DevX Home    Today's Headlines   Articles Archive   Tip Bank   Forums   

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Future of Microsoft Visual Studio Programmers/Developers/Engineers

  1. #1
    Muhammad Waqas Guest

    Future of Microsoft Visual Studio Programmers/Developers/Engineers


    Dear All

    I really need some career advice here. I am currently working as a senior
    Software Engineer. I have more than four year experience in IT industry.
    Iím proficient in Visual Basic (more than 2.5 years experience) and have
    strong command on RDBMS (Informix, MS Access and SQL Server).

    My colleagues those started work on Java one year back (their job title and
    pay scale were same at that time), now have more attractive opportunities
    and offers than I (other colleagues those have the same skill set) within
    company and all around the world.

    This situation making us frustrated and we are not enjoying with our work.
    We seriously are thinking to leave the job. Get certification of Sun Certified
    Programmer and again enter in IT industry with demanding look. There are
    no opportunities to learn Java even management doesnít like that its Visual
    Basic team members learn something else especially Java.

    I would like to ask what is the future of those programmers/developers/Engineers
    those are developing application using Microsoft Visual Studio (Visual Basic
    ASP/Com/DCom and Visual C)?

    What will be the future of .Net?
    How it is compatible with existing developers of Microsoft Visual Studio?
    Why we learn new language C#? Why not we migrate to Java?

    Kindly help us in these regards

    Muhammad Waqas






  2. #2
    Elena Guest

    Re: Future of Microsoft Visual Studio Programmers/Developers/Engineers


    Well, basically all people in this field are constantly trying to figure out
    what's going to be on top next year, the year after, and the year after that.
    After 20 years of this, I can tell you that probably 50% of all predictions
    are wrong. Welcome to IT. The COBOL language doesn't have much of a future
    now, but I can assure you back in the 70's people were saying it would disappear
    in 3-5 years. Guess they were a little off. There's a long list of worthy
    technologies that just didn't find their market, or never quite got the product
    support, or whose design was just a little off. Each one of them was heralded
    as "THE FUTURE OF IT".

    You kind of have to do your own research and make your best guess. I'm sure
    there will be lots of people that tell you with absolute certainty they know
    what is going to happen. Ask them for some stock tips while you're at it.
    What the heck, I'll make a few predictions myself.

    Most certainly Java has an excellent future - - well, for at least the next
    two years and I don't make predictions after that. (I don't work in Java,
    but in the city I live in, the Java consultants are thriving.) I make my
    living in the Microsoft camp at present and the dot-net products are the
    Empire's bid to Strike Back. I can't tell yet if it will work but there
    is a HUGE code base for the Visual Studio products (not quite as big as as
    COBOL, but pretty darned big) and those companies are going to be looking
    for a migration path that doesn't involve dumping all the software they've
    already developed. And Microsoft has some pretty deep pockets when it comes
    to development R&D so I think the chances are good that once dot-net comes
    out, the products will be good and the Microsoft will pull ahead and maybe
    Java will drop back.

    The dotnet products will NOT be adopted by everyone overnight. There looks
    to be some considerable migration effort involved and again, companies don't
    want to pay to redevelop software they just developed 2 years ago if they
    aren't absolutely forced to. I suspect the development in pre-dot-net products
    will go on for another year or two. Also, some of the best features of the
    dotnet stuff are dependant upon Windows 2000 operating systems and THAT migration
    is not happening overnight.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that these things are in a constant state
    of flux. No skill stays on top of the pay scale for long because of course
    more people enter that arena and the pay starts to fall off. Before Java
    was the big thing, there were these HUGE enterprise packages from companies
    like Bahn and SAP and those consultants were making absolutely INCREDIBLE
    money. But that wave has fallen and they aren't at the top of the heap anymore.
    So, you've got to pay attention to what the market is doing, but you can't
    fall apart every time things shift. If you're really upset about it, by all
    means switch to Java if you can. Your peace of mind is important too. But
    the day will come when Java slides off the top of the heap and some other
    technology is king.


