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Thread: Programming in C++ or another language?

  1. #1
    kromix Guest

    Programming in C++ or another language?


    Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to invision myself
    learning many programming languages and doing well in college and plan to
    have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.

    I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc.... I know
    as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are on my
    head.


    Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these languages?

  2. #2
    Mark C Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?


    By all means start with "C"!

    It gives you a good underlying understanding of everything you need to know
    to program in any language...

    Logic
    Variable types - declaration, usage, int, char, char *, float, double, ...
    Control structures - for/next, do/while, ...
    Conditional structures - if/then, switch/case, ...
    Functions - passing parameters, and return values
    Structures
    Arrays
    Pointers
    and much, much, more...

    Also, don't just take a first level "C" course and expect to get it all.
    Most first level "C" courses just touch the surface of the power of "C".
    Once you are able to take and do well in an advanced "C" course, depending
    on your aptitude, you should be able to write programs in any language.
    The only difficulty you will have is the difference in syntax!

    I've seen a slew of so-called programmers (VB programmers that is...) that
    don't know squat about what goes on behind the scenes, because they just
    wanted to jump in and code, and were too lazy to complete some "C" courses.
    Their code looks horrible!

    Good Luck!

    "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote:
    >
    >Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to invision

    myself
    >learning many programming languages and doing well in college and plan to
    >have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    >
    >I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc.... I know
    >as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are on my
    >head.
    >
    >
    >Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these languages?



  3. #3
    kromix Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?


    Thanks for the Info Mark C, by the way, if i were to start with C, what would
    I start with? Do i visit a Book store and pick up a copy of "C For Dummies"
    ( Example ) or what?

  4. #4
    Danny Kalev Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?

    I agree. Although C is not an ideal language for teaching purposes, it's
    the basis for everything. From C you can advance to C++. Secondly, C is
    a real programming language with all the features that other languages
    try to gloss or make do without, e.g., pointers, bitwise operators,
    function pointers, memory management and so on. After mastering it,
    learning any other language is a piece of cake.

    How long does it take? It's really hard to answer that. It depends on
    your motivation, skills and the pressure your employer exerts on you to
    start writing in that language:) since you're at school, the latter
    doesn't apply to you I guess... You can start writing reasonable program
    within a couple of months. Becoming a serious programmer takes longer,
    I'd say 6-12 months.

    Danny

    Mark C wrote:
    >
    > By all means start with "C"!
    >
    > It gives you a good underlying understanding of everything you need to know
    > to program in any language...
    >
    > Logic
    > Variable types - declaration, usage, int, char, char *, float, double, ...
    > Control structures - for/next, do/while, ...
    > Conditional structures - if/then, switch/case, ...
    > Functions - passing parameters, and return values
    > Structures
    > Arrays
    > Pointers
    > and much, much, more...
    >
    > Also, don't just take a first level "C" course and expect to get it all.
    > Most first level "C" courses just touch the surface of the power of "C".
    > Once you are able to take and do well in an advanced "C" course, depending
    > on your aptitude, you should be able to write programs in any language.
    > The only difficulty you will have is the difference in syntax!
    >
    > I've seen a slew of so-called programmers (VB programmers that is...) that
    > don't know squat about what goes on behind the scenes, because they just
    > wanted to jump in and code, and were too lazy to complete some "C" courses.
    > Their code looks horrible!
    >
    > Good Luck!
    >
    > "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to invision

    > myself
    > >learning many programming languages and doing well in college and plan to
    > >have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    > >
    > >I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc.... I know
    > >as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are on my
    > >head.
    > >
    > >
    > >Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these languages?


  5. #5
    Danny Kalev Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?



    kromix wrote:
    >
    > Thanks for the Info Mark C, by the way, if i were to start with C, what would
    > I start with? Do i visit a Book store and pick up a copy of "C For Dummies"
    > ( Example ) or what?

    Never! start with the best book, always. In this case it's "The C
    programming Language" by Kernighan and Ritchie. It's a tad terse and
    perhaps hard to digest on the first read but in time you'll learn to
    appreciate this book immensely.

