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Thread: App

  1. #1
    Jeff Pipes Guest

    App


    I'm a VB programmer doing VBA (Excel) for the first time and I noticed there
    is no App object. VB has a App object that lets you access the program's
    name, path, version number, EXEName, etc. Is their an equivelent to this
    in VBA? If not, how do I get the app's path, version number, etc.?

    - Jeff

  2. #2
    Douglas J. Steele Guest

    Re: App

    You've got a whole new object model to learn (and it's different for each
    application that uses VBA)!

    In Excel, Application.ThisWorkbook.Path will give you the path to the XLS,
    Application.ThisWorkbook.Name will give you the name of the file,
    Application.Path will give you the path to excel.exe, and
    Application.Version will give you the version of excel.exe.

    Go into the Microsoft Excel Visual Basic help file, and search for
    "Microsoft Excel Objects". That'll show you the entire object model. Click
    on any of the boxes, and learn about the object, its properties and so on.

    HTH

    --

    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    Beer, Wine and Database Programming. What could be better?
    Visit "Doug Steele's Beer and Programming Emporium"
    http://I.Am/DougSteele/


    "Jeff Pipes" <JeffP622@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:3a7b15f1$1@news.devx.com...
    >
    > I'm a VB programmer doing VBA (Excel) for the first time and I noticed

    there
    > is no App object. VB has a App object that lets you access the program's
    > name, path, version number, EXEName, etc. Is their an equivelent to this
    > in VBA? If not, how do I get the app's path, version number, etc.?
    >
    > - Jeff




  3. #3
    Jeff Pipes Guest

    Re: App


    So I take it that each application (Excel, Access, Word...) will have its
    own object model? ****, I'm rewriting some code originally written for VB
    and I want it to be VBA compatible. If each application has its own unique
    way of representing the equivelent to the App object, then apparently this
    is impossible to do. I suppose the best thing I can do is to hard code support
    for the most common applications which use VBA.

    - Jeff

    "Douglas J. Steele" <djsteele@idirect.com> wrote:
    >You've got a whole new object model to learn (and it's different for each
    >application that uses VBA)!
    >
    >In Excel, Application.ThisWorkbook.Path will give you the path to the XLS,
    >Application.ThisWorkbook.Name will give you the name of the file,
    >Application.Path will give you the path to excel.exe, and
    >Application.Version will give you the version of excel.exe.
    >
    >Go into the Microsoft Excel Visual Basic help file, and search for
    >"Microsoft Excel Objects". That'll show you the entire object model. Click
    >on any of the boxes, and learn about the object, its properties and so on.
    >
    >HTH
    >
    >--
    >
    >Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    >Beer, Wine and Database Programming. What could be better?
    >Visit "Doug Steele's Beer and Programming Emporium"
    >http://I.Am/DougSteele/
    >
    >
    >"Jeff Pipes" <JeffP622@msn.com> wrote in message
    >news:3a7b15f1$1@news.devx.com...
    >>
    >> I'm a VB programmer doing VBA (Excel) for the first time and I noticed

    >there
    >> is no App object. VB has a App object that lets you access the program's
    >> name, path, version number, EXEName, etc. Is their an equivelent to this
    >> in VBA? If not, how do I get the app's path, version number, etc.?
    >>
    >> - Jeff

    >
    >



  4. #4
    Paul Clement Guest

    Re: App

    On 5 Feb 2001 06:25:54 -0800, "Jeff Pipes" <JeffP622@msn.com> wrote:


    So I take it that each application (Excel, Access, Word...) will have its
    own object model? ****, I'm rewriting some code originally written for VB
    and I want it to be VBA compatible. If each application has its own unique
    way of representing the equivelent to the App object, then apparently this
    is impossible to do. I suppose the best thing I can do is to hard code support
    for the most common applications which use VBA.

    Or you can take your VB code and write a single Active DLL or EXE that will do this for each Office
    application you develop.


    Paul ~~~ pclement@ameritech.net
    Microsoft MVP (Visual Basic)

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