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Thread: Info on c++ books

  1. #1
    Program.2000 Guest

    Info on c++ books


    I'm learning c++ at home I have bought my first book Sam's Teach Yourself
    C++ in 21 days. What kind of books do I need to read to learn more about
    c++ then I already know? Thanks, Vitto.

  2. #2
    stoned coder Guest

    Re: Info on c++ books


    "Program.2000" <vitto24_7@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >I'm learning c++ at home I have bought my first book Sam's Teach Yourself
    >C++ in 21 days. What kind of books do I need to read to learn more about
    >c++ then I already know? Thanks, Vitto.


    For intermediate stuff you can try the excellent How to program c++ by Deitel
    and Deitel.This is a reasonably well written book that covers most beginner
    to intermediate level c++.It has an awfully large amount of exercises to
    help you learn.
    When you have worked your way through that have a look at Bjarne Stroustrops
    The c++ programming language.This also has a generous amount of exercises
    most of which are much harder than those in the previous book. If you work
    through the exercises in these books I would imagine you would know c++ pretty
    well by then.

  3. #3
    Danny Kalev Guest

    Re: Info on c++ books

    I think you should move on to more serious stuff. Stroustrup's "The C++
    Programming Language" is a must have for every C++ programmer. Though
    parts of it may be a bit hard to swallow at first, this book will serve
    for years and it's undoubtedly the ultimate resource for serious, real
    world C++ programming. I wouldn't spend more time on primer books.

    Danny

    "Program.2000" wrote:
    >
    > I'm learning c++ at home I have bought my first book Sam's Teach Yourself
    > C++ in 21 days. What kind of books do I need to read to learn more about
    > c++ then I already know? Thanks, Vitto.


  4. #4
    Ted Guest

    Re: Info on c++ books


    Danny Kalev <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote:
    >I think you should move on to more serious stuff. Stroustrup's "The C++
    >Programming Language" is a must have for every C++ programmer. Though
    >parts of it may be a bit hard to swallow at first, this book will serve
    >for years and it's undoubtedly the ultimate resource for serious, real
    >world C++ programming. I wouldn't spend more time on primer books.
    >
    >Danny
    >
    >"Program.2000" wrote:
    >>
    >> I'm learning c++ at home I have bought my first book Sam's Teach Yourself
    >> C++ in 21 days. What kind of books do I need to read to learn more about
    >> c++ then I already know? Thanks, Vitto.


    I agree with Danny. Stroustroup and both Scott Meyers books are classic.
    Also to say "you would know c++ pretty well by then" after reading Stroustroup
    is an overstatement. I was at a Scott Meyers seminar on STL and someone
    asked where he saw himself on a scale of 1-10 as a C++ programmer, he replied
    "8". That puts knowing C++ in perspective.



  5. #5
    William E. Roberson Guest

    Re: Info on c++ books


    "Ted" <TTarney@rens.com> wrote:
    >
    >Danny Kalev <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote:
    >>I think you should move on to more serious stuff. Stroustrup's "The C++
    >>Programming Language" is a must have for every C++ programmer. Though
    >>parts of it may be a bit hard to swallow at first, this book will serve
    >>for years and it's undoubtedly the ultimate resource for serious, real
    >>world C++ programming. I wouldn't spend more time on primer books.
    >>
    >>Danny
    >>
    >>"Program.2000" wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I'm learning c++ at home I have bought my first book Sam's Teach Yourself
    >>> C++ in 21 days. What kind of books do I need to read to learn more about
    >>> c++ then I already know? Thanks, Vitto.

    >
    >I agree with Danny. Stroustroup and both Scott Meyers books are classic.
    > Also to say "you would know c++ pretty well by then" after reading Stroustroup
    >is an overstatement. I was at a Scott Meyers seminar on STL and someone
    >asked where he saw himself on a scale of 1-10 as a C++ programmer, he replied
    >"8". That puts knowing C++ in perspective.
    >
    >



  6. #6
    William E. Roberson Guest

    Re: Info on c++ books


    "William E. Roberson" <wero@chevron.com> wrote:
    >One of the best books that I came across for C++ is "CORE C++" when it comes

    to writing C++ programs the most efficient way.
    >"Ted" <TTarney@rens.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>Danny Kalev <dannykk@inter.net.il> wrote:
    >>>I think you should move on to more serious stuff. Stroustrup's "The C++
    >>>Programming Language" is a must have for every C++ programmer. Though
    >>>parts of it may be a bit hard to swallow at first, this book will serve
    >>>for years and it's undoubtedly the ultimate resource for serious, real
    >>>world C++ programming. I wouldn't spend more time on primer books.
    >>>
    >>>Danny
    >>>
    >>>"Program.2000" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm learning c++ at home I have bought my first book Sam's Teach Yourself
    >>>> C++ in 21 days. What kind of books do I need to read to learn more about
    >>>> c++ then I already know? Thanks, Vitto.

    >>
    >>I agree with Danny. Stroustroup and both Scott Meyers books are classic.
    >> Also to say "you would know c++ pretty well by then" after reading Stroustroup
    >>is an overstatement. I was at a Scott Meyers seminar on STL and someone
    >>asked where he saw himself on a scale of 1-10 as a C++ programmer, he replied
    >>"8". That puts knowing C++ in perspective.
    >>
    >>

    >



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