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Thread: eclipse

  1. #16
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    Nov 2005
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    4
    I guess a file link won't work here?

    Right-click on your project -> New ->
    Add File
    Give it a file name (a corresponding one would probably be a good idea, but I have no idea)
    click the Advanced button
    Check "link to a file"
    click "Browse..."
    click Finish

    What's the problem with this method?

    As far as autocomplete, simply leave it up for a long time (maybe a couple of hours even, minimized in the taskbar), it'll eventually figure your stuff out (hopefully, for my sake).

    What do you mean #define management?
    The Outline view has limited refactoring available for #defines, but I'm not sure if that's what you're talking about?

    There's definitely search/replace/etc project wide, this is under the "Search" menu. Even the generic File search is usually good enough for me, but they have a C++ specific search as well.

    The builder/debug is great once you figure it out, though tough to get your mind around, I'll admit it.

    I liked your Linux vs Windows observation - definitely true for me! Converting to Linux seems like a life-long project for me!

    Best of luck,

    -Patrick

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    As far as your comment about "having already opted to use C++, there are probably better IDE's around then Eclipse" I would agree - generally. But I think when cost is a concern (when is it not?)

    -- one week of my time would purchase most IDE's for one seat. Thats generous, actually, based on take home pay not pre-tax etc. Ive spent over a week on eclipse already, starting with the examples, then writeing a small program, then trying the project (smack! cannot make progress). There are direct and hidden costs in every choice. I could have had a weeks vacation and had the company purchase something with the money they have paid me to get nowhere.

    when you develop in more than one language regularly (or on more than one platform), and once you realize the importance of developing ~good~ standard compliant, cross-platform compatible code -- there's really only one option, period.

    Thats a little extreme. The only problem with my code, built under .net, was use of winsockets (re-wrote one file for linux, a mistake on my part to use them) and failure to use case sensitive file names for .h files, and one very minor problem with g++ and namespaces. One day fixed all the files for linux, 90% of that was winsocket problems, 90% of those were the lack of support in the default kernel. .net does let you make a non-compatible mess if your not paying attention. Unix does too .. dozens and dozens of .h files that are not supported or renamed or in another place under windows (including, but not limited to, unix.h!). If you can get me up and running on eclipse I wont argue too hard here, but its not the ONLY choice.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    3,366
    I guess a file link won't work here?

    Right-click on your project -> New ->
    Add File
    Give it a file name (a corresponding one would probably be a good idea, but I have no idea)
    click the Advanced button
    Check "link to a file"
    click "Browse..."
    click Finish

    What's the problem with this method?
    ____________
    Well, I didnt SEE that, why would I want to do NEW when I have EXISTING code lol? I will certainly give it a try!

    As far as autocomplete, simply leave it up for a long time (maybe a couple of hours even, minimized in the taskbar), it'll eventually figure your stuff out (hopefully, for my sake).

    Ok, cool. I will do that too.

    What do you mean #define management?

    Just the ability to have a place to add the project defines, so I can hide a few window's things from g++ and vice versa. It has this.

    The refactoring thing is total nonsense to me, just random symbols. I thought refactor was a nice way to say rewrite? I could not make heads nor tails of it.

    There's definitely search/replace/etc project wide, this is under the "Search" menu. Even the generic File search is usually good enough for me, but they
    have a C++ specific search as well.

    Havent gotten this far, I was sure it was in there.

    The builder/debug is great once you figure it out, though tough to get your mind around, I'll admit it.

    I got the simple stuff to build, and it didnt need debugging, so Im not here yet.

    I liked your Linux vs Windows observation - definitely true for me! Converting to Linux seems like a life-long project for me!

    Best of luck,

    Thanks, I will give it another go when I get a free moment.

    -----
    Tried it and its working well so far. Except for painful slowness, its not so bad now. Did get a bunch of corrupt .d files (whatever that is??) that crash eclipse but they seem to be safe to delete when it happens, and whatever it does when it starts up makes new correct ones that work for a while. I probably won't use it because of the sluggishness, but I will learn enough to make it work just to say I can use it if I have to.



    -Patrick[/QUOTE]
    Last edited by jonnin; 11-04-2005 at 06:11 PM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    4,118
    I'm digressing here a bit, but since we're at it, I would like to ask all of you: which feature in your IDE is the most valuable one? I'm not talking about the trivial "Build" or "Step Into" keys but rather, the competitive edge -- what makes your IDE worth its while (or its weight in gold). In the case of VS I'd say that "Go to Declartaion" and "Go to Definition" are the ones. Yes, there's edit and continue, as well as auto-complete (which works just great, btw) but the former two are amazingly effective. I can't tell how much time they've saved me! with other IDEs, including C++ Builder, I had to locate the .h files, some of which are actually wrappers around .stl or other funcky extensions, then use F3, which doesn't work very well either and the go through dozens of symbols with the same name (think of overloaded functions, or worse: overloaded opereators). It could take hours just to find out what a miserable member function of a container returned!
    Last edited by Danny; 11-03-2005 at 07:40 PM.
    Danny Kalev

  5. #20
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    Dec 2003
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    I put auto-complete and parameter lists ( after the '(' on function names ) in visual at the top because, while we have an ok naming convention, I can't remember / create the names on the fly in my head. Same for parameters -- I just can't remember what goes into all the functions. The goto's you mentioned are nice, they get better as the project gets bigger! I have a good memory for what is in which file and with all the files on the left, I dont need them as much.