  3. #3
    Brian Guest

    Re: Future of Microsoft Visual Studio Programmers/Developers/Engineers


    "Muhammad Waqas" <m_waqas@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >Dear All
    >
    >I really need some career advice here. I am currently working as a senior
    >Software Engineer. I have more than four year experience in IT industry.
    >Iím proficient in Visual Basic (more than 2.5 years experience) and have
    >strong command on RDBMS (Informix, MS Access and SQL Server).
    >
    >My colleagues those started work on Java one year back (their job title

    and
    >pay scale were same at that time), now have more attractive opportunities
    >and offers than I (other colleagues those have the same skill set) within
    >company and all around the world.
    >
    >This situation making us frustrated and we are not enjoying with our work.
    >We seriously are thinking to leave the job. Get certification of Sun Certified
    >Programmer and again enter in IT industry with demanding look. There are
    >no opportunities to learn Java even management doesnít like that its Visual
    >Basic team members learn something else especially Java.
    >
    >I would like to ask what is the future of those programmers/developers/Engineers
    >those are developing application using Microsoft Visual Studio (Visual Basic
    >ASP/Com/DCom and Visual C)?
    >
    >What will be the future of .Net?
    >How it is compatible with existing developers of Microsoft Visual Studio?
    >Why we learn new language C#? Why not we migrate to Java?
    >
    >Kindly help us in these regards
    >
    >Muhammad Waqas
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Microsoft will remain king. If you go with java you have to learn a ton
    of technologies that go along with it. Don't you remember how perl and cgi
    scripts were paying 100-120k 9 months ago but now those perl developers want
    to go to java because java has JSP and serveletts, the hot ticket today;
    it is taking the rug out from Perl. 9 months from now it will be something
    else which requires a ton of background knowledge to be proficient in. Microsoft
    programming will always pay a respectable wage. If you want to learn java
    you should be willing to migrate to C++ work which has a better chance of
    leading to java. A good java programmer in the long run will probably also
    know quite a bit about network protocols, hardware, etc. There is a good
    chance that being just a VB programmer that you will have ZERO common sense
    in those areas. By the time that you learn today's hot technology with Sun
    they will have replaced it. Sun changes far more quickly than Microsoft.

  4. #4
    David K. Guest

    Re: Future of Microsoft Visual Studio Programmers/Developers/Engineers


    Muhammad:

    "Muhammad Waqas" <m_waqas@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >There are
    >no opportunities to learn Java even management doesnít like that its Visual
    >Basic team members learn something else especially Java.
    >


    That's not a good sign. If management doesn't encounrage its people to learn
    and grow, then you have to wonder if that is the right place for you to work.

    >I would like to ask what is the future of those programmers/developers/Engineers
    >those are developing application using Microsoft Visual Studio (Visual Basic
    >ASP/Com/DCom and Visual C)?
    >


    The best answer that I can give you is, "who knows?". Nobody knows what
    the "hot" technology is going to be 5 years from now. It may be Java; it
    may be .NET; it may even be something nobody has even heard of today. Trying
    to figure out what skill is going to be "hot" is a fruitless task.

    Today, Java may seem like the ticket to riches, but tomorrow Java it could
    be a dead-end technology, especially with Microsoft looking to compete with
    it with its new .NET initiative.

    Personally, I don't think Java is going anywhere. There are a lot of people
    and companies who will do anything to avoid Microsoft, and Java is the most
    popular "non-Microsoft" platform right now. Learning Java definitely won't
    hurt.

    >What will be the future of .Net?


    Again, who knows. It is a big change from the current Microsoft development
    environment, and there are people who think that it will take some time for
    it to be adopted.

    >How it is compatible with existing developers of Microsoft Visual Studio?


    From what I've read, VB.NET is very different from VB6. C#, the new .NET
    language bears a large resemblance to Java. Visual C++ has a lot of new
    extensions for .NET, although it still has the old MFC and ATL class libraries.
    I haven't heard anything about a Visual Foxpro.NET.

    >Why we learn new language C#? Why not we migrate to Java?
    >


    That's a good question. I guess it depends on whether you are in the "anything-but-Microsoft"
    camp. If you are committed to Microsoft tools and technology, then C# is
    probably worth looking at. Also, since you have VB experience, you also
    should look at VB.NET. From what I've read, C# and VB.NET are give you very
    similar functionality. The main difference is syntactic.