    Danny

  6. #6
    James Curran Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?

    OK, I'll take the counterpoint. Do NOT attempt C first. There is very
    little non-C++ C coding going on these day, and that's mostly legacy
    systems. But the main problem with learning C first is that you waste a
    lot of time learning to do things that C++ & Java both make irrelevant.
    Like using arrays of tiny integers as strings. Like malloc & free. Like
    creating a linked lists manually. Like 90% of a everything dealing with
    pointers.

    I'd suggest learning C++ first, but with a book that focuses on being a
    class-user first, and a class-writer later. i.e., it's sort of like
    learning C first, but assumes things that "string" and "list<>" are native
    types. I'm sure such books exist, but I don't know any titles off-hand.


    --
    Truth,
    James Curran [MVP]
    www.NJTheater.com (Professional)
    www.NovelTheory.com (Personal)
    MVP = Where your high-priced consultant goes for free answers



    "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote in message
    news:3cf6d4e4$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to invision

    myself
    > learning many programming languages and doing well in college and plan to
    > have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    >
    > I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc.... I

    know
    > as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are on my
    > head.
    >
    >
    > Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these

    languages?



  7. #7
    marilyn Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?

    I would agree with James Curran's message - Kernighan and Ritchie wrote
    an excellent book 'for that time' which was the 70s. Today - start with C++
    classes and object-oriented code, then drill down into C-style code. (C++
    is a superset of C and includes all of C).

    Not really aware of any good books for introductory level - later get
    Lippman & Lajoie's C++ Primer, Stroustrop's C++ book, and Scott Meyer's
    books on effective C++.

    "Mark C" <mdcashion@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3cf6d843$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > By all means start with "C"!
    >
    > It gives you a good underlying understanding of everything you need to

    know
    > to program in any language...
    >
    > Logic
    > Variable types - declaration, usage, int, char, char *, float, double, ...
    > Control structures - for/next, do/while, ...
    > Conditional structures - if/then, switch/case, ...
    > Functions - passing parameters, and return values
    > Structures
    > Arrays
    > Pointers
    > and much, much, more...
    >
    > Also, don't just take a first level "C" course and expect to get it all.
    > Most first level "C" courses just touch the surface of the power of "C".
    > Once you are able to take and do well in an advanced "C" course, depending
    > on your aptitude, you should be able to write programs in any language.
    > The only difficulty you will have is the difference in syntax!
    >
    > I've seen a slew of so-called programmers (VB programmers that is...) that
    > don't know squat about what goes on behind the scenes, because they just
    > wanted to jump in and code, and were too lazy to complete some "C"

    courses.
    > Their code looks horrible!
    >
    > Good Luck!
    >
    > "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to invision

    > myself
    > >learning many programming languages and doing well in college and plan to
    > >have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    > >
    > >I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc.... I

    know
    > >as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are on my
    > >head.
    > >
    > >
    > >Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these

    languages?
    >




  8. #8
    Danny Kalev Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?

    Ideally, one should start with C++ except that eventually, C and its
    heritage are inevitable. For example, "using arrays of tiny integers as
    strings" is a must when dealing with fstream. To open a file, you must
    pass its name as a C string to the constructor or the open() member
    function of an fstream object. Pointers, as daunting as they are, are
    still necessary in C++ and so are plain structs. So IMO, it might be a
    good idea to learn the low level interface of C and then move on to C++
    (and thus appreciate it more). I know that Stroustrup and many other
    luminaries recommend learning C++ right from the start but the problem
    is that one way or another, the C heritage keeps haunting us:)