    One thing that saves me time is a mousless IDE. Visual can be configured to be nearly mouseless, I can lose the 'fat' button bars all the way around the thing, and maximize my code area and efficiency. (Pure coding, gui development is far from mouseless for me). I also like its class factory stuff, where you can add to a class without opening the class header.

    Flipside, if I could, I would pull out (vs) pre-compiled headers, non-standard main functions, managed code (or the built in 'desire' to use it, might leave it in). I HATE the visual debugger, perhaps its just me but I find stepping and breakpointing to kill more time than any other activity. I far prefer to stick in a few prints and only use the debugger for enhanced crash data (if you just run in debugger and it crashed, it says why in a cryptic fashion). I think I might be the only one who finds printf to be a better debug tool than stepping thru code looking at hex.

    Eclipse's 'compile on save' was nice for small projects, I can see that killing your speed in some cases. If it only did a syntax check (you can probably set this up) that would rule.

    I really liked borland builder except for the many windows vs one thing. That cut down my speed, but the way they handle the gui development is better than visual's. This is from a 3.0 perspective, the last time I had access to it. It was also mouse heavy, perhaps that has changed or I didnt know what to do back then.

  6. #21
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    Nov 2005
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    4
    I'm a huge fan of auto-complete, go-to-declaration, and parameter lists, but most modern IDE's do these things for you (admittedly with varying degrees of successfulness - I would definitely agree that, in C++, Eclipse's go-to-declaration is pretty week), so in order to differentiate, I would say I love Eclipse because of the versatility of the GUI. Whether you're on a dual monitor or a tiny 12" laptop, screen real estate is what it's all about. I love the view management in Eclipse, it's so easy to configure it however I want, say I want to split the screen and view one file while I edit another? No problem! Say I want to have one-click "hide" access to something that would otherwise require an inch and a half sidebar, no problem! Minimizing/Maximizing/Ordering/Sorting is nothing new I know, but I've never seen an implementation of it that's better or more robust than the Eclipse one.

    Another thing I love about Eclipse is how much I can do without ever leaving the IDE. copy/paste files, check something into CVS and something else out of Subversion (or vice versa), view an ftp server, change languages I'm working in.... the list goes on.. Cool!

    Danny, thanks for reminding me about Visual Studio's edit and continue - that is a sweet feature! And, in Java, Eclipse takes the "Go-to-Declaration" thing one step further, all you have to do to go to the definition is hold down ctrl, then click on the word. If it's a type, it'll open the .java file it's opened in (or the class one if it's in a package somewhere), if it's a variable, it'll take you to the source line where it was declared. Sweet!

    Later,

    -Patrick

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    173
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny
    BTW, VS has a free version called the Express Edition. It's not an Open Source product but mots OS users are using these products not because of ideology but simply because they don't want to pay for software.
    here's the link if anyone is interested.

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/ex...pport/install/

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1

    eclispe

    Hi all, I'm new to the forum and after reading this thread I had to reply.
    I work with Eclipse on a daily basis. I agree that the CDT is pretty lousy, but it has gotten better in the newest version.
    Anyhow, if you still need to know how to import just ONE file into a project here are the steps:

    1. File->Import->File System
    2. Browse to the directory that has the file
    3. Select the checkmark next to the directory, and then click the directory to highlight it.
    4. Right hand pane will show all the files, just select the one you want and deselect the ones you don't.
    5.Select the folder you want to import to, hit finish and you're done!!

    Hope that helps :WAVE:

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    None of these menus are in the version I had. The file links worked sort of. It decided to create corrupt .d files (whatever THAT is, nice friendly .extension there!) and crash on them. So about every 10 -20 min I get to exit, delete all the .d files, and open it again, wait 5 min on it to load, repeat. I have gotten REALLY good at same gnome however. I've tossed it out again for now.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    25

    Exclamation

    I use Eclipse for Java and PHP dev, and also use the Quantom DB plugin for database access, and it works fine. I dont know about the C++ Plugin, but as far as Java and Web dev, Eclipse is great and for the price of $0, it cant be beat. Your an idiot if you call the people who made Eclipse horrible programmers. I have honestly never ran into one problem while useing it for Java and Web work.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    4,118
    With all due respect, I expect you to respect this forum's guidelines. Your post may have been valid if it hadn't contained insults. Secondly, wehile we're at it, at the price of 0$, Eclispe and just any other product can still be beaten by -- guess what -- a better free product! Visual Studio 2005 Express Edition for example, which costs exactly that much OK, not on Linux but the point is this: free doesn't mean that all glitches and bugs are forgiven. And since you haven't used it as a C++ IDE, you probably haven't run into the trouble that jonnin and I have run into.
    Danny Kalev

  12. #27
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    He appears to be learning c++ -- lets see how he likes eclipse after that. Everyone I have talked to said its great for java.

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