  5. #5
    Jason Kaczor Guest

    Re: Future of Microsoft Visual Studio Programmers/Developers/Engineers


    "David K." <davidk@nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    >Personally, I don't think Java is going anywhere. There are a lot of
    >people and companies who will do anything to avoid Microsoft, and Java is


    >the most popular "non-Microsoft" platform right now. Learning Java
    >definitely won't hurt.


    Personally, I've heard rumblings that there will be some sort of Java on
    .NET, just not provided by Microsoft. Rational? HP? that open-source clean-room
    one that MS was funding for awhile? I dunno...

    >From what I've read, VB.NET is very different from VB6. C#, the new .NET
    >language bears a large resemblance to Java.


    My opinion, as that of a VB-guy who hates the syntax of C++, Java, C# is
    just to buckle down and learn C#.

    It gives me an excellent go-forward skill, that I can leverage into more
    Java later on.

    ****, the syntax of C#, Java and JavaScript are so similar, that skills and
    technology transfer should be very easy. For my current clients doing new
    ASP work that will eventually have to be moved to .NET, I'm telling them
    to script "server-side" in JavaScript, wrap common objects in JS interfaces
    that can be replaced internally with .NET interfaces at a future point.
    It will change the least.

    >If you are committed to Microsoft tools and technology, then C# is
    >probably worth looking at.


    Correct. Most first code samples that come from Microsoft will be in C#.
    It will give you an edge to have that skill locked down tight.

    >Also, since you have VB experience, you also should look at VB.NET.


    I *personally* disagree. If you are a VB-guru, you will find VB.NET frustrating.
    It is very different from the VB you know and love. I love it, but I don't
    have a code-base to maintain/port. However after researching two features
    that are currently in C#, I find that I must make it my primary language:
    - XML documentation (think JavaDoc)
    - XML "persistance/assistance"

    I'm going to pull my examples, references from the February 2001 Doctor Dobbs
    Journal article C# versus Java (not online, sorry):
    http://www.ddj.com/articles/2001/0102/0102toc.htm

    - XML "persistance/assistance"
    This is the idea of defining "XML" hints to allow your classes to be easily
    serialized.

    Listing One - Class definition
    using System.NewXml;
    using System.Xml.Serialization;
    [XmlRoot("album", Namespace="music")]
    public class Album {
    [XmlElement("artist")]
    public string artist;
    [XmlElement("title")]
    public string title;
    [XmlArray("songs"), XmlArrayItem("song")]
    public string[] songs;
    }

    Listing Two - Test framework
    using System.Xml.Serialization;
    using System.IO;
    class TestAlbum
    {
    public static void Main() {
    Album album = new Album();
    album.artist = "Sasha";
    album.title = "Xpander";
    album.songs = new string[5];
    album.songs[0] = "Xpander Edit";
    album.songs[1] = "Xpander";
    album.songs[2] = "Belfunk";
    album.songs[3] = "Rabbitweed";
    album.songs[4] = "Baja";
    // Serialize the object to a file
    FileStream fs = new FileStream("Album.xml", FileMode.Create);
    XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Album));
    serializer.Serialize(fs, album);
    }
    }

    Listing Three - generated XML
    <?xml version="1.0"?>
    <album xmlns:xsi=http://www.w3.org/1999/XMLSchema-instance
    xmlns="music">
    <artist>Sasha</artist>
    <title>Xpander</title>
    <songs>
    <song>Xpander Edit</song>
    <song>Xpander</song>
    <song>Belfunk</song>
    <song>Rabbitweed</song>
    <song>Baja</song>
    </songs>
    </album>

    - XML documentation (think JavaDoc)
    /// <summary>
    /// blah blah blah
    /// </summary>

    >From what I've read, C# and VB.NET are give you very similar
    >functionality. The main difference is syntactic.


    Except in the above two areas.

    (PS, as this is in the career forum, thanks for the opp. Dave, sorry it didn't
    work out at that point in time)

    Regards
    Jason Kaczor

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
HTML5 Development Center
 
 
FAQ
Latest Articles
Java
.NET
XML
Database
Enterprise
Questions? Contact us.
C++
Web Development
Wireless
Latest Tips
Open Source


   Development Centers

   -- Android Development Center
   -- Cloud Development Project Center
   -- HTML5 Development Center
   -- Windows Mobile Development Center