    Danny

    James Curran wrote:
    >
    > OK, I'll take the counterpoint. Do NOT attempt C first. There is very
    > little non-C++ C coding going on these day, and that's mostly legacy
    > systems. But the main problem with learning C first is that you waste a
    > lot of time learning to do things that C++ & Java both make irrelevant.
    > Like using arrays of tiny integers as strings. Like malloc & free. Like
    > creating a linked lists manually. Like 90% of a everything dealing with
    > pointers.
    >
    > I'd suggest learning C++ first, but with a book that focuses on being a
    > class-user first, and a class-writer later. i.e., it's sort of like
    > learning C first, but assumes things that "string" and "list<>" are native
    > types. I'm sure such books exist, but I don't know any titles off-hand.
    >
    > --
    > Truth,
    > James Curran [MVP]
    > www.NJTheater.com (Professional)
    > www.NovelTheory.com (Personal)
    > MVP = Where your high-priced consultant goes for free answers
    >
    > "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote in message
    > news:3cf6d4e4$1@10.1.10.29...
    > >
    > > Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to invision

    > myself
    > > learning many programming languages and doing well in college and plan to
    > > have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    > >
    > > I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc.... I

    > know
    > > as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are on my
    > > head.
    > >
    > >
    > > Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these

    > languages?


  9. #9
    marilyn Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?

    Hi, Danny. I really feel it is easier to start with C++ and "drill
    down" into all the C details once you're comfortable
    with the C++ rather than to start with C and try to work that up into
    object-oriented C++ (even though most of us
    had to do it that way because that's the order it happened).

    Marilyn


    "Danny Kalev" <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote in message
    news:3CFC8F30.564628E7@inter.net.il...
    > Ideally, one should start with C++ except that eventually, C and its
    > heritage are inevitable. For example, "using arrays of tiny integers as
    > strings" is a must when dealing with fstream. To open a file, you must
    > pass its name as a C string to the constructor or the open() member
    > function of an fstream object. Pointers, as daunting as they are, are
    > still necessary in C++ and so are plain structs. So IMO, it might be a
    > good idea to learn the low level interface of C and then move on to C++
    > (and thus appreciate it more). I know that Stroustrup and many other
    > luminaries recommend learning C++ right from the start but the problem
    > is that one way or another, the C heritage keeps haunting us:)
    >
    > Danny
    >
    > James Curran wrote:
    > >
    > > OK, I'll take the counterpoint. Do NOT attempt C first. There is

    very
    > > little non-C++ C coding going on these day, and that's mostly legacy
    > > systems. But the main problem with learning C first is that you waste

    a
    > > lot of time learning to do things that C++ & Java both make irrelevant.
    > > Like using arrays of tiny integers as strings. Like malloc & free.

    Like
    > > creating a linked lists manually. Like 90% of a everything dealing with
    > > pointers.
    > >
    > > I'd suggest learning C++ first, but with a book that focuses on

    being a
    > > class-user first, and a class-writer later. i.e., it's sort of like
    > > learning C first, but assumes things that "string" and "list<>" are

    native
    > > types. I'm sure such books exist, but I don't know any titles off-hand.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Truth,
    > > James Curran [MVP]
    > > www.NJTheater.com (Professional)
    > > www.NovelTheory.com (Personal)
    > > MVP = Where your high-priced consultant goes for free answers
    > >
    > > "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote in message
    > > news:3cf6d4e4$1@10.1.10.29...
    > > >
    > > > Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to

    invision
    > > myself
    > > > learning many programming languages and doing well in college and plan

    to
    > > > have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    > > >
    > > > I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc.... I

    > > know
    > > > as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are on

    my
    > > > head.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these

    > > languages?




  10. #10
    Danny Kalev Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?

    To be honest, I'm not sure that switching from the high-level
    abstractions of C++, say string and vector to the low level features of
    C would be that easy. Indeed, like most of us I started with C and then
    switched to C++ but this isn't just a question of what's easier. The
    problem is that one way or another, C concepts will haunt you even in
    state of the art C++ code so you'd better be prepared (or at least
    become familiar with them). How many high level programmers would
    willingly switch back to assembly? Moving from C++ to C, at least in my
    opinion, is psychologically more difficult. Once you know there's an
    easier, safer and cleaner way to do things, how can you rationalize the
    need to implement them the hard way?

