Nicolas,

Alas, though that would seem to be the solution, it isn't. You should
look at MS's SQL Server licensing page. Even with connection pooling, or
your own data server that users hook up to, you still need a license for
each user "retrieving SQL Server data...". Microsoft seems to imply that the
data belongs to SQL Server, not you, but that's another conversation.

Regards,
D. Patrick Hoerter

Nicolas Burtnyk wrote in message <376a462b@NEWS.DEVX.COM>...
>So if I have only 1 machine that needs to access the database, I only need

1
>'per seat' license?
>Eg. a machine that serves up objects which in turn access the database....
>Thanks for any help,
>Nic
>
>C. E. Buttles <cebuttle@sprintsvc.net> wrote in message
>news:376a2fcb@NEWS.DEVX.COM...
>> Actually, it isn't. You only have three machines connecting to your one
>> server, hence three licenses. Either per server or per seat still

>requires
>> client licenses. The choice on the server installation covers how you

>want
>> those licenses applied. Per seat allows you to connect to more than one
>> server, per server requires licenses for each server. They used to allow
>> concurrent licenses which allowed you to buy licenses based on the number

>of
>> concurrent connections, not the total possible connections.
>>
>>
>> Tony Fountain <tonyfo#primenet.com> wrote in message
>> news:3769620f@NEWS.DEVX.COM...
>> > Hmm, guess I'll need to contact MS on this again since this is

>> contradictory
>> > to what they told me just a few months ago.
>> >
>> > --
>> >
>> > Later,
>> > Tony Fountain, MCP
>> > ===================================================
>> > Please do not email me directly, my wife already clutters up my inbox
>> > ===================================================
>> > C. E. Buttles <cebuttle@sprintsvc.net> wrote in message
>> > news:37693324@NEWS.DEVX.COM...
>> > > Actually, he is asking about CAL (Client Access Licenses). The SQL

>> Server
>> > > is sold, normally, with a number of licenses (which are CALs) plus

the
>> > > server license itself. They did away with concurrent licensing a

>couple
>> > of
>> > > years ago, so it cost more now. The license manager never works for

>me
>> > > because it counts the users and the client machines as separate
>> > connections.
>> > > Basically, if you have a large environment, you should use per seat
>> > > licensing for the server setup. This is cheaper be cause you buy

CALs
>> for
>> > > each machine times the number of applications that will access all

>your
>> > > servers. If you go with per server licensing, you are expected to

buy
>> > CALs
>> > > for each machine times the number of servers that machine will access

>> per
>> > > application.
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > Tony Fountain <tonyfo#primenet.com> wrote in message
>> > > news:376819a1@NEWS.DEVX.COM...
>> > > > Actually, there are two types of licensing, per my last

conversation
>> > with
>> > > > Microsoft. See my response to Nicolas for details.
>> > > >
>> > > > --
>> > > >
>> > > > Later,
>> > > > Tony Fountain, MCP
>> > > > ===================================================
>> > > > Please do not email me directly, my wife already clutters up my

>inbox
>> > > > ===================================================
>> > > > Steve Jackson <stephen.t.jackson@lmco.com> wrote in message
>> > > > news:3768217f.696865@news.devx.com...
>> > > > >
>> > > > > Usually server licensing is for the number of concurrent

>> connections -
>> > > > > the number actually connected and active at one point in time,

>> rather
>> > > > > than one "named user" license for each and every user. However,

>I'm
>> > > > > not a lawyer, I don't work for Microsoft, and I have not read the

>> SQL
>> > > > > Server license recently!
>> > > > >
>> > > > > Steve J.
>> > > > >
>> > > > >
>> > > > > On Wed, 16 Jun 1999 10:07:11 -0400, "Nicolas Burtnyk"
>> > > > > <nburtn@cs.mcgill.ca> wrote:
>> > > > >
>> > > > > >I am confused as to what is meant by a 'client' in the SQL Serve

r
>> > > > licensing
>> > > > > >agreement. Do you need a client license for each connection to

>the
>> > > > > >database? For example, do I need a client license for each user

>of
>> > an
>> > > > > >application that accesses my SQL Server database???? It doesn't

>> seem
>> > > > right
>> > > > > >to me. I would appreciate any clarifications.
>> > > > > >
>> > > > > >
>> > > > >
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> >
>> >

>>
>>

>
>