be fewer Win95 systems out there.
    ---
    Phil Weber



  3. #3
    Miha Markic Guest

    Re: .NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware

    Hi Phil

    > - Your app doesn't employ any top-secret algorithms; and,


    Bah, reverse engineering can be done on everything when it comes to
    programs.

    --
    Miha



  4. #4
    Mark Hurd Guest

    Re: .NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware

    "Miha Markic" <miham@spam=no.spin.com> wrote in message
    news:3c39c04c@147.208.176.211...
    > Hi Phil
    >
    > > - Your app doesn't employ any top-secret algorithms; and,

    >
    > Bah, reverse engineering can be done on everything when it comes to
    > programs.


    But with .NET, at the moment, it is not based on heuristics and rules of
    thumb -- you can extract the original source code (without local variable
    names and comments).

    That is one big step from manually attempting to understand a spaghetti of
    assembly code.

    >
    > --
    > Miha


    Regards,
    Mark Hurd, B.Sc.(Ma.) (Hons.)



  5. #5
    Shane Guest

    Re: .NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware


    I remember a few years ago working on a VB app.. and losing my hard drive
    with all the source code.. luckily a friend of mine had a copy of the EXE
    and decompiled it for me.. sure things were a bit weird and I had alot of
    fixing to do but it sure wasn't no assembly...

    We've had this problem before.. Java has it too.. really if you've got some
    super secret stuff.. do it in C++ (is Managed C++ decompilable?)

    "Mark Hurd" <markhurd@ozemail.com.au> wrote:
    >"Miha Markic" <miham@spam=no.spin.com> wrote in message
    >news:3c39c04c@147.208.176.211...
    >> Hi Phil
    >>
    >> > - Your app doesn't employ any top-secret algorithms; and,

    >>
    >> Bah, reverse engineering can be done on everything when it comes to
    >> programs.

    >
    >But with .NET, at the moment, it is not based on heuristics and rules of
    >thumb -- you can extract the original source code (without local variable
    >names and comments).
    >
    >That is one big step from manually attempting to understand a spaghetti

    of
    >assembly code.
    >
    >>
    >> --
    >> Miha

    >
    >Regards,
    >Mark Hurd, B.Sc.(Ma.) (Hons.)
    >
    >



  6. #6
    Miha Markic Guest

    Re: .NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware

    But still, it can be more or less decompiled.
    If it is secret stuff, do you think that is hard to hire a guy who knows
    decompilers?

    --
    Miha Markic

    > We've had this problem before.. Java has it too.. really if you've got

    some
    > super secret stuff.. do it in C++ (is Managed C++ decompilable?)





  7. #7
    Rob Teixeira Guest

    Re: .NET For Standalone PCs / Shareware



    Funny how the same threads keep coming up over and over...

    "Shane" <shane@nmasters.com> wrote:
    >
    >I remember a few years ago working on a VB app.. and losing my hard drive
    >with all the source code.. luckily a friend of mine had a copy of the EXE
    >and decompiled it for me.. sure things were a bit weird and I had alot of
    >fixing to do but it sure wasn't no assembly...


    In less than 45 minutes, I was able to get a decompiler for every version
    of Visual Basic off the internet. I'm afraid you don't really have to even
    hire good hackers these days.

    >We've had this problem before..


    Some versions of VB even saved the comments in the code

    >Java has it too..


    Still does

    >really if you've got some
    >super secret stuff.. do it in C++


    Even that won't help. If someone wants your code badly enough, they'll get
    it.

    >(is Managed C++ decompilable?)


    Yes.
    You'd be hard-pressed to find a language that isn't.

    -Rob

    >"Mark Hurd" <markhurd@ozemail.com.au> wrote:
    >>"Miha Markic" <miham@spam=no.spin.com> wrote in message
    >>news:3c39c04c@147.208.176.211...
    >>> Hi Phil
    >>>
    >>> > - Your app doesn't employ any top-secret algorithms; and,
    >>>
    >>> Bah, reverse engineering can be done on everything when it comes to
    >>> programs.

    >>
    >>But with .NET, at the moment, it is not based on heuristics and rules of
    >>thumb -- you can extract the original source code (without local variable
    >>names and comments).
    >>
    >>That is one big step from manually attempting to understand a spaghetti

    >of
    >>assembly code.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Miha

    >>
    >>Regards,
    >>Mark Hurd, B.Sc.(Ma.) (Hons.)
    >>
    >>

    >



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
HTML5 Development Center
 
 
FAQ
Latest Articles
Java
.NET
XML
Database
Enterprise
Questions? Contact us.
C++
Web Development
Wireless
Latest Tips
Open Source


   Development Centers

   -- Android Development Center
   -- Cloud Development Project Center
   -- HTML5 Development Center
   -- Windows Mobile Development Center