    Danny

    marilyn wrote:
    >
    > Hi, Danny. I really feel it is easier to start with C++ and "drill
    > down" into all the C details once you're comfortable
    > with the C++ rather than to start with C and try to work that up into
    > object-oriented C++ (even though most of us
    > had to do it that way because that's the order it happened).
    >
    > Marilyn
    >
    > "Danny Kalev" <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote in message
    > news:3CFC8F30.564628E7@inter.net.il...
    > > Ideally, one should start with C++ except that eventually, C and its
    > > heritage are inevitable. For example, "using arrays of tiny integers as
    > > strings" is a must when dealing with fstream. To open a file, you must
    > > pass its name as a C string to the constructor or the open() member
    > > function of an fstream object. Pointers, as daunting as they are, are
    > > still necessary in C++ and so are plain structs. So IMO, it might be a
    > > good idea to learn the low level interface of C and then move on to C++
    > > (and thus appreciate it more). I know that Stroustrup and many other
    > > luminaries recommend learning C++ right from the start but the problem
    > > is that one way or another, the C heritage keeps haunting us:)
    > >
    > > Danny
    > >
    > > James Curran wrote:
    > > >
    > > > OK, I'll take the counterpoint. Do NOT attempt C first. There is

    > very
    > > > little non-C++ C coding going on these day, and that's mostly legacy
    > > > systems. But the main problem with learning C first is that you waste

    > a
    > > > lot of time learning to do things that C++ & Java both make irrelevant.
    > > > Like using arrays of tiny integers as strings. Like malloc & free.

    > Like
    > > > creating a linked lists manually. Like 90% of a everything dealing with
    > > > pointers.
    > > >
    > > > I'd suggest learning C++ first, but with a book that focuses on

    > being a
    > > > class-user first, and a class-writer later. i.e., it's sort of like
    > > > learning C first, but assumes things that "string" and "list<>" are

    > native
    > > > types. I'm sure such books exist, but I don't know any titles off-hand.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Truth,
    > > > James Curran [MVP]
    > > > www.NJTheater.com (Professional)
    > > > www.NovelTheory.com (Personal)
    > > > MVP = Where your high-priced consultant goes for free answers
    > > >
    > > > "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:3cf6d4e4$1@10.1.10.29...
    > > > >
    > > > > Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to

    > invision
    > > > myself
    > > > > learning many programming languages and doing well in college and plan

    > to
    > > > > have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    > > > >
    > > > > I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc.... I
    > > > know
    > > > > as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are on

    > my
    > > > > head.
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these
    > > > languages?


  11. #11
    Mark C Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?


    Hooray! I agree with Danny whole-heartedly!

    I had to chime in on this one more time.

    It just isn't logical to start with C++ and then learn C!

    Let's see...
    First day of C++ class...
    Open your text book...
    Page 1...

    Q: What is C++?
    A: Object Oriented "C".

    Yuk! :(

    Danny Kalev <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote:
    >To be honest, I'm not sure that switching from the high-level
    >abstractions of C++, say string and vector to the low level features of
    >C would be that easy. Indeed, like most of us I started with C and then
    >switched to C++ but this isn't just a question of what's easier. The
    >problem is that one way or another, C concepts will haunt you even in
    >state of the art C++ code so you'd better be prepared (or at least
    >become familiar with them). How many high level programmers would
    >willingly switch back to assembly? Moving from C++ to C, at least in my
    >opinion, is psychologically more difficult. Once you know there's an
    >easier, safer and cleaner way to do things, how can you rationalize the
    >need to implement them the hard way?
    >
    >Danny
    >
    >marilyn wrote:
    >>
    >> Hi, Danny. I really feel it is easier to start with C++ and "drill
    >> down" into all the C details once you're comfortable
    >> with the C++ rather than to start with C and try to work that up into
    >> object-oriented C++ (even though most of us
    >> had to do it that way because that's the order it happened).
    >>
    >> Marilyn
    >>
    >> "Danny Kalev" <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote in message
    >> news:3CFC8F30.564628E7@inter.net.il...
    >> > Ideally, one should start with C++ except that eventually, C and its
    >> > heritage are inevitable. For example, "using arrays of tiny integers

