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Thread: Attn: Kathleen Dollard

  1. #1
    Kevin Moore Guest

    Attn: Kathleen Dollard


    Kathleen,

    I applaud you efforts to moving this forum towards a more respectable and
    coherent discussion about .Net, but alas it seems that most of the people
    here are caught within a Miller Lite commercial ... Tastes Great, Less Filling.

    I do have a question for you. In a response to your "Truce" post you mentioned
    several advantages .Net has of VB Classic. I have been playing with Beta
    2 since the beginning of August and I would appreciate if you could highlight
    several areas that you thought .Net was better than Classic, in regards to
    a traditional N-tier db app.

    Kevin

  2. #2
    Kathleen Dollard Guest

    Re: Kathleen Dollard

    Kevin,

    I do want to clarify that I think the value is an overall thing, the
    consistency and elegance, a lot of small things. The devil is in the details
    of a programming language, and overall, with the exception of compatibility
    and a few little dumb things, the language is well done, IMO.

    I am assuming by traditional n-tier you means you are targeting WinForms
    (and don't have Win95 clients) and that you are using SQL Server for the
    back end. To start with, if you are using MTS, you can reconsider whether
    you need as it is no longer the only way to do object pooling. The ADO.Net
    model is significantly different, and has a couple of options. But whatever
    option you take, you have some combination of type safety, easy handling of
    multi-recordset stored proc returns, client side relationships (don't over
    use, but if you are already doing this in code via filtering it is huge).
    Databinding deserves another look, at least for your rudimentary forms
    (leaving you more time to play in the complexities of your domain).

    I like flash though, so I like the direct user interface improvements from
    allowing simple placement of a graphic (company logo) on a MDI background,
    to a non-buggy container based tab control. Resizing, docking and splitters
    take a little to get use to (because of the ZOrder dependency when you get
    complex forms you might have to play a bit at first) but there is really no
    reason not to do fully resizing panes (splitter based) in most of your UI.
    The user experience is just smoother with these niceties.

    Jay Glynn also had a nice post in another thread with a bullet list, and I
    would be glad to expand on any of these or others.

    --
    Kathleen
    (MS-MVP)
    Reply in the newsgroup so everyone can benefit
    --




  3. #3
    Dan Fergus Guest

    Re: Kathleen Dollard

    Kevin,

    Two items pop to mind right off the bat...

    1) If you do any work in the registry then you will find using the
    namespaces to be 100% easier than the cryptic API calls.
    2) If you ever subclassed a form and had to fight the IDE and the
    subclassing code then the WndPRoc method on a WinForm will take hours off of
    your development and debugging.

    Dan

    "Kevin Moore" <Kevin@MooreSSI.com> wrote in message
    news:3bb10165@news.devx.com...
    >
    > Kathleen,
    >
    > I applaud you efforts to moving this forum towards a more respectable and
    > coherent discussion about .Net, but alas it seems that most of the people
    > here are caught within a Miller Lite commercial ... Tastes Great, Less

    Filling.
    >
    > I do have a question for you. In a response to your "Truce" post you

    mentioned
    > several advantages .Net has of VB Classic. I have been playing with Beta
    > 2 since the beginning of August and I would appreciate if you could

    highlight
    > several areas that you thought .Net was better than Classic, in regards to
    > a traditional N-tier db app.
    >
    > Kevin




  4. #4
    Kevin Moore Guest

    Re: Kathleen Dollard


    Kathleen,

    Thanks for your reply.

    I am leaning towards re-engineering our current app within .Net due to alot
    of the reasons that you mentioned, but I have a huge concern about the CLR.
    I expect it to become like the current VB runtimes, eg. I develop against
    Version 1.0 of the runtime and distribute to my 10 clients our app with V1.0.
    Version 2.0 of the runtime is released and fixes some bugs, so we develop
    against Version 2.0 of the runtime, I therefore have to redistribute the
    entire CLR run-time with an update to our app. Given that I expect the CLR
    to be upwards of 10 Mb this is a rather onerous (sp!) task.

    Do you have any comments on this? What are your expectations about the CLR?

    I would be very interested in seeing the .Net list you mentioned that another
    poster created.

    Thanks again,

    Kevin



  5. #5
    Kathleen Dollard Guest

    Re: Kathleen Dollard

    Kevin,

    The size of the CLR is a concern where updates are not going to be
    distributed over broadband or CD. I expect that it will not be updated all
    that often, but periodically. We don't know yet what Microsoft products it
    might be distributed with, so the user may or may not have other reasons to
    move to the new CLR.

    Sorry that I have lost the thread with Jay's list in it.

    --
    Kathleen
    (MS-MVP)
    Reply in the newsgroup so everyone can benefit
    --



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