    as
    >> > strings" is a must when dealing with fstream. To open a file, you must
    >> > pass its name as a C string to the constructor or the open() member
    >> > function of an fstream object. Pointers, as daunting as they are, are
    >> > still necessary in C++ and so are plain structs. So IMO, it might be

    a
    >> > good idea to learn the low level interface of C and then move on to

    C++
    >> > (and thus appreciate it more). I know that Stroustrup and many other
    >> > luminaries recommend learning C++ right from the start but the problem
    >> > is that one way or another, the C heritage keeps haunting us:)
    >> >
    >> > Danny
    >> >
    >> > James Curran wrote:
    >> > >
    >> > > OK, I'll take the counterpoint. Do NOT attempt C first. There

    is
    >> very
    >> > > little non-C++ C coding going on these day, and that's mostly legacy
    >> > > systems. But the main problem with learning C first is that you

    waste
    >> a
    >> > > lot of time learning to do things that C++ & Java both make irrelevant.
    >> > > Like using arrays of tiny integers as strings. Like malloc & free.

    >> Like
    >> > > creating a linked lists manually. Like 90% of a everything dealing

    with
    >> > > pointers.
    >> > >
    >> > > I'd suggest learning C++ first, but with a book that focuses on

    >> being a
    >> > > class-user first, and a class-writer later. i.e., it's sort of like
    >> > > learning C first, but assumes things that "string" and "list<>" are

    >> native
    >> > > types. I'm sure such books exist, but I don't know any titles off-hand.
    >> > >
    >> > > --
    >> > > Truth,
    >> > > James Curran [MVP]
    >> > > www.NJTheater.com (Professional)
    >> > > www.NovelTheory.com (Personal)
    >> > > MVP = Where your high-priced consultant goes for free answers
    >> > >
    >> > > "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote in message
    >> > > news:3cf6d4e4$1@10.1.10.29...
    >> > > >
    >> > > > Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to

    >> invision
    >> > > myself
    >> > > > learning many programming languages and doing well in college and

    plan
    >> to
    >> > > > have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    >> > > >
    >> > > > I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA, etc....

    I
    >> > > know
    >> > > > as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs are

    on
    >> my
    >> > > > head.
    >> > > >
    >> > > >
    >> > > > Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand these
    >> > > languages?



  12. #12
    marilyn Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?

    You got the wrong text. I teach programming and we switched to C++
    drilling down into C and it is much easier and the students learn it faster
    than when we taught C first and then tried to take them into C++. So, in my
    experience with about 200 programmers - C++ first works way better than C
    first. I agree with Bjarne.
    Marilyn

    "Mark C" <mdcashion@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3cfe9fba$1@10.1.10.29...
    >
    > Hooray! I agree with Danny whole-heartedly!
    >
    > I had to chime in on this one more time.
    >
    > It just isn't logical to start with C++ and then learn C!
    >
    > Let's see...
    > First day of C++ class...
    > Open your text book...
    > Page 1...
    >
    > Q: What is C++?
    > A: Object Oriented "C".
    >
    > Yuk! :(
    >
    > Danny Kalev <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote:
    > >To be honest, I'm not sure that switching from the high-level
    > >abstractions of C++, say string and vector to the low level features of
    > >C would be that easy. Indeed, like most of us I started with C and then
    > >switched to C++ but this isn't just a question of what's easier. The
    > >problem is that one way or another, C concepts will haunt you even in
    > >state of the art C++ code so you'd better be prepared (or at least
    > >become familiar with them). How many high level programmers would
    > >willingly switch back to assembly? Moving from C++ to C, at least in my
    > >opinion, is psychologically more difficult. Once you know there's an
    > >easier, safer and cleaner way to do things, how can you rationalize the
    > >need to implement them the hard way?
    > >
    > >Danny
    > >
    > >marilyn wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Hi, Danny. I really feel it is easier to start with C++ and "drill
    > >> down" into all the C details once you're comfortable
    > >> with the C++ rather than to start with C and try to work that up into
    > >> object-oriented C++ (even though most of us
    > >> had to do it that way because that's the order it happened).
    > >>
    > >> Marilyn
    > >>
    > >> "Danny Kalev" <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote in message
    > >> news:3CFC8F30.564628E7@inter.net.il...
    > >> > Ideally, one should start with C++ except that eventually, C and its
    > >> > heritage are inevitable. For example, "using arrays of tiny integers

    > as
    > >> > strings" is a must when dealing with fstream. To open a file, you

    must
    > >> > pass its name as a C string to the constructor or the open() member
    > >> > function of an fstream object. Pointers, as daunting as they are, are
    > >> > still necessary in C++ and so are plain structs. So IMO, it might be

    > a
    > >> > good idea to learn the low level interface of C and then move on to

    > C++
    > >> > (and thus appreciate it more). I know that Stroustrup and many other
    > >> > luminaries recommend learning C++ right from the start but the

    problem
    > >> > is that one way or another, the C heritage keeps haunting us:)
    > >> >
    > >> > Danny
    > >> >
    > >> > James Curran wrote:
    > >> > >
    > >> > > OK, I'll take the counterpoint. Do NOT attempt C first. There

    > is
    > >> very
    > >> > > little non-C++ C coding going on these day, and that's mostly

    legacy
    > >> > > systems. But the main problem with learning C first is that you

    > waste
    > >> a
    > >> > > lot of time learning to do things that C++ & Java both make

    irrelevant.
    > >> > > Like using arrays of tiny integers as strings. Like malloc & free.
    > >> Like
    > >> > > creating a linked lists manually. Like 90% of a everything dealing

    > with
    > >> > > pointers.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > I'd suggest learning C++ first, but with a book that focuses on
    > >> being a
    > >> > > class-user first, and a class-writer later. i.e., it's sort of

    like
    > >> > > learning C first, but assumes things that "string" and "list<>" are
    > >> native
    > >> > > types. I'm sure such books exist, but I don't know any titles

    off-hand.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > --
    > >> > > Truth,
    > >> > > James Curran [MVP]
    > >> > > www.NJTheater.com (Professional)
    > >> > > www.NovelTheory.com (Personal)
    > >> > > MVP = Where your high-priced consultant goes for free answers
    > >> > >
    > >> > > "kromix" <united@forcefront.com> wrote in message
    > >> > > news:3cf6d4e4$1@10.1.10.29...
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > Hello, I am a student still in high school but I would like to
    > >> invision
    > >> > > myself
    > >> > > > learning many programming languages and doing well in college and

    > plan
    > >> to
    > >> > > > have a nice future somewhere in the programming industry.
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > I was wondering, what should I begin with, VB, C, C++, JAVA,

    etc....
    > I
    > >> > > know
    > >> > > > as much about these languages as much as I know how many hairs

    are
    > on
    > >> my
    > >> > > > head.
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > Also, how long does it take to really "LEARN" and understand

    these
    > >> > > languages?

    >




  13. #13
    James Curran Guest

    Re: Programming in C++ or another language?

    "Mark C" <mdcashion@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3cfe9fba$1@10.1.10.29...
    > Let's see...
    > First day of C++ class...
    > Open your text book...
    > Page 1...
    >
    > Q: What is C++?
    > A: Object Oriented "C".


    Q2: What is "C"?
    A2: Algol-68 with a stripped down syntax.

    I agree with Marilyn -- Get a better text book.


    Comparison is the second day of class in various languages:

    Basic:
    A$="Hello"
    B$="World"
    C$=A$ + ", " + B$ + "!";
    PRINT C$

    C++
    std::string A = "Hello"
    std::string B = "World"
    std::string C = A + ", " + B + '!';
    cout << C;

    C
    char* A = "Hello";
    char* B = "World";
    char* C = malloc(strlen(A) + strlen(B) + 4)
    /* that's 4 = 2 for "comma-space",
    * 1 for the exclaim point
    * and 1 for the end-of-string NULL
    */
    if (C != NULL)
    {
    strcpy(C,A);
    strcat(C, ", ");
    strcat(C, B);
    strcat(C, "!");
    printf(C);
    free(C);
